Navy Puts Climate Change at Top of Threat List - Larry Wilkerson


Larry Wilkerson reports on a webinar where the U.S. Navy described climate change as an existential risk. Will the civilian leadership finally take urgent action?


Paul Jay

Hi. Welcome to theAnalysis.news. I’m Paul Jay. I will be back in just a few seconds with Larry Wilkerson, who just recently attended a conference on the climate crisis and how it might affect the U.S. Navy. This was a webinar held by the Navy and the War College. Larry will tell us more about it in just a few seconds.

 

Anyone that’s watched my interviews with Larry Wilkerson, who is the former chief of staff for Colin Powell at the State Department. He worked with Powell at the Joint Chiefs. He has been in the military for decades. Anyone that’s watched my interviews with Larry will know that he and I are no fans of U.S. foreign policy and no fans of the U.S. military-industrial complex. I would say Larry is one of the most important and outstanding critics of all of that. But all that said, one needs to acknowledge that to a large extent, the U.S. military, and maybe particularly the Navy because they would be the most urgently affected, have been fairly realistic about the threat of the climate crisis. They are not climate science deniers by any means. In terms of the U.S. government apparatus, maybe they’re the most open publicly, outside of some of the straightforward environmental agencies, about the danger of the climate crisis. They do it from the point of view of how to strengthen and maintain the power of the U.S. Navy, but still, they don’t really mince words about how dangerous this situation is.

 

Now, let’s remember, the Republican Party and much of the Democratic Party that claims to be so pro-military has no climate policy that reflects the urgency of the situation, even as it’s explained to them and publicly by the Navy. Let’s not forget, 75 million people in the last election voted for a climate science denier. The media pays very little attention to the climate crisis unless there’s a fire. Even when there are fires in California and droughts in the Midwest, sometimes they don’t even mention the words climate change.

 

Larry Wilkerson went to a conference this morning, as we speak, with the Navy sounding the alarm, and he’s going to tell us about it. So, Larry, thanks very much for joining us again.

Lawrence Wilkerson

Surely.

Paul Jay

So what did you hear?

Lawrence Wilkerson

I heard that what Michael Klare wrote in his book, All Hell Breaking Loose, is readily acknowledged by all the services, but particularly the Navy, for some of the reasons you just reiterated. The Navy is, after all, on the ocean. The Navy is, after all, almost entirely coastal installations that are subject to sea rise. As I found out this morning, as with the Army, drought is as big a threat to them as sea rise. The Army has even prioritized drought at the top of its threats from climate change, and that’s because the surrounding communities in the southwest of the United States, in particular, are suffering so badly and probably will continue to suffer. The installations located there are going to suffer too. So drought is very high on the Army’s priority, and it’s high on the Navy’s, too, because a lot of the drought is impacting places like San Diego, for example, which are Navy bastions.

Paul Jay

Now this morning, after the webinar, you told me you thought it was so good you felt like cheering. So elaborate. What are some of the specifics of what you heard?

Lawrence Wilkerson

Well, it’s so disgusting that the government is doing nothing. The federal government outside the DOD [the United States Department of Defense] is– I shouldn’t say nothing. They’re doing a lot more than they were five years ago when I first started speaking out on this matter, but they’re not doing nearly enough. Biden issued the Executive Order, for example, that started the Climate Change Corps, which I’m all for. I think, finally, at the end of the day, we’re going to have to have a draft for that, and we’re probably going to have to put 10-11, maybe even 12-13 million people into it, young people into it. Right now, the Executive Order only calls for volunteers. Well, we know what volunteers do. Look at the all-volunteer force. There’s not a volunteer in it. It’s all money, bribes, and so forth. But even with that being done by the Biden administration, I’ve been appalled at the lack of action on the part of the civilian bureaucracy, the civilian leadership.

 

This morning, I knew the military services were leading. I knew they had long ago put climate change at the top of their threat list. I knew that they viewed it as an existential threat. I knew that they viewed it as an incredible drain on their budgets in the future, primarily because of humanitarian assistance and disaster relief going up by a factor of ten times. But I didn’t know that they were so methodical about their approach to it. Maybe I should have. My time on the Climate Security Working Group would indicate that they were developing that kind of methodology. Still, it surprised me this morning how forward-leaning, how much in front of the foxhole the U.S. Navy is.

 

We were briefed by the Vice Admiral who heads– he’s actually the CNO, the Chief of Naval Operations, logistics expert. They are framed for climate change. It represents everything from what is called drop-in fuel, for example. They want to be able to take fuel off a barge, for example. The barge would create the hydrogen or create the alternative fuel, and there would be no requirement for that fuel and the apparatus to generate it to be on the warship, to be on the platform that actually fights for the Navy. It would be on a barge somewhere, and they would pull up to that barge, and the hydrogen, or whatever it turns out to be, would be offloaded into the mechanism of the ship that uses that fuel. All kinds of innovation and working with universities.

 

I was somewhat taken aback when I heard him talk about UVA, the University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech working with Yorktown, which I used to drive by almost every time I used the old highway when I was teaching at William and Mary. No mention of William and Mary. So I fired off an email immediately to the Virginia Institute of Maritime Studies and to the New Institute for Integrated Conservation at William and Mary. Why aren’t you being talked about by Admiral [Ricky Lee] Williamson? This is crazy. UVA is in on it. Virginia Tech’s in on it. They’re helping. This is the way it should be. You’re not doing anything, apparently, because you weren’t even mentioned.

 

Then we moved over to the doctor, Dr. Mark Spector, from the Office of Naval Research, ONR, probably one of the best research entities in the United States of America. He’s talking about, “I need academic help. I need help. Come to our website and look at all the projects we’re working on. Everything from batteries to alternative fuels, to you name it. I need your help. Come on, register with us, and help us out.” This is what should be happening.

Paul Jay

Well, the military certainly knows how to acquire research and pay for research, and the military, including the Navy, although maybe I don’t know if they’re the worst, but as a whole, the U.S. military is one of the worst carbon emitters on the planet.

Lawrence Wilkerson

Absolutely and readily admitted to it.

Paul Jay

So what are they going to do about that? They don’t need Congress. I guess they need funding, but they’re getting tons of funding. Are they going to use that money to actually transition to sustainable?

Lawrence Wilkerson

Already are. Every initiative that Admiral Williamson and others, Deborah Loomis, for example, who is the Secretary of the Navy’s Special Assistant for Climate Change. Just imagine some senator having a Special Assistant for Climate Change. They all talked about how this is at the root of making the Navy a better Navy than any other Navy in the world because we are charged with protecting the seas, protecting the country’s commerce, and so forth. So we have got to have a Navy that can operate in this rapidly changing climate situation. So that’s their number one alternative or number one objective. I have no objection to that. That’s their business. But at the same time, they realize they’re contributing.

 

So every initiative they’re working on is also double-hatted, if you will. It’s to make the operational capacity better, and it’s also to reduce their contributions to the problems that the operational capacity has to confront, and that is climate change. So they’re trying to bring down their signature. They’re trying to bring down their carbon emissions. Every initiative has that attached to it– to add to the amelioration aspect of what they say is the two-pronged way to go after climate change. Adaptation, because we’re so late, we’re going to have to adapt to things like sea rise in Norfolk. We can’t stop it, not stop it completely, so we got to adapt.

 

Two, and this five years ago, I wouldn’t hear anybody talk about it because they were afraid to talk about it. Congress would reprimand them and maybe even threaten their budget if they talked about it– amelioration. When you talk about amelioration, you have to talk about the human contribution to climate change, of which the Navy and the other services are a great component. The DOD is [inaudible 00:09:57] list of nations would be 55th right beside Portugal or something like that. It gives off a lot of emissions, so they are double-pronged. They’re going after the operational capacity, which is essential for the services, and at the same time, they’re going after that portion, which is large, and they realize the problem that they’re creating.

Paul Jay

Well, part of what they’re creating is based on this policy, which is certainly pushed by the Pentagon of needing this enormous global military footprint to maintain U.S. global hegemony, which to a large extent, I think is kind of ridiculous because when’s the last time they won a major war? And what the hell do all these bases do anyway? One of the fastest ways for the military not to be such a carbon emitter is not to be so damn big.

Lawrence Wilkerson

You make a good point, but you make it for those elements of the military that I would probably agree with your point on. I’m a big fan of the Navy. I went to the Naval War College. I’m steeped in the Navy, if you will. The history of the United States is the history of the United States Navy in many respects, all the way from John Paul Jones forward. The Navy is an arm of the armed forces which is designed to protect international commerce. It doesn’t confine its protection of international commerce to U.S. commerce. It guarantees freedom of the seas and operational capability on those seas, even to our enemy’s militaries, but certainly to our friends, our enemies, and our neutrals’ commerce. That’s the essence of the Navy. If I had to do away with the United States military, the last aspect of it I’d do away with is the Navy for that very reason.

 

It’s been argued that the most important clause in our constitution is not the things we usually cite; it’s the commerce clause because that’s essentially what we are as a nation of commerce. I wish we were more so even than we are today because we’ve become a nation of banking and finance more than commerce. That’s what we’re supposed to be. That’s what we were built to be. That’s what [George] Washington, [Thomas] Jefferson, [Alexander] Hamilton, and all the founding fathers thought would be the power of this country was commerce. The Navy was built, and the Navy was put to sea to protect that commerce. As far as I’m concerned, that’s a benign task until it turns hot. When you encounter someone who wants to interrupt that commerce, as we did off the coast of Somalia with terrorists who wanted to interdict the commerce through the Red Sea, now far more important than the Persian Gulf– 60% of the world’s commerce goes through the Red Sea, through the Bab-el-Mandeb, and into the Red Sea. The protection of that is the United States Navy. Let me hasten to add the Chinese Navy, the Italian Navy, soon to be the Turkish Navy probably, the Japanese Navy, the combined task force that dealt with those Somali pirates that were interdicting commerce was joint. It was 7-8 different nations, and now most of those nations are in Djibouti because of that.

Paul Jay

But if the mission was defending commerce, you probably could get rid of about 75% of it. I mean, how much of it is about posturing around Taiwan?

Lawrence Wilkerson

Well, you got a point there. You could do something that I think is absolutely essential. We’re going to talk about this in April at the Pritzker Military Institute and Military Museum in Chicago. It’s a very prestigious place where we’re going to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the all-volunteer force. But the panel I’m going to be on is going to talk about technological change and how that could be used to reshape the U.S. military.

Paul Jay

I was about to say I’ve heard even neocons say aircraft carriers are simply floating targets that could be taken out at any time. They’re boondoggles.

Lawrence Wilkerson

Their offensive purpose is to attack other countries. That’s really what their offensive purpose is. Now, you can say, “oh, no, they protect the other surface ships that protect commerce at sea and so forth.” I would say quickly, “submarines can do that. Submarines can do that all day long, and they don’t present, other than their ballistic missiles, that threat to onshore countries and people.” So if you wanted to redesign the U.S. military to be more in concert with what we purport our missions in the world, you would certainly keep the Navy. You might think about the other services and consider the past. What did we do? We had fairly powerful big navies, and we had very, very small armies, and we didn’t even have an airforce.

Paul Jay

Going back to the conference– of the various speakers, what were their views of when this is all coming down? You told me earlier it was pretty scary, some of what you heard. So what are they predicting and when?

Lawrence Wilkerson

It’s here, and they know it. Admiral Williamson talked, for example, about the nation’s only naval-aviator training space, Pensacola, and having to rebuild it completely now, post-hurricane. It was really badly damaged, just as was the base in northern Florida that Congress wouldn’t let the Navy move or wouldn’t let the Air Force move. It’s really an Air Force base. They wouldn’t let him move it, and I think it was $4 billion worth of damage that the hurricane did. Of course, the Air Force wanted to move it. They didn’t want to stay there because what’s going to happen? It’s going to get hit again. But now Congress, because of political constituency in Florida, has said, “no, you will rebuild it to the tune of $4-5 billion.” That’s crazy. That’s insane. They wanted to do something smart. They wanted to move it inland. They wanted to get away from that kind of possibility, but no, they’re not going to be able to. But they will rebuild it with ten times more resilience than it had before in terms of the buildings, in terms of how they lay things out, in terms of how, for example, Guam is laid out.

 

Now, if you’ve ever been to Guam lately, you know that Guam is an aesthetic nightmare. I mean, that’s the way I would describe it. It’s been built to withstand 200-knot winds from typhoons, so everything is built low, lean, and austere. It just looks horrible from an aesthetic point of view.

Paul Jay

Did they paint a picture of what the next 10, 20, or 30 years look like?

Lawrence Wilkerson

In a sense, yeah, because they were talking about how conflict is going to– you’re going to have conflict all over the world. You’re going to have conflict that is induced partially, initially, as it is now today in the Global South, by climate change. But then you’re going to have conflict that is primarily induced by climate change. That is to say, it’s going to become so bad that people are going to have to migrate. We’re talking about everything from 120 to 130 degrees F, day after day after day after day. Parched land because of that. No water because of that. No crops because of that, and people moving because of that.

Paul Jay

Yeah, I mean, hundreds of millions of people from the South having to move North. What is that? What does that mean?

Lawrence Wilkerson

It’s already happening. The New York Times sits around and writes about this, and the Guardian even writes about this, and no one says, as you mentioned in your lead-in, no one says, “oh, maybe these people are moving partly at least now because of climate change.” You’d think so. Yes, of course, they are. If they’re coming out of Nicaragua, Honduras, or Guatemala, they’ve had massive hurricane damage down there. They’ve had drought down there. They’ve had floods down there. That’s why some of these people are leaving because it’s awfully difficult to live, let alone work and make a living.

 

Look at Cuba. Cuba had more problems with this last hurricane than it’s had with any other hurricane in its past, and Cuba has loads of experience with hurricanes. When I was down there in 2009 and 2010, I got briefings on how they did things, and I wanted to transfer that to Florida and to Texas. My problem was Cuba can say, “get out of your house,” and people leave. In Florida, you say, “get out of your house,” and half the people stay, and then you have to go rescue them and risk people’s lives doing it. Well, that’s our democracy; that’s our freedom. But Cuba has a much better way of handling hurricanes, serious hurricanes, than probably anybody else in the Caribbean and certainly better than us. But they didn’t handle this one very well, and they didn’t because it was so massive, and they’ve had a lot of problems with recovering from that. Not just the usual problems they’re having with their energy grid and so forth, but all kinds of problems that occurred because of the latest hurricane. So that’s a problem.

 

Now, have you seen the stats on how many Cubans are leaving Cuba? It’s incredible. It’s worse than any boat lift we’ve ever had. It’s worse than all the past immigration. We’ve changed Jesse Helms and Richard Burton’s laws. You can’t just put your foot on U.S. territory and become a U.S. citizen now. Because hundreds of thousands of people have left, you actually have to go through some sort of process. Now they’ve modified and expedited the process, but you still have to go through the process.

Paul Jay

But do you think this increased migration is also connected to the climate issue, to the hurricane?

Lawrence Wilkerson

Yes, it is partially. It’s also part of the blockade we have on Cuba because there are no economic prospects. You notice that President Biden has just started re-implementing some of President Obama’s policies. For example, we just began to approve Western Union– you can send remittances down to Cuba now if you’re a Cuban American living in Florida.

Paul Jay

Chomsky and a lot of other climate scientists I’ve interviewed, people that are authors of the IPCC [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] reports, they’re predicting essentially, and within 30, 40 years, 50 years max, and maybe sooner– these timelines are very unpredictable. There are various tipping points in the climate structure where this whole thing could be happening much faster. In fact, it always is happening faster than the IPCC reports. As soon as a report comes out, it’s outdated within a very short time. The predictions are essentially the end of organized human society. People are using language like that. Does the military get that the threat is at that level? Do they talk like that? And do they tell their supposed political masters that this is the threat?

Lawrence Wilkerson

Well, I don’t know what they say in the councils of government. I suspect they’re somewhat limited in the rhetoric they use with President Biden and others like him, Tony Blinken, Jake Sullivan, and so forth. But I don’t think people like General [Mark] Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chief of Staff, holds anything back. I think the fact that they have put climate change as the number one future threat to the armed forces of the United States ought to make every single doubting American stand up and take notice. Even Marjorie Taylor Greene, asshole that she is.

Paul Jay

So why aren’t they?

Lawrence Wilkerson

You can’t be sending a trillion freaking dollars to an instrument that you praise day in and day out, that you have special sessions of Congress to thank. You can’t be doing that. And then when they turn around and tell you the number one threat to your existence, lady, is climate change, and continue unless you’re warped, and Marjorie Taylor Greene is warped.

Paul Jay

Well, the Republican Party, as you and I have discussed, has essentially become like a criminal family of various forms. Climate science denial just feeds their base, and they don’t seem to give a damn about the consequences. The Democratic Party leadership, not certainly the whole party, but the leadership, while in rhetoric, they seem to get it. Even this last big bill, this supposed anti thing called– I can’t remember what’s it called– the anti-inflation bill that didn’t have anything to do with inflation. It did more than previous bills. But they’re not out there pounding this message you heard from the Navy about how this is the number one threat. I mean, China supposedly is the number one threat. Russia is the number one threat. You don’t hear that climate is the number one threat from any of the political circles.

Lawrence Wilkerson

Here’s a little insight into that with regard to the military. Even though the admiral, the assistant to the Secretary of the Navy, and others, kept making the point about how operational advantage was gained from being ahead of the power curve, especially the really vicious part of the power curve, like, for example, sea rise, they kept saying things like, we’re cooperating with Vietnam. We’re cooperating with China. We’re cooperating with Russia.

 

There was one really poignant story that one of the lower-ranking people told. They had just been– no, it wasn’t a lower rank. It was a lower-ranking person telling the story, but it was the Secretary of the Navy who went to Fiji over the objections of the White House and the DOD and gave a speech on climate change. They said he should give a speech on how China’s a threat and all this. He went to Fiji, and he gave this speech. When he finished the speech, one of the members of the Fijian audience came up to him and said, “thank you very much for doing that. You finally recognize the fact that we’re getting screwed out here, and we are your allies.” And that’s it.

 

They went to the Mekong Delta in Vietnam, and this is the Navy now, and they’re dealing with the problems that Vietnam is going to confront with the Mekong. All of a sudden, one of the Vietnamese from the government– this is a communist government, Paul– and he said, “we’ve got a lot of students getting their doctorates, and they are coming up with some good ideas.” Fast forward. The Navy sat in on the doctoral briefings of those students from Vietnamese universities, with the faculty grading the students on the quality of their dissertations in order to see if they could gain more ideas about how to deal with climate change. This is what should be happening all over the world. This is going to kill us all. We need to be cooperating. We need to be collaborating. This is what is happening in these esoteric military channels because the military understands, at root, this is something everybody has to contribute to. Enemy. Friend. Mutual Ally.

Paul Jay

Was there any whisper of the necessity of some kind of negotiated settlement to this war in Ukraine for this reason to get this conversation moved over to climate?

Lawrence Wilkerson

I think they stayed away from that in this particular webinar because it would have been distracting in terms of the main message they wanted to send. But if you got Admiral Williamson, or we also had the Royal Navy there in terms of Admiral Paul Beattie, the U.K., if you got them aside, you probably would get them to say, “this is the dumbest thing on the face of the Earth.” Now, they couldn’t say that for political reasons, but this war is crazy. It’s crazy.

 

Yesterday, I was also in a Quincy Institute program. It was Chatham House rules, so I won’t name anybody or anything, but basically, the experts that we brought in to brief us on the Ukraine situation essentially said, “we’re probably looking at two to three years…” think about that for a minute. “Two to three years more of war, and then both sides will tire if we can control escalation during those two or three years– and that is a real big question– both sides will look at each other and say, this is really bad stuff. Let’s have a negotiated ceasefire, and then we’ll have a DMZ [Demilitarized Zone], U.N. peacekeepers in 75 years, like in Cyprus, like in Pakistan, like on the Indian Chinese border, like in Korea. We’ll have 75 years of a demilitarized zone and a negotiated ceasefire, and that’s the best we can do.” If that’s the best we can do, we are certainly hurting in Washington, Moscow, and everywhere.

Paul Jay

And the way U.S. policy is now is to keep arms at a level that the Ukrainians can’t lose. Don’t give arms at a level that would actually threaten the Russians getting completely nuts. So this goes on and on and on.

Lawrence Wilkerson

The talk now with this main battle tank business and this pressure on Germany to give Leopards to them, on the U.K. to give Centurions to them, and on us to give Abrams to them, which is pressure from the military-industrial complex, I guarantee you, is indicative of how it could escalate anywhere in that two or three years before we get to a stalemated ceasefire. It’s a cash cow. I mean, that’s Lockheed Martin’s dream to have this go on and on and on. Look, they’re making money off the munitions going to Ukraine and then making a double hit off the munitions going back into the U.S. and our allies’ stockpiles that got depleted because of the munitions going to Ukraine. I mean, this is nirvana for them.

Paul Jay

On Putin’s side, he’d rather this go on forever in order to avoid the humiliation of a deal that ends up back on February 23 because then what did the tens of thousands of Russian soldiers die for? So it’s insanity on all sides.

Lawrence Wilkerson

It is. This whole situation is insane. It’s utterly insane. But it’s very profitable. Very profitable. It’s profitable for Putin, too. If you look at how sanctions have forced other countries to line up with Russia with regard, particularly to petroleum, but other things, too, it’s profitable for them also, unlike what we say, because we like to think our sanctions are working, they aren’t.

Paul Jay

So, just before we conclude the interview, Larry, is there anything else that came up at that Navy Climate webinar that we should hear?

Lawrence Wilkerson

Well, there’s one powerful message coming forward from the individual in charge of the Navy, and I got the impression a wider writ within DOD, what’s called Vector Control or Vector Analysis– disease is what it’s about. It’s pandemics. It’s things like ebola in Zaire. It’s really dangerous operation within the global climate with regard to disease and the passing of disease from population to population. It was somewhat frightening, the charts he put up, and he talked about how this is what we’re doing in the so-called Global South. We’re using these pesticides. This is what we’re doing with these pesticides, and this is how what we’re doing with these pesticides is adding to the drama and the depth and profundity of climate change and, at the same time, to the ultimate problem they’re going to have, raising any kind of edible food. Don’t just mention drought, but all this other stuff, too. And then talk about the vectors coming out of this.

 

Vector control in the army was essentially controlling rats because they spread disease, as you well know– the bubonic plague and things like that. Well, vector control now is not just rats. It’s all these things coming out of places that wouldn’t have come out of there had the heat not gotten to the level it’s gotten to, had the rapacious, predatory capitalism not ripped apart the terrain the way it has. And had we not had some of these policies and practices in place that are there because we’ve robbed them of the capacity to have higher tech solutions to their problems, and so they’re going back to really bad pesticides and things like that to take care of their problems.

 

All of this is a part of the way– in Fiji, it was said to the SECNAV, as it was reported on this webinar, “most of this is your fault.” Bingo! Bingo! It’s not the Pacific Islander’s fault. It’s not Palau’s fault. It’s not Micronesia’s fault. It’s not Kiribati’s fault. It’s our fault. “Hey, we’re your allies. What are you doing?” The [crosstalk 00:31:45] is your fault.

Paul Jay

Does the Navy say this stuff to congressional committees? I mean, do they talk?

Lawrence Wilkerson

That’s a good question. I don’t know. I don’t know. It’s a good question. It’s a good question. Are they as candid with their congressional oversight as they were with us on this webinar? I don’t know. I hope they are.

Paul Jay

Maybe you can find out and we can talk about it.

Lawrence Wilkerson

I can tell you I’ve been that candid with members of Congress, and some react and some don’t, the majority being in the latter category.

Paul Jay

Well, it’d be interesting to find out because, you know, in theory, they should have public hearings, and the various committees in the House and the Senate that oversee the military should hear this stuff. If they have, I guess it’s understandable why they ignore it because all they care about is their funders who don’t seem to care about this.

Lawrence Wilkerson

On Monday, I’m going over to the Hill with Major General Laich. to talk with several members about some of these issues, including the all-volunteer force. I’ll make that a point.

Paul Jay

Alright, thanks very much, Larry. Thank you all for joining us on theAnalysis.news. Please don’t forget there’s a donate button at the top of the web page. There is a subscribe to the email list on our web page. On YouTube, you can subscribe, and you’ll supposedly get notices. I think a lot of people say they subscribe on YouTube, and YouTube doesn’t send them notices. Our audience on all the various podcast platforms is probably even significantly bigger than our YouTube audience. So if you’re listening on the podcast platform, come on over to the website and get on the email list. Thanks for joining us.



Paul Jay 

Hola. Bienvenido a theAnalysis.news. Soy Paul Jay. 

Volveré en unos segundos con Larry Wilkerson, quien recientemente asistió a una conferencia sobre la crisis climática y cómo podría esta afectar a la Marina de los EE. UU. Este fue un seminario web organizado por la Marina y la Escuela Superior de Guerra. Larry nos contará más al respecto dentro de unos segundos. 

Como sabrán si han visto mis entrevistas con Larry Wilkerson, es el ex jefe de personal de Colin Powell en el Departamento de Estado. Trabajó con Powell en el Estado Mayor Conjunto. Había estado en el Ejército durante décadas. Cualquiera que haya visto mis entrevistas con Larry sabrá que él y yo no somos fanáticos de la política exterior de los Estados Unidos ni del complejo militar-industrial de EE. UU., y diría que Larry es uno de los críticos más importantes y destacados de todo eso. 

Pero, habiendo dicho eso, hay que reconocer que, en gran medida, el Ejército estadounidense, y quizá particularmente la Marina, porque quizá serían los más afectados, han sido bastante realistas sobre la amenaza de la crisis climática. No son negadores de la ciencia del clima ni mucho menos. Dentro del aparato del Gobierno de los Estados Unidos, quizá son los que hablan más abiertamente, aparte de algunas de las agencias ambientales directas, sobre el peligro de la crisis climática. Lo hacen desde el punto de vista de cómo fortalecer y mantener el poder de la Marina de EE. UU. Pero aun así, hablan muy claramente sobre lo peligrosa que es esta situación. 

Recordemos que el Partido Republicano, que dice ser tan promilitar, y gran parte del Partido Demócrata, no tiene una política climática que refleje la urgencia de la situación, incluso después de que la Marina se lo explicase públicamente. No olvidemos que 75 millones de personas en las últimas elecciones votaron por un negacionista de la ciencia climática. 

Los medios de comunicación prestan muy poca atención a la crisis climática a no ser que haya un incendio. Incluso cuando hay incendios en California y sequías en el Medio Oeste, a veces ni siquiera mencionan las palabras cambio climático. 

Larry Wilkerson fue a una conferencia esta mañana en la que la Marina hizo sonar la alarma, y ​​nos lo va a contar. Bien, Larry, muchas gracias por acompañarnos nuevamente. 

Larry Wilkerson 

Con gusto. 

Paul Jay 

Entonces, ¿de qué se habló? 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Se habló que lo que Michael Klare escribió en su libro All Hell Breaking Loose, y lo que reconocen todos los servicios de defensa, pero particularmente la Marina, por algunas de las razones que acabas de reiterar. Por supuesto, la Marina está en el océano. La Marina se compone, después de todo, casi en su totalidad de instalaciones costeras, que están sujetas a la subida del nivel del mar. 

Esta mañana me enteré de que, al igual que con el Ejército, la sequía es una amenaza tan grande para ellos como la subida del nivel del mar. El Ejército incluso ha priorizado la sequía en la lista de las amenazas del cambio climático para ellos, y eso se debe a que las comunidades aledañas en el suroeste de los Estados Unidos, en particular, están sufriendo tanto, y probablemente seguirán sufriendo, que las instalaciones allí ubicadas también se van a ver afectadas. Entonces, la sequía es una prioridad muy alta para el Ejército y también es importante para la Marina, porque gran parte de la sequía está afectando a lugares, como San Diego, por ejemplo, que son bastiones de la Marina.

Paul Jay 

Esta mañana, después del webinar, me dijiste que pensabas que era tan bueno que tenías ganas de aplaudir. Explícanos más. ¿Cuáles son algunos de los detalles de lo que escuchaste? 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Bueno, es repugnante que el Gobierno no esté haciendo nada. El Gobierno federal, aparte del DOD [el Departamento de Defensa de los Estados Unidos] es… No debería decir nada. Están haciendo mucho más de lo que hacían hace cinco años cuando comencé a hablar sobre este asunto, pero no están haciendo lo suficiente. Biden emitió la Orden Ejecutiva, por ejemplo, que inició el Cuerpo de Cambio Climático, del cual estoy totalmente a favor. Creo que, a final de cuentas, deberemos tener un borrador para eso, y probablemente vamos a tener que poner 10-11, quizá incluso 12-13 millones de jóvenes en esto. En este momento, la Orden Ejecutiva solo admite voluntarios. Bueno, sabemos lo que hacen los voluntarios. Mira las fuerzas de voluntarios. No hay ni un solo voluntario. Es todo dinero y sobornos y todo eso. 

Pero incluso con lo que ha hecho la administración de Biden, me choca la falta de acción por parte de la burocracia civil, el liderazgo civil. Sabía que los servicios militares fueron los primeros. Sabía que hacía mucho tiempo que consideraban el cambio climático como una de las más graves amenazas. Sabía que lo veían como una amenaza existencial. Sabía que lo veían como una sangría increíble para sus presupuestos en el futuro, principalmente debido a que la asistencia humanitaria y el socorro en casos de desastre se multiplicarían por diez. Pero no sabía que eran tan metódicos en su enfoque. Quizá debería haberlo sabido. Estuve en el Grupo de Trabajo de Seguridad Climática y estaban desarrollando ese tipo de metodología, pero realmente me sorprendió esta mañana hasta qué punto la Marina de los EE. UU. está avanzada en este asunto. Nos informó el vicealmirante que encabeza… En realidad es el JON, el jefe de Operaciones Navales, experto en logística. Están enfocados en el cambio climático. Representa todo, desde lo que se llama combustible directo, por ejemplo. Quieren poder sacar combustible de una barcaza, por ejemplo, la barcaza crearía el hidrógeno o el combustible alternativo, y no sería necesario que ese combustible y el aparato para generarlo estuvieran en el buque de guerra, en la plataforma que realmente lucha por la Marina. Estaría en una barcaza en algún lugar, y atracarían junto a esa barcaza y el hidrógeno, o lo que resulte ser, se descargaría en el mecanismo de la nave que utiliza ese combustible. 

Todo tipo de innovación y trabajo con universidades. Me sorprendió un poco cuando dijo que UVA, la Universidad de Virginia, y Virginia Tech están trabajando con Yorktown, por donde solía pasar casi todas las veces que usé la carretera vieja cuando enseñaba en William and Mary. Ninguna mención de William and Mary. Así que envié un correo electrónico de inmediato al Instituto de Estudios Marítimos de Virginia y al Nuevo Instituto para la Conservación Integrada en William and Mary. ¿Por qué el almirante [Ricky Lee] Williamson no habla de esto? Es una locura. La UVA lo está haciendo. Virginia Tech lo está haciendo. Están ayudando. Así es como debe ser. 

No están haciendo nada, aparentemente, porque ni siquiera los mencionaron. Luego pasamos al doctor Mark Spector, de la Oficina de Investigaciones Navales, OIN, probablemente una de las mejores entidades de investigación en los Estados Unidos de América. Y él decía: “Necesito ayuda académica. Necesito ayuda. Entren en nuestra web y vean todos los proyectos en los que estamos trabajando. Todo, desde baterías hasta combustibles alternativos, lo que sea. Necesito su ayuda. Regístrense con nosotros y ayúdennos”. Esto es lo que debería estar sucediendo. 

Paul Jay 

Bueno, los militares ciertamente saben cómo adquirir investigación y pagar la investigación, y los militares, incluida la Marina, aunque no sé si son los peores, pero en su conjunto, el Ejército estadounidense es uno de los peores emisores de carbono del planeta. 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Absolutamente, y lo admiten abiertamente. 

Paul Jay 

Entonces, ¿qué van a hacer al respecto? No necesitan al Congreso. Supongo que necesitan financiación, pero están recibiendo montones de dinero. ¿Van a utilizar ese dinero para hacer una transición real a la sostenibilidad? 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Ya lo hacen. Cada iniciativa que el almirante Williamson y otros… Deborah Loomis, por ejemplo, asistente especial para el Cambio Climático de la Secretaría de Marina. Imagínate a un senador que tiene un asistente especial para el Cambio Climático. Todos hablaron de que esto es fundamental para hacer que la Marina sea la mejor del mundo, porque somos responsables de proteger los mares y proteger el comercio del país, etc. Por lo tanto, debemos tener una Marina que pueda operar en esta situación climática que cambia rápidamente. 

Así que ese es su objetivo número uno. No tengo ninguna objeción a eso. Para eso están. Pero al mismo tiempo, se dan cuenta de que están contribuyendo. Entonces, cada iniciativa en la que están trabajando también tiene un doble objetivo. Es mejorar la capacidad operativa, y también es reducir su parte en los problemas que tiene que enfrentar la capacidad operativa, que es el cambio climático. Así que están tratando de reducir su huella. Están tratando de reducir sus emisiones de carbono. Cada iniciativa tiene esa condición, agregar al aspecto de paliación de lo que dicen es el método dual de combatir el cambio climático. Adaptación, porque es tan tarde que vamos a tener que adaptarnos a cosas como el aumento del nivel del mar en Norfolk. No podemos detenerlo, no por completo, así que tenemos que adaptarnos. Y dos, hace cinco años no oía a nadie hablar de eso porque tenían miedo de hablar de eso. El Congreso los reprendería y quizá incluso amenazaría su presupuesto si hablaban de ello: la mitigación. Cuando hablas de mitigación, hay que hablar de la contribución humana al cambio climático, del cual la Marina y los demás servicios son un gran componente. El DOD es [inaudible 00:09:57] en la lista de naciones sería la 55, junto con Portugal o algo así. Produce muchas emisiones. Por lo tanto, tienen dos aspectos. Van tras la capacidad operativa, que es fundamental para los servicios, y al mismo tiempo, van tras esa porción, que es grande, y se dan cuenta, del problema que están creando. 

Paul Jay 

Bueno, parte de lo que están creando se basa en esta política, que ciertamente es impulsada por el Pentágono, de necesitar esta enorme huella militar global para mantener la hegemonía global de Estados Unidos, que en gran medida, creo que es un poco ridículo porque ¿cuándo fue la última vez que ganaron una guerra importante y, de todos modos, qué diablos hacen todas estas bases? Una de las formas más rápidas de reducir las emisiones del Ejército es reducir su tamaño. 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Es un argumento válido, pero es para aquellos elementos de las fuerzas armadas con los que probablemente estaría de acuerdo en esto. Soy un gran admirador de la Marina. Fui a la Escuela de Guerra Naval. Estoy, por así decirlo, inmerso en la Marina. La historia de los Estados Unidos es la historia de la Marina de los Estados Unidos en muchos aspectos, desde John Paul Jones hacia adelante. La Marina es un brazo de las fuerzas armadas que está diseñada para proteger el comercio internacional. No limita su protección del comercio internacional al comercio estadounidense. Garantiza la libertad en los mares y la capacidad operativa en esos mares, incluso para las fuerzas armadas de nuestros enemigos, pero ciertamente el comercio de nuestros amigos y neutrales. 

Esa es la esencia de la Marina. Si tuviera que eliminar el Ejército de los Estados Unidos, el último aspecto que eliminaría es la Marina por esa misma razón. Se ha argumentado que la cláusula más importante de nuestra Constitución no es lo que solemos citar, es la cláusula de comercio, porque eso es esencialmente lo que somos, una nación de comercio. Ojalá fuéramos más aún de lo que somos hoy porque nos hemos convertido en una nación de banca y finanzas más que de comercio. Eso es lo que se supone que debemos ser. Es para eso que fuimos creados. Eso es lo que [George] Washington, [Thomas] Jefferson, [Alexander] Hamilton y todos los padres fundadores pensaron que sería el poder de este país, el comercio. Se creó la Marina, y la Marina fue allende los mares para proteger ese comercio. 

En lo que a mí respecta, esa es una tarea benigna hasta que se calienta. Cuando te encuentras con alguien que quiere interrumpir ese comercio, como frente a la costa de Somalia con terroristas que querían interceptar el comercio a través del Mar Rojo, ahora mucho más importante que el Golfo Pérsico, el 60 % del comercio mundial pasa por el Mar Rojo, a través de Bab el-Mandeb y hacia el Mar Rojo, lo que protege eso es la Marina de los Estados Unidos. Me apresuro a añadir: la Marina china, la Marina italiana, pronto la Marina turca probablemente, la Marina japonesa. El grupo multinacional que se ocupó de los piratas somalíes que interceptaban el comercio era conjunto, eran siete u ocho naciones, y ahora la mayoría de esas naciones están en Djibouti por eso. 

Paul Jay 

Pero si la misión era defender el comercio, probablemente podrías deshacerte de alrededor del 75 % de ella. Quiero decir, ¿cuánto de ello es postureo en torno a Taiwán? 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Bueno, tienes razón en eso. Podrías hacer algo que creo que es absolutamente esencial. Vamos a hablar de esto en abril en el Instituto Militar Pritzker y el Museo Militar de Chicago. Es un lugar muy prestigioso donde vamos a celebrar el 50 aniversario de la fuerza de voluntarios. Pero el panel en el que voy a estar va a hablar sobre el cambio tecnológico y cómo eso podría usarse para remodelar el Ejército de los EE. UU. 

Paul Jay 

Estaba a punto de decir que he oído incluso a los neoconservadores decir que los portaaviones son simplemente objetivos flotantes que podrían eliminarse en cualquier momento. Son un despilfarro. 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Su propósito ofensivo es atacar a otros países. Ese es realmente su propósito ofensivo. Ahora, puedes decir: “Oh, no, protegen a los otros barcos de superficie que protegen el comercio en el mar y todo eso”. Diría, rápidamente: “Los submarinos pueden hacer eso”. Los submarinos pueden hacer eso fácilmente y no presentan, aparte de sus misiles balísticos, esa amenaza para los países y las personas en tierra. 

Entonces, si quisieras rediseñar el Ejército de EE. UU. para que sea más acorde con lo que pretendemos es nuestra misión en el mundo, sin duda mantendrías la Marina. Puedes pensar en los otros servicios y considerar el pasado. ¿Qué hicimos? Nuestra Marina era muy poderosa y nuestro ejército era muy muy pequeño, y ni siquiera teníamos una fuerza aérea. 

Paul Jay 

Volviendo a la conferencia, de los diversos oradores, ¿cuáles fueron sus puntos de vista sobre cuándo va a pasar todo esto? Me dijiste antes que era bastante aterrador, algunas cosas que escuchaste. Entonces, ¿qué están prediciendo y cuándo? 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Está aquí y ellos lo saben. El almirante Williamson habló, por ejemplo, sobre el único espacio de entrenamiento de aviadores navales del país, Pensacola, y que tuvieron que reconstruirlo completamente después del huracán. Estaba muy dañado, al igual que la base en el norte de Florida que el Congreso no permitió que la Marina trasladara… o que la Fuerza Aérea la trasladara. Es realmente una base de la Fuerza Aérea. No dejaron que la trasladaran, y creo que el huracán causó daños por un valor de cuatro mil millones de dólares. Por supuesto, la Fuerza Aérea quería trasladarla. No querían quedarse ahí porque ¿qué va a pasar? Habrá otro huracán. Pero ahora el Congreso, debido a su electorado en Florida, ha dicho: “No, lo reconstruirán por una suma de cuatro o cinco mil millones de dólares”. 

Eso es una locura. Eso es una locura. Querían hacer algo inteligente. Querían trasladarlo tierra adentro. Querían evitar ese riesgo, pero no, no van a poder. Lo reconstruirán con diez veces más resiliencia de la que tenía antes en cuanto a los edificios, en cuanto a cómo será la distribución, como, por ejemplo, la distribución de Guam. Ahora, si has estado en Guam últimamente, sabrás que Guam es una pesadilla estética. Esa es la forma en que lo describiría. Ha sido construido para soportar vientos de 200 nudos, por lo que todo se construye bajo, aerodinámico y austero. Es horrible desde un punto de vista estético. 

Paul Jay 

¿Explicaron cómo serán los próximos 10, 20 o 30 años? 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

En cierto sentido, sí, porque estaban hablando de que los conflictos… Vamos a ver conflictos en todo el mundo. Veremos conflictos cuya causa en parte, inicialmente, como ocurre ahora en el Sur Global, es el cambio climático. Pero entonces vas a tener un conflicto que es inducido principalmente por el cambio climático. Es decir, será tan grave que la gente va a tener que migrar. Estamos hablando de temperaturas de 45 a 55 grados Celsius, día tras día. Causará aridez de la tierra, escasez de agua, morirán cultivos, y la gente emigrará. 

Paul Jay 

Sí, cientos de millones de personas del sur que tendrán que irse al norte. ¿Qué significa eso? 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Ya está sucediendo. El New York Times solamente escribe sobre esto, e incluso The Guardian escribe sobre esto, y nadie dice, como has mencionado en tu introducción, nadie dice: “Oh, quizá estas personas se están mudando, al menos en parte, debido al cambio climático”. ¿Tú crees? Sí, por supuesto. Están abandonando Nicaragua. Honduras y Guatemala han sufrido daños enormes por huracanes. Han tenido sequía allí. Han tenido inundaciones. Es por eso que algunas de estas personas están emigrando, porque es terriblemente difícil vivir, y mucho menos trabajar y ganarse la vida. Mira Cuba. Cuba tuvo más problemas con este último huracán que con cualquier otro huracán en el pasado, y Cuba tiene mucha experiencia con los huracanes. Cuando estuve allí en 2009 y 2010, recibí informes sobre cómo hacían las cosas, y yo quería trasladar eso a Florida y a Texas. Mi problema era que Cuba puede decir: “Váyanse de su casa”, y la gente se va. En Florida, dices “Váyanse de su casa” y la mitad de la gente se queda, y luego tienes que ir a rescatarlos y arriesgar la vida de personas. Bueno, esa es nuestra democracia; esa es nuestra libertad. Pero Cuba tiene una manera mucho mejor de manejar huracanes, huracanes serios, que probablemente cualquier país del Caribe, y ciertamente mejor que nosotros. Pero no manejaron este muy bien, y no lo hicieron porque fue enorme, y han tenido muchos problemas para recuperarse. No solo los problemas habituales como los que tienen con su red eléctrica y demás, sino todo tipo de problemas que ocurrieron a causa del último huracán. 

Así que eso es un problema. Ahora, ¿has visto las estadísticas de cuántos cubanos se están yendo de Cuba? Es increíble. Es peor que el éxodo del Mariel. Es peor que toda la inmigración pasada. Hemos cambiado las leyes de Jesse Helms y Richard Burton. No puedes simplemente poner el pie en territorio estadounidense y convertirte en ciudadano estadounidense ahora. Porque hay cientos de miles de emigrantes, tienes que pasar por algún tipo de proceso. Ahora han modificado y acelerado el proceso, pero todavía tienes que pasar por el proceso. 

Paul Jay 

Pero tú crees que este aumento de la migración también está conectado con el tema del clima, con el huracán. 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Sí, lo está, parcialmente. También es parte del bloqueo a Cuba porque no hay perspectivas económicas. Te das cuenta de que el presidente Biden está volviendo a implementar algunas de las políticas del presidente Obama. Por ejemplo, acabamos de empezar a aprobar que Western Union… Puedes enviar remesas a Cuba ahora si eres un cubanoamericano que vive en Florida. 

Paul Jay 

Chomsky y muchos científicos del clima que he entrevistado, personas que son autores de los informes del PICC [Panel Intergubernamental sobre el Cambio Climático], están prediciendo esencialmente que dentro de 30, 40 años, 50 años como máximo, y quizá antes, estas líneas de tiempo son realmente impredecibles… Hay varios puntos de inflexión en la estructura climática donde todo esto podría suceder mucho más rápido. De hecho, siempre sucede más rápido que los informes del PICC. Tan pronto como sale un informe, queda obsoleto en muy poco tiempo. 

Las predicciones son esencialmente el fin de la sociedad humana organizada. La gente está usando ese tipo de lenguaje. ¿Entienden los militares que la amenaza está en ese nivel? ¿Hablan en estos términos? ¿Y les dicen a sus supuestos amos políticos que esa es la amenaza? 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Pues no sé lo que dicen en los consejos de Gobierno. Sospecho que su retórica es más bien limitada con el presidente Biden y otros como él, Tony Blinken, Jake Sullivan, etc. Pero no creo que gente como el general [Mark] Milley, el presidente del Estado Mayor Conjunto, se calle nada. Creo que el hecho de que hayan puesto el cambio climático como la amenaza futura número uno para las fuerzas armadas de los Estados Unidos debería hacer que todos los estadounidenses que dudan escuchen y tomen nota. Incluso Marjorie Taylor Greene, por muy idiota que sea. 

Paul Jay 

Entonces, ¿por qué no lo hacen? 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

No puedes enviar un billón dólares a un instrumento que alabas día tras día, que tienes sesiones especiales del Congreso para agradecer, no puedes estar haciendo eso y, luego, cuando se dan la vuelta y te dicen que la amenaza número uno para su existencia, señora, es el cambio climático, y continúas, a menos que estés mal de la cabeza como Marjorie Taylor Greene. 

Paul Jay 

Bueno, el Partido Republicano, como tú y yo hemos comentado, se ha vuelto esencialmente como una familia criminal de varias formas. La negación de la ciencia climática solo alimenta su base, y parece que les importan un bledo las consecuencias. El liderazgo del partido Demócrata, no todo el partido, desde luego, pero sí el liderazgo, por su retórica, parece que lo entienden… Incluso este último gran proyecto de ley, esta supuesta anti como se llame, no recuerdo cómo se llama, el proyecto de ley antiinflacionario, que no tenía nada que ver con la inflación, hizo más que los proyectos de ley anteriores. Pero no están machacando este mensaje que escuchaste de la Marina de que esta es la amenaza número uno. Quiero decir, China supuestamente es la amenaza número uno. Rusia es la amenaza número uno. No escuchas que el clima es la amenaza número uno en ninguno de los círculos políticos. 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Te aclararé algo referente a las fuerzas armadas. Aunque el almirante, el ayudante del secretario de la Marina y otros reiteraron que se ganó ventaja operativa por ir por delante de la curva de poder, especialmente la parte realmente nociva de la curva de poder, como, por ejemplo, la subida del nivel del mar, seguían diciendo otras cosas como: “Estamos cooperando con Vietnam. Estamos cooperando con China. Estamos cooperando con Rusia”. Hubo una historia realmente conmovedora que contó una persona de menor rango. Acababan de ser… No, no era de menor rango. Era una persona de menor rango quien contó la historia, pero fue el secretario de la Marina quien fue a Fiji a pesar de las objeciones de la Casa Blanca y el DOD y pronunció un discurso sobre el cambio climático. Dijeron que debía dar un discurso sobre la amenaza de China y todo eso. Fue a Fiji y pronunció este discurso. Cuando terminó el discurso, uno de los miembros de la audiencia de Fiji se acercó a él y le dijo: “Muchas gracias por hacer esto. Finalmente reconocen el hecho de que nos están perjudicando, y somos sus aliados”. 

Y eso es todo. Fueron al delta del Mekong en Vietnam, esto es la Marina, y están lidiando con los problemas a los que se enfrentará Vietnam con el Mekong. De repente, uno de los vietnamitas del Gobierno… Este es un Gobierno comunista, Paul, y dijo: “Tenemos muchos estudiantes que obtienen sus doctorados, y se les están ocurriendo algunas buenas ideas”. Un tiempo después, la Marina participó en las sesiones informativas de doctorado de los estudiantes de las universidades vietnamitas, y los profesores calificaban la calidad de las disertaciones de los estudiantes para ver si podían obtener más ideas sobre cómo paliar el cambio climático. 

Esto es lo que debería estar sucediendo en todo el mundo. Esto nos va a matar a todos. Chino, estadounidense, no importa. Deberíamos estar cooperando. Deberíamos estar colaborando. Esto es lo que está pasando en estos canales militares esotéricos, porque los militares entienden, en el fondo, que esto es algo a lo que todos deben contribuir. Enemigo. Amigo. Aliado mutuo. 

Paul Jay 

¿Se dijo algo de la necesidad de algún tipo de solución negociada a esta guerra en Ucrania por este motivo, para que esta conversación se trasladara al clima? 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Creo que se mantuvieron alejados de eso en este seminario web en particular porque hubiera sido una distracción del mensaje principal que querían enviar. Pero estaba el almirante Williamson, o también estaba el almirante Paul Beattie de la Marina Real del Reino Unido, y si les hablaras en privado, probablemente dirían: “Esta es la cosa más tonta sobre la faz de la tierra”. No podrían decir eso por razones políticas, pero esta guerra es una locura. Es una locura. 

Ayer también estuve en un programa del Quincy Institute, y eran las reglas de Chatham House, así que… no voy a nombrar a nadie ni nada, pero los expertos que trajimos para que nos informaran sobre la situación de Ucrania esencialmente dijeron: “Probablemente estamos hablando de dos o tres años…”. Piensa en eso un minuto. “Dos o tres años más de guerra, y luego, ambos bandos se cansarán”. Si es que podemos controlar la escalada durante esos dos o tres años, y esa es una gran pregunta. Ambas partes se mirarán y dirán: “Esto es realmente malo. Tengamos un alto el fuego negociado, y luego tendremos una zona desmilitarizada, fuerzas de paz de la ONU durante 75 años, como en Chipre, como en Pakistán, como en la frontera entre India y China, como en Corea. Tendremos 75 años de zona de distensión y un alto el fuego negociado, y eso es lo mejor que podemos hacer”. Si eso es lo mejor que podemos hacer, ciertamente estamos sufriendo en Washington, Moscú y en todas partes. 

Paul Jay 

Y ahora la política de EE. UU. es mantener un cierto nivel de armas para que los ucranianos no puedan perder. No entregar armas a un nivel que realmente amenazaría… que los rusos se vuelvan completamente locos. Así que esto sigue y sigue y sigue. 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Ahora se habla de los tanques de batalla y la presión para que Alemania les dé Leopards y que el Reino Unido les envíe Centurions y que nosotros les enviemos Abrams, lo cual es presión del complejo militar-industrial, te lo garantizo, es indicativo de cómo podría escalar en cualquier lugar en esos dos o tres años antes de que lleguemos a un alto el fuego por estancamiento. Es una mina de oro. Es el sueño de Lockheed Martin, que esto siga y siga y siga. Están ganando dinero con las municiones que van a Ucrania, y por partida doble con las municiones que regresan a los EE. UU. y las reservas de nuestros aliados que se agotaron porque mandaron municiones a Ucrania. Esto es el nirvana para ellos. 

Paul Jay 

En lo que respecta a Putin, preferiría que esto siguiera para siempre para evitar la humillación de un trato que los deje como en el 23 de febrero, porque entonces, ¿para qué murieron decenas de miles de soldados rusos? Así que es una locura por todos lados. 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Lo es. Toda esta situación es una locura. Es de locos. Pero es muy rentable. Muy rentable. También es rentable para Putin. Fíjate que las sanciones han obligado a otros países a alinearse con Rusia con respecto, particularmente, al petróleo, pero también a otras cosas. Es rentable para ellos también, a pesar de lo que decimos, porque nos gusta pensar que nuestras sanciones están funcionando, y no es así. 

Paul Jay 

Entonces, casi para concluir la entrevista, Larry, ¿hay algo más que surgió en ese seminario web del Clima de la Marina que deberíamos saber? 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Bueno, hay un poderoso mensaje que viene del individuo a cargo de la Marina, y tuve la impresión de que es a mayor escala en todo el Departamento de Defensa, lo que se llama Control de Vectores o Análisis de Vectores, las enfermedades, de eso se trata. Son las pandemias. Son cosas como el ébola en Zaire. Son operaciones realmente peligrosas dentro del clima global con respecto a las enfermedades y la transmisión de enfermedades de una población a otra. Fue algo aterrador, los gráficos que puso, y dijo que esto es lo que estamos haciendo en el llamado Sur Global. Estamos usando estos pesticidas. Esto es lo que estamos haciendo con estos pesticidas, y lo que estamos haciendo con estos pesticidas está agravando el drama y la incidencia y profundidad del cambio climático y, al mismo tiempo, el problema más importante, la imposibilidad de cultivar cualquier tipo de alimento. No solo la sequía, sino todas estas otras cosas también. 

Y luego habla de los vectores que salen de esto. El control de vectores en el Ejército consistía esencialmente en controlar ratas, porque propagan enfermedades, como bien sabes… la peste bubónica y cosas así. Bueno, el control de vectores ahora no es solo ratas. Son todas estas cosas que vienen de estos lugares y que no habrían salido de allí si el calor no hubiera llegado al nivel que ha llegado, si el capitalismo rapaz y depredador no hubiera destrozado el terreno como lo ha hecho, y si no hubiéramos tenido algunas de estas políticas y prácticas en vigor que están ahí porque les hemos robado la capacidad de tener soluciones de alta tecnología para sus problemas y están volviendo a los pesticidas realmente nocivos y cosas así para solucionar sus problemas. 

Todo esto es parte de la solución… En Fiji, se le dijo al SECNAV, como se informó en este seminario web: “La mayor parte de esto es culpa suya”. ¡Bingo! ¡Bingo! No es culpa de los isleños del Pacífico. No es culpa de Palau. No es culpa de Micronesia. No es culpa de Kiribati. Es culpa nuestra. “Somos sus aliados. ¿Qué están haciendo?”. La [diafonía 00:31:45] es culpa suya. 

Paul Jay 

¿La Marina dice estas cosas a las comisiones del Congreso? Quiero decir, ¿hablan de…? 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Esa es una buena pregunta. No sé. No sé. Es una buena pregunta. Es una buena pregunta. ¿Son tan sinceros con su supervisión del Congreso como lo fueron con nosotros en este seminario web? No sé. Espero que lo sean. 

Paul Jay 

Quizá puedas averiguarlo y hablamos de ello. 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

Yo he sido así de sincero con los miembros del Congreso, y algunos reaccionan y otros no, la mayoría están en la última categoría. 

Paul Jay 

Bueno, sería interesante averiguarlo porque, ya sabes, en teoría, deberían tener audiencias públicas, y los diversos comités de la Cámara y el Senado que supervisan a las fuerzas armadas deberían escuchar estas cosas. Si lo han hecho, supongo que es comprensible por qué lo ignoran. Porque todo lo que les importa son sus patrocinadores, a quienes no parece importarles esto. 

Lawrence Wilkerson 

El lunes iré al Capitolio con el mayor general Laich para hablar con varios miembros sobre algunos de estos temas, incluida la fuerza de voluntarios. Me aseguraré de hablarlo. 

Paul Jay 

Muy bien, muchas gracias, Larry. 

Gracias a todos por acompañarnos en theAnalysis.news. 

No olvide que hay un botón de donación en la parte superior de la página web. Puede registrar su correo electrónico en nuestra página web. En YouTube, puede suscribirse y supuestamente recibirá notificaciones. Creo que mucha gente dice que se suscribe en YouTube y YouTube no les envía notificaciones. Nuestra audiencia en todas las diversas plataformas de pódcasts es probablemente significativamente más grande, en realidad, que nuestra audiencia de YouTube. Entonces, si está escuchando en la plataforma de pódcasts, vaya al sitio web y registre su correo electrónico. 

Gracias por acompañarnos.


Select one or choose any amount to donate whatever you like
$

Never miss another story

Subscribe to theAnalysis.news - Newsletter
Name(Required)

Lawrence B. Wilkerson is a retired United States Army Colonel and former chief of staff to United States Secretary of State Colin Powell.”

theAnalysis.news theme music

written by Slim Williams for Paul Jay’s documentary film “Never-Endum-Referendum“.  

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *