Worker's Wages & Leverage are the Real Targets - Ferguson


Why did Corporate Democrats “cede” the economic argument? Are they really fighting inflation or trying to weaken workers’ bargaining power? Tom Ferguson joins Paul Jay on theAnalysis.news.


Paul Jay

Hi, I’m Paul Jay. Welcome to theAnalysis.news. The Dems, the Democratic Party, has retaken the Senate as we are speaking. It’s still not clear whether they’re going to retake the House, although most of the pundits are predicting they won’t by a slim margin. What happened and why?

We’ll be back in just a few seconds with Thomas Ferguson to discuss the results of the election, some of the economics involved, and why so many people got it wrong.

One of the things that were most frustrating for me in watching the lead-up to the elections was the way the Democratic Party, of which I am– certainly, of corporate Democrats, everyone knows that watches theAnalysis, I am no fan, but yes, as opposed to [Donald] Trump, yes, I would hold my nose and vote Democrat if I lived in a state where a Republican might actually win. As it turned out, even though I’m not even living in the U.S. anymore, I’m still registered to vote in Maryland, but given that the Democrats were going to win everything there is to win in Maryland, I didn’t vote because my nose was sore that day. All that said, I was very frustrated with the way the Democrats couldn’t even defend their economic record, which was rather pitiful but still better than the Republicans.

The basic argument the Republicans were giving– and here I’m going to show you a little clip from the Stephanopoulos show on the Sunday just before the election where Chris Christie goes on and on about how the Democrats are going to lose because they couldn’t deal with inflation. Everybody knows inflation came from the stimulus spending that was pushed through by the Democrats.

Donna Brazile

“What drives inflation? It’s not just who is in Washington, DC. This inflation is being driven by huge demand at a time we had two years of economic lockdown.” [crosstalk 00:05:59]

Chris Christie

“I’ll take Larry Summer’s word for it, okay. Larry Summers, Clinton’s Treasury Secretary, told the Biden administration two years ago, “you go ahead with the spending you’re talking about, and you are going to create enormous inflation.” It’s exactly what happened. We can try to blame it on a whole bunch of other things, but when you put $5 trillion that you printed into the economy, after all the money that we put in during COVID, that’s why you have inflation. The fact is that it’s got to stop at some point, and the Democrats don’t want to talk about that because their constituencies are all about ‘pay me more’.”

“In the end, Sarah’s right that they ceded that this round to Republicans.”

Paul Jay

Well, there are various studies, and as we get into the interview, I’ll quote one of them that shows that, in fact, at the very most, that spending may have caused maybe 3% inflation. That’s at a time when inflation was practically zero. That inflationary effect, meaning stimulus spending, money that went into people’s pockets, well, that money’s long been spent. It has very little to do with today’s inflation, yet I didn’t see Democrats defending their record.

The San Francisco Fed paper I referred to actually said that even if there was 3% inflation caused by these policies, it was better than the alternative, which was a deep recession. I didn’t hear that being said by Democratic candidates. I’m going to ask Tom why he thinks the Dems couldn’t even defend their own record when they could have actually had something positive to say about it. Before we get into that, I’m going to ask him why did so many of these polls get it wrong? Why did so many of the predictions of the results get it wrong?

Now joining me is Tom Ferguson. Tom is the director of research at the Institute for New Economic Thinking. He’s also an emeritus professor at the University of Massachusetts. Thanks for joining me, Tom.

Thomas Ferguson

Boston, please. Let’s not–

Paul Jay

I have to say Boston. Boston. University of Boston, Massachusetts, sorry. Not Amherst. Okay, here we go. Alright, so, Tom, let’s start. This isn’t the first time polling has been wrong, but it was really wrong. Even the internal polls of the Democratic Party, nobody was really expecting the Republicans to do so badly. When I say nobody, I guess I should say almost nobody. What do you think?

Thomas Ferguson

Well, okay, look, I have to tell you, first of all, we have just done Groundhog Day again, meaning in the sense of the movie, we’re rerunning what we did in 2020 with small changes. In that sense, I’m less censorious about the polls, and I would be more censorious of the pundits if you like. When you’re at this tight a set of races, it takes only a very small margin to blow you completely off. I mean, it doesn’t mean your polls are way off. It means if you’re 3% or 4% off, you got a lot of races miscalled, but it’s not that bad a deal.

On the other hand, what’s striking to me is the way you can see this– I’d be inclined to say tin-brained punditry that was just everywhere, and it’s still everywhere in telling you the meaning of the election that I am pretty sure they can’t actually discern. Mostly everybody agreed that the Democrats would get a drubbing, and they got a drubbing, actually. It’s not like things worked out wonderfully for them, but it worked out a lot better than everybody thought it was going to.

I am quite struck by the basic line, as far as I can tell, and I read this frankly, as coming from the White House, too. It is certainly reflected in things like the New York Times, particularly today, where there is no room for doubt. Just read what might be in the old days, the front page there. They’re all sitting around telling you it was a victory for middle-of-the-road candidates in this sort of happy and rosy scenario. It’s middle-of-the-road candidates in the Republican Party and middle-of-the-road candidates in the Democratic Party.

Now, a problem with this is that when you actually compare the major polls, Edison and AP-NORC, they actually differ by just enough in some key places that it’s actually hard to tell anything, particularly on the question of exactly how many women were thinking what and how they actually voted. I’m having trouble with that. I think we have to be cautious there. It seems to me a lot of people rushed to judgment.

Look, the first thing I think to be said about the economics of this election is something that, as far as I can tell, no election analyst has said, but which is obvious, which is, hey, opening the Strategic Petroleum Reserve pays. That is to say, there’s absolutely no question that inflation was heavily on the minds of voters. I’ve seen folks try to dispute that, too, using some poll data. I think that’s nonsensical.

It is clear, and I know very well from folks who were around who told me this, is that plenty of people gave [Joe] Biden the advice if they didn’t get oil prices down, he’d be toast. Well, they got them down. Now, some of that was just the fact that because of the Fed rate rises, the whole of the world now fears a recession. People stopped, the price fell, and then OPEC raised prices in response to keep its revenue up.

Still, the point is they opened the Strategic Petroleum Reserve; tell me that that’s not really important here. Before we hear all the stuff about the importance of culture and everything else, stick with that opening of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

The other point to notice is that a number of government programs in the farm belt are actually offering to buy crops at well above their existing futures prices in the market, which works out, too, for farmers. That’s not universal, but it covers a lot of crops. This type of stuff is running in the background if you like, and for sure, it’s important there.

Alright, first, one thing Biden did was defused the economic record and make it better by just turning on the pup briefly. Now, we’ll see how they rebuild that thing in the next few months. Why didn’t they defend it? Well, I think, look, the first thing to be said is it’s not easy to defend. There’s a lot of slippage on this, but the bottom line was that for most people, their wages just haven’t kept up with inflation. There are a lot of claims made about the lowest-paid workers. I think that’s a huge mistake. Not meaning that it didn’t rise, but what they were actually doing was adjusting. If they wanted any low-wage workers at all in dangerous occupations that had formerly been safe, they are now dangerous, and they have had to pay higher wages for that. I don’t think that was a general tilt, if you like, in favor of labor.

I note that in ’21, they actually lost ground in unionization. Once the Democrats came in, the rate of unionization fell back, not forward. That’s off of a BLS release I was just looking at. Anyway, the heart of the matter is, you want to understand that no matter what anybody else tells you, or the Americas is what we might call a Sunak moment in [Inaudible], that’s after the new budget, that will be brought in in a few days by the Prime Minister and the Chancellor of the Exchequer in Britain. Put bluntly, they’re going to do big budget cuts.

Now, the bottom line on that is they got to do it to keep their costs down as interest rates rise. What’s happening to every country on earth now as interest rates rise, the cost of that debt that they’ve all run up rises a lot, not a little. The U.S. is in that boat too. You could see the Republicans were actually saying it. Interestingly, as a number of folks pointed out, the media wasn’t carrying it in those last two weeks about the various Republican proposals for chopping Social Security, lowering the rate Medicare reimburses for doctors, and things like that. Now, this is close to inside baseball, which I actually despise, but it is perfectly obvious that Democrats in the White House are thinking about some of these too. Biden has a long history of talking out of both sides of his mouth on Social Security, to put it politely. The budget pressure is going to be very intense there.

I think it’s clear that, in general, the Democrats did not feel, the national Democrats didn’t feel like defending their economic record of helping people because they’re not thinking they can continue to do that. Way too quickly, they have pulled back on lots of expenditures to even measure the pandemic spread. It’s like today they’re running articles on how thousands of jobs are disappearing in public health that were temporarily funded by the CDC Foundation as part of the government there. You’ll notice– it’s quite striking the way the Biden people, and Biden himself, said the pandemic is over, but yesterday they extended the emergency rules on that which will allow them to keep spending. These folks have been cutting back for quite some time.

Paul, I’m sorry to throw raw meat to you, but I have to tell you, I agree completely with you. These folks were not defending their economic record on the spending side because most of them don’t believe it. They don’t believe it because they’re corporate Democrats.

Now here, I cannot help but observe one of those delicious ironies that it’s like this is too good to make up. Although a lot about what you’re about to read in some of these cases, the case of the crypto failure there– Samuel Bankman-Fried. This is a big centrist Democrat who– although he pretended to be a left-liberal Democrat– look where they spent the money. I’m in the process of doing that with my colleague Paul Jorgenson. And no, it’s not money. It’s mostly funded to sort of center and center-right Democrats, and it’s a lot of money. In that sense, one of the big financial props of the center did not hold there. Within days–

Paul Jay

Tom, let’s just stay on the economic thing for a second. You and I discussed this a little bit off-camera, but it seems to me that they did not want to push back on the argument that government spending was causing inflation, and the only alternative to that is austerity policies, cut back on government spending, and then supposedly higher interest rates are going to do something about inflation. Both of those things are not what’s causing inflation. If I understand it correctly, low-interest rates were not significant in this 8-9% of inflation. Government spending wasn’t significant. The two things they’re doing are going to cut back the government spending and continue raising higher interest rates. There’s another agenda going on here.

Thomas Ferguson

No, I don’t disagree that we are about to see an effort very carefully now because they’re in a much stronger position than they were. My reading is the White House thought they could blame a lot of this on the Republicans. Now they won’t be able to do that. It will be a much more difficult sell than it was all the Republicans, which the Republicans were clearly just raring to step into that role.

I have to say, in all honesty, that the other reason you would have some difficulty in pushing that line, though it’s not the controlling thing, is given the media worship of Summers and company, the people, the inflation hawks who were warning, in my view, utterly bogus claims about the role of the stimulus program. If all of your daily papers and all of the talking heads that you’re watching are saying the opposite, it’s tough for a candidate to just walk up to people and say different. In that sense, this is one of these deals where I’d like to blame– I’m not saying the system as a whole; it’s more specific than that. The major networks, the New York Times, they just all spend way too much time on Summers. They don’t look at serious counterarguments. They hardly print them, and it’s ridiculous. It’s also the case if you talk or listen to folks who have access to the White House and I occasionally bump into these people, they will say the influence of the conservative inflation hawks in the Democratic Party is quite strong, and they’re actively talking to the upper levels of the Biden White House.

Paul Jay

There was an interesting piece in the Economist, and it’s not only been there, but it kind of came out and said it. This is what I think the agenda is. It says that “we up until the pandemic…” we being the elites, “have been able to control…” quote-unquote, “core inflation.” If you read the whole article, it’s clear they mean wages. “We were able to control this because we had a reliable, cheap source of labor in China.” But two things have happened with the global supply chain. One, the pandemic has shown us that we can’t rely on this anymore the way we have. Two, the rivalry intentions with China are threatening those supply chains. Now American workers, and I should say I’ll add to that Canadian, are gaining some leverage. Is that what’s really– when I said there’s another agenda here, is that the real problem they’re trying to deal with is they don’t want the working class in North America to gain leverage here. They need to beat people down with higher interest rates and cut back social network spending, which also gives workers more confidence in terms of how they fight.

Thomas Ferguson

Okay, what I’d say is this. You got to treat even the White House as a place where a set of parties fight out stuff. The arguments inside that, if you like, it’s not the Republican Party, where as far as I can tell, there’s very little disagreement with that strategy save, curiously, on the Trump side, which likes to talk the MAGA line, about making America great again for workers, even though they do essentially nothing to make that happen and indeed do many things to make it work. There is that tension in the Republican Party, and a different kind of that version of tension is in the Democratic Party, where there is clearly a wing that is actually friendly to the workforce. The striking thing is that when you look at unionization rates after the Democrats have been in here now for almost two years, they haven’t hardly moved at all. They actually went retrograde last year. There were a lot of strikes. You hear the familiar line that “this is the friendliest president we’ve had in years for labor.” What that means is they get to come to the White House or something.

On the National Labor Relations Board that is restructured, I think, in a way that is friendly to labor. But the NLRB and elections are increasingly irrelevant to what’s happening to the bulk of the workforce, which never reaches the stage of even getting to mount a union election. You do see a raft of unsanctioned strikes from small strikes of all kinds.

You notice what the White House did. It kicked off the question of the railway contract settlement until after the election. This is going to be very interesting. I just saw where the Secretary of Labor was saying that “well, he told Biden to say there can’t be a strike.” They need to tell the employers there that sick leave and some controlled over time, especially on weekends for people, is an important issue and not just sit out there trying to quote “mediate that.” It’s obvious. Anybody who studies American railways or transportation, in general, can see just how crazily one side of these situations has been, particularly as they try to run very, very long trains with one or two people. I think you Canadians know something about that especially.

Paul Jay

I worked on the railroad for five years. I worked as a carman mechanic on the railroad for five years, and that was beginning when I was there. We were starting to wage– it was a big fight of whether you could or whether you needed a railroad worker in the van, in the caboose at the end of the train. They started getting rid of them, and they started having more accidents.

Thomas Ferguson

Yeah, well, the workers have been in the caboose for a generation or more now; that’s clear. So yeah, all right, I think we’re on the same wavelength here. Yes, I think we have this serious problem even in the Democratic White House, and I can’t wait to see how they negotiate this there. I mean, just watch the railway strike business since I think at least four of those unions have already turned down the contract, and probably some more will be coming along.

More generally, look, this problem of wages hasn’t been solved. In fact, there’s no doubt that, in general, wages have lagged well behind inflation, and that’s not going to change as a result of this election. You could say probably you’ll just continue with the policies you’ve got. I do not, myself, think that that can go on forever. Inflation does begin to start institutional changes happening because the results are so disastrous if you just stay put there. I don’t know where we go into the future here. I think it’s going to be very interesting.

Now, on the general question of inflation in the world, I would just comment this way. I don’t disagree with the Economist article, which I haven’t read, the one you just quoted. You can see that U.S. reliance, U.S. firms’ reliance on China is declining. The usual estimate is about half of the Chinese trade surplus with the United States is American firms selling back into here. It is clear to me that the combination of Taiwan’s high-tech subsidies in China and especially the COVID rules there for lockdowns included foreign firms. I mean, you know, some CEO flies into there to see how his firm is doing, and he’s going to spend ten days at a hotel that he didn’t bargain for. Well, that cooled him off. I think that has very clearly altered the top rungs of American business attitude towards China. There are still guys cheering on, “let’s invest,” but it’s a lot lower than it was.

The other side of it is the restructuring of Europe. You also see that basically strategic trade issues and decoupling are becoming much more important now. Those are going to create– they are already creating supply shocks of all types, and that’s not going to stop. It’s going to continue.

Paul Jay

Even if they move production to India, say, one, it’s going to take some time to get anywhere near what it was in China. Two, that wasn’t the biggest issue. The biggest issue is during the pandemic, they couldn’t get stuff here. The ports were so clogged up. We’re in the era of pandemics now. This ain’t going away. Every month there’s a new one coming by.

Thomas Ferguson

Yeah, that was one of the significant failures of the Biden administration. They should have generalized vaccines quickly. They should have told Pfizer and Moderna, “okay, look, you’re going to have to.” Given the amount of federal support for the background of these viruses, not necessarily to those companies at the time they had it, but the whole development of the vaccines. The whole development of the vaccine was certainly in the background. Large programs of federal support from DARPA, from the NIH, and other places there. They should have said, “ok, after you’ve made a couple billion now, give everybody access to the vaccine.” They haven’t done that. Most of everybody else’s vaccines, while they are around, they haven’t been disseminated on a wide scale. Some of them, I don’t think the Chinese or the Russian vaccines work that well.

Paul Jay

Yeah, they’re maybe 60% at best, whereas the American ones are up around 90%, if that’s all to be believed.

Thomas Ferguson

Yeah. So the result is that you’ve got a worldwide problem. In the latest round of vaccines, the take-up is not that high, even in the U.S. But it’s, of course, zero in countries with no access to it. You’ve just let this thing sit out there, and it will keep mutating. I entirely agree. This is now the biggest gambling operation in the world. It dwarfs Macao in Las Vegas and everything else. It’s like, you bet the whole planet on this policy. This is stupid.

I would add the Gates Foundation has not helped here. Bill Gates has famously opposed this vaccine. Everybody says, “what’s he doing there?” My take is that what you’re actually looking at here is an effort to make American intellectual property essentially non-negotiable. That is to say that the fundamental story here is the U.S. government and its major companies think that the intellectual property issue is so important they’re not willing to compromise on it. That’s a big mistake. On issues like this, they should just give the stuff away. It’s not like–

Paul Jay

Just to be clear, because the coin just dropped for me, what you’re saying. You mean give it away on a worldwide basis because as long as most of the world’s not vaccinated, the thing keeps mutating. It’s impossible it doesn’t come back to the United States or to North America. Over and over again, you have completely broken global supply chains which was the whole basis of globalization which means you have to keep moving more and more production back to North America, which again is going to give workers here more leverage. So you better beat the shit out of them now.

Thomas Ferguson

Well, I was surprised when I was looking at some numbers on growth in manufacturing in the United States the other day out of the St. Louis Fed. There’s rather a lot of– there’s more than I would have thought. I’m not expecting to see lots of on-shoring, except in the case of our re-onshoring, I think, except in the case of goods with a defense component and sort of basic things you need. I suspect that you will see, and I trust we will see some continuous effort to keep masks and things like that available.

Paul Jay

I saw an article. A lot of the production that goes on in China, not all but a significant part meaning FOXCOM as the best example, is actually owned by Taiwan. It’s a Taiwanese corporation. I saw that Taiwan’s planning more investment in the United States, including trying to develop some semiconductor business there.

Thomas Ferguson

We are subsidizing our semiconductor folks, especially intel, to try to do more here. In the high-tech stuff with a defense or vital part aspect, you’ll see a good deal of that, but I think you’re going to find more and more people moving to places like Vietnam. What you’re going to do is– this will sort of be a kind of– well, it calls to mind the old empires of the late 19th century where the French, the British, and eventually the Americans, late joining, create its spheres of influence. Although the American position in China was famously, “everyone should have a right to get in.” Meaning the Americans should get in too. I’m not looking for a lot of that, but you’re right, and this is going to be continuously generating trouble. It does not help that the Biden administration and the CDC have just not– they haven’t got any monitoring system in place in real-time to find out what variants are around. I mean, they find out now by looking at hospital stuff that’s two weeks old. In the sense of what the vaccine is out there by the time you get sick enough to go to the hospital–

Paul Jay

Tom, just before we finish, if you’re watching mainstream media, there’s at least been discussions about high energy prices and what that means for inflation. There’s at least been a discussion about the supply chain. The thing that’s getting very little attention, something you mentioned just a bit to me off-camera, is how high margins and profits are simply higher than usual these days, and that doesn’t get talked about very much.

Thomas Ferguson

The Biden administration has been very late on antitrust. They’re making some moves now, but they’ve been slow, and it’s probably– well, we’ll see. I wish them the best on that. There are people in charge that are serious about that, but it’s not nearly broad enough to do anything. It’s not going to constrain most companies. They were slow on that. They haven’t done anything on commodities regulations; this crypto thing that just happened. That was money mostly going to Democrats. It just blocked it.

Bill Clinton and others were all walking around saying, “how we really had to have a light touch on regulation.” No, we didn’t. A lot of people are out of vast sums of cash. It is said that relatively more blacks than whites were actually invested in cryptocurrency. I don’t know if that’s true. I don’t mean that most blacks– I’m not saying that all, just that the proportion compared is a little higher there. I think for younger folks of all types, everybody found it irresistible. I was doing my best to persuade members of the family not to do that. Look, fleming and flim-flam here are just– stock markets lend themselves to that, particularly at low rates of interest. Bubbles are the basic heart of low-interest rate policies and bad regulation. That’s just the long and the short of it. It’s now mostly the short of it.

Anyway, I think we should come back to one point, though, on this, which is the weirdness of all this. I would accept the fact that the Trump folks running in the states, if they were running fresh, usually did not do well in Secretaries of State office and things like that. Election deniers, though, in the House because their incumbents did very well. The insanity of the whole business is that, yeah, on the whole, I don’t think it was so great for Trump. I doubt that even Trump will try to claim that. You look inside the Republican Party, and it’s fairly striking. You have a serious challenge to Mitch McConnell, who was certainly the main bulwark in that party against Trump in the Senate. You’ve got even Kevin McCarthy, who is under severe threat from people who think he wasn’t friendly enough to Trump, even though we all know between this enormous gap between what he actually thought and what he did, he’s talked like a Trump person for a long time now. You may see this amazing– this development is really worth watching. In fact, inside the Republican Party, the Trump folks may, in fact, come out somewhat stronger in the congressional delegations than anybody would have guessed on election night.

Paul Jay

There’s one other factor that I think certainly mainstream media has not even touched, but I think it’s significant, which is there has been over the past eight years, nine or ten years, progressive organizations– I know better the situation in Pennsylvania, who have been bypassing the media monopolies and just knocking on doors. They’ve been knocking on doors now in Pennsylvania for close to a decade. There are three organizations that have been doing it, and there are similar or some of the same organizations across the country. To some extent, it’s really going under the radar. I think we saw some of that effect, at least in Pennsylvania and maybe in Michigan, where they recaptured the state legislature. Knocking on doors may be the new technology of the future, which is sort of funny.

Thomas Ferguson

Yeah, I’m having a hard time reading what’s going on in those. I am quite struck, for example, by the difference in the outcomes in Pennsylvania and New York. I’ve heard all kinds of noise made about this, but it is a fact that [John] Fetterman, but also the candidate for governor there, [John] Shapiro–

Paul Jay

Yeah, Shapiro.

Thomas Ferguson

— both ran well to the Left of most of the congressional delegation in New York. Not all of them, obviously, you got AOC [Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez] and people like that too. That was pretty strange. The other thing that I think people need to think about here is to look at the outcome. Compare Ohio and Michigan, where [Tom] Ryan was said to be a strong hope for Senate. He didn’t even win his own county, which I think is Mahoning down there near Youngstown and things like that. If you look at voter turnout– these are all Senate race states. We’re comparing apples with apples, not states that didn’t have Senate races or something. Compare the Senate races in Pennsylvania and the turnout in Orion, Ohio, it’s quite different. It’s also in Michigan. The Michigan turnout is eight or nine percentage points higher than the turnout in Ohio. The turnout variations here are quite marked. What is up? That may be–

Paul Jay

Well, I got to dig more into this, but I have a hunch that it’s these organizations that are not part of the Democratic Party. They’re progressive. They came into being to support progressive local candidates and were not always successful early on. I know they exist in Michigan. I know they exist in Pennsylvania. They’re funded and operating without almost no support from the Democratic Party itself at all. Maybe they didn’t exist in New York State. Maybe it was just assumed Dems would do well.

Thomas Ferguson

I know that they did to some extent in some places because I talked to some. One of them made a very interesting point to me. It might be appropriate to close on this one. At the time, the person there had actually gone down to Georgia in the runoff in 2020. Really, I guess that was 2021, just the turn of the new year that boosted the Democrats into the 50/50 tie there. He said, at the time, they were all campaigning. They were telling people, “look, if you vote for Biden, you’ll get a rise in the minimum wage.”

Now, of course, the White House never got around to that. Now, it’s fine to say that, yeah, they had a 50/50 situation, which was really 48/52, with two senators, maybe reluctant. My sense was they didn’t try very hard, and they could have done a much better job of that early on. Biden has plenty of authority to do that inside federal government contracts, and he didn’t do it. This is a problem. Now the minimum wage, the meaning of that is changing with inflation. It’s going to make the problem even more urgent in the next few years.

Paul Jay

Sorry, go ahead.

Thomas Ferguson

My reading of this is unemployment is going to go back up, and also, there are vast numbers of people out of the labor market that could be brought in with intelligent policies, especially on public health.

Paul Jay

Hang on, isn’t that the point of high-interest rates is to create more unemployment?

Thomas Ferguson

Well, we have Jerome Powell’s authority for that, right. He was pretty clear about it. Yeah, I mean, it’s just the worst form of rationing.

Paul Jay

Yeah, I just think if you want to understand both Democratic, corporate Democratic Party, and Republican Party economics, it seems to me it comes down to a very simple proposition. All of them depend on corporate money. Not just campaign money but the whole way the system works in terms of where you’re going to work when you’re out of the office and so on. If you run a business, it doesn’t matter if it’s a small, medium, or big business; you wake up in the morning with three things on your mind. How do I increase my market share? How do I produce with less workers? How do I produce with cheaper workers? Then you can worry about everything else. The whole elite is concerned about the fact that they may have to pay more money for workers, and that’s what the policies are aimed at. Am I wrong about that?

Thomas Ferguson

No, I’m, of course, shocked, shocked, shocked that you could possibly think this, especially the fact that–

Paul Jay

Yeah, really, me too. [crosstalk 00:41:01] 

Thomas Ferguson

Now, my reading is fundamentally that the stuff you’re reading in the New York Times now is quite consonant with what the White House thinks. They think that the combination of abortion and democracy is enough to break enough votes off to beat the Republicans in this Groundhog Day situation. They are already reaching out to mount their corporate campaigns for the next general election. There’s already talk of bringing in a senior business Democrat. The White House is full of senior business Democrats, and that’s just all there is to it. No, this is just–

Paul Jay

If, as many people, economists and business pundits, and so on are predicting, if these high-interest rate policies are pushing us into a deep recession, and that’s where we are in 2024, good luck with cultural issues.

Thomas Ferguson

No, this is a longer discussion, but yes, that is a serious problem. I think the Fed will relent a bit, but not quickly.

Paul Jay

Alright, we can talk about that next time we talk. Also, when you’ve got some more data because you’re a data cruncher. Thanks very much for joining me, Tom.

Thomas Ferguson

Alright, thank you.

Paul Jay

Thank you for joining us on theAnalysis.news. Please don’t forget there’s a donate button at the top of the website. Subscribe to our email list. If you’re on YouTube, make sure you subscribe, even though we’re pretty sure YouTube is not communicating with our subscribers– even people that have clicked on that little bell, so they get notified. We’re getting lots of emails that people are not getting notified. At any rate, come over to the website; that’s the most reliable way to watch theAnalysis. Thanks for joining us.

Paul Jay 

Hola, soy Paul Jay. Bienvenido a theAnalysis.news. 

Los demócratas, el Partido Demócrata, han retomado el Senado. Todavía no está claro si van a retomar la Cámara, aunque la mayoría de los expertos predicen que no será así por un estrecho margen. ¿Qué pasó y por qué? 

Volveremos en unos segundos con Thomas Ferguson para hablar de los resultados de las elecciones, algunos de los aspectos económicos relevantes y por qué tanta gente se equivocó. 

Una de las cosas que me resultaron más frustrantes en los días previos a las elecciones fue la forma en que el Partido Demócrata, y no soy fanático de los demócratas corporativos, todo el que ve theAnalysis lo sabe, pero, a diferencia de [Donald] Trump, sí, me taparía la nariz y votaría por los demócratas si viviera en un estado donde un republicano pudiera ganar. Al final resultó que, aunque ya ni siquiera vivo en los EE. UU., estoy registrado para votar en Maryland, pero dado que los demócratas iban a ganar todo lo que hay que ganar en Maryland, no voté porque me dolía la nariz ese día. 

Dicho todo esto, estaba muy frustrado con la forma en que los demócratas ni siquiera pudieron defender su historial económico, que ha sido bastante lamentable, pero aun así mejor que el de los republicanos. 

El argumento básico que proponían los republicanos… y aquí les voy a mostrar un pequeño clip del programa de Stephanopoulos el domingo justo antes de las elecciones donde Chris Christie habla y habla de que van a perder los demócratas porque no pudieron lidiar con la inflación, y todos sabemos que lo que causó la inflación fue el gasto de estímulo impulsado por los demócratas. 

“¿Qué impulsa la inflación? No se trata solo de quién está en Washington, DC. Esta inflación está siendo impulsada por una gran demanda después de dos años de confinamiento…”. [diafonía 00:05:59] 

“Le tomaré la palabra a Larry Summers, ¿de acuerdo? Larry Summers, secretario del Tesoro de Clinton, le dijo a la administración Biden hace dos años: ‘Si implementan los gastos de los que habla, van a crear una enorme inflación’. Es exactamente lo que pasó. Podemos tratar de echarle la culpa a un montón de otras cosas, pero cuando inyectas cinco billones de dólares que imprimiste en la economía, además de todo el dinero que invertimos durante el covid, es por eso que tienes inflación. El hecho es que tiene que parar en algún momento, y los demócratas no quieren hablar de eso porque sus electores solo quieren: ‘págueme más’. Al final, Sarah tiene razón en que cedieron esta ronda a los republicanos”. 

Paul Jay 

Bueno, hay varios estudios, y a medida que avanzamos en la entrevista, citaré uno de ellos, que muestran que, de hecho, como máximo, ese gasto puede haber causado quizá una inflación del 3 %. Eso es en un momento en que la inflación era prácticamente cero. Ese efecto inflacionario, es decir, el gasto de estímulo, dinero que fue a parar a los bolsillos de la gente, ese dinero se gastó hace mucho tiempo, tiene muy poco que ver con la inflación actual. 

Sin embargo, no vi a los demócratas defender su historial. Según el periódico al que me referí, la Reserva Federal de San Francisco dijo que, incluso si esas políticas causaron una inflación del 3 %, era mejor que la alternativa, que era una profunda recesión. No oí que lo dijeran los candidatos demócratas. 

Voy a preguntarle a Tom por qué cree que los demócratas ni siquiera pudieron defender esto, cuando podrían haber tenido algo positivo que decir al respecto. Antes de entrar en eso, voy a preguntarle por qué tantas de estas encuestas se equivocaron, por qué tantas de las predicciones de los resultados se equivocaron. 

Ahora me acompaña Thomas Ferguson. Tom es el director de investigación del Instituto para el Nuevo Pensamiento Económico. También es profesor emérito de la Universidad de Massachusetts. 

Gracias por acompañarme, Tom. 

Thomas Ferguson

“Boston”, por favor. No… 

Paul Jay 

Tengo que decir Boston. Boston. Universidad de Boston, Massachusetts, lo siento. No Amherst. 

Bien, aquí vamos. Muy bien, entonces, Tom, comencemos. Esta no es la primera vez que las encuestas se han equivocado, pero se equivocaron por mucho. Incluso las encuestas internas del Partido Demócrata. Nadie esperaba realmente que a los republicanos les fuera tan mal. Cuando digo nadie, supongo que debería decir casi nadie. ¿Qué piensas? 

Thomas Ferguson 

Bueno, está bien, mira, tengo que decirte… En primer lugar, hemos hecho como en la película Hechizo del tiempo, es decir, estamos repitiendo lo que hicimos en 2020 con pequeños cambios. 

En ese sentido, soy menos crítico con las encuestas, y sería más crítico con los analistas, se podría decir. Cuando tienes un conjunto de campañas tan igualadas, solo se necesita un margen muy pequeño para hacer que los resultados sean erróneos. No significa que tus encuestas estén muy equivocadas. Significa que si te equivocas por un 3 % o un 4 %, serán erróneos en muchas campañas, pero no es tan malo. 

Por otro lado, lo que me llama la atención es la forma en que puedes ver esto… Me inclinaría a decir que algunos analistas “autómatas”, los vimos en todas partes, y todavía están en todas partes, nos dicen el significado de las elecciones, que estoy bastante seguro de que en realidad no pueden discernir. Casi todo el mundo coincidía en que los demócratas recibirían una paliza, y en realidad recibieron una paliza. No les fue maravillosamente bien, pero les fue mucho mejor de lo que todos pensaban. 

Me sorprende bastante la retórica básica, por lo que puedo ver… Y me parece, francamente, que viene también de la Casa Blanca. Ciertamente se refleja en publicaciones como el New York Times, particularmente hoy, donde no hay lugar para la duda. Solo lee lo que podría ser, en los viejos tiempos, la primera página. Todos dicen que fue una victoria para los candidatos moderados en este tipo de escenario feliz y color de rosa, candidatos moderados en el Partido Republicano y candidatos moderados en el Partido Demócrata. 

Ahora, un problema con esto es que cuando realmente comparas las principales encuestas, Edison y AP-NORC, en realidad difieren tan poco en algunos lugares clave que es difícil pronunciarse, particularmente sobre la cuestión de exactamente cuántas mujeres estaban pensando qué y cómo votaron realmente. No me convence eso. Creo que tenemos que ser cautelosos. Me parece que mucha gente se apresuró a juzgar. 

Lo primero que creo que se debe decir sobre la economía de estos comicios es algo que, por lo que sé, ningún analista electoral lo ha dicho, pero que es obvio, que la apertura de la Reserva Estratégica de Petróleo dio fruto. Es decir, no hay absolutamente ninguna duda de que la inflación estaba muy presente en la mente de los votantes. He visto que se intentó disputar eso también usando algunos datos de encuestas. Creo que eso es una tontería. Está claro, y lo sé muy bien de gente que estaba allí y me dijo esto, que mucha gente aconsejó a [Joe] Biden que si no bajaban los precios del petróleo, estaría acabado. Bueno, los bajaron. 

Ahora, algo de eso fue solo el hecho de que, debido a las subidas de tipos de la Fed, ahora todo el mundo teme una recesión. Entonces… La gente dejó… El precio cayó, y luego la OPEP elevó los precios como respuesta para mantener altos sus ingresos. Como sea, el hecho es que abrieron la Reserva Estratégica de Petróleo, y eso es realmente importante aquí. Antes de escuchar todo lo relacionado con la importancia de la cultura y todo lo demás, fíjate en esa apertura de la Reserva Estratégica de Petróleo. 

El otro punto a tener en cuenta es que una serie de programas gubernamentales en el cinturón agrícola en realidad están ofreciendo comprar cultivos a precios muy por encima de los precios de futuros existentes en el mercado. Eso también les viene bien a los agricultores. Esto no es universal, pero cubre muchos cultivos. Este tipo de cosas suceden en segundo plano, por así decirlo, y por supuesto, son importantes. 

Ahora bien, primero, una cosa que hizo Biden fue enfriar el tema económico y mejorarlo simplemente al abrir el grifo brevemente. Veremos cómo reconstruyen esto en los próximos meses. 

Pero ¿por qué no lo defendieron? Bueno, yo creo… Lo primero que hay que decir es que no es fácil de defender. Hay mucha diferencia en esto, pero lo importante fue que para la mayoría de las personas, sus salarios simplemente no han seguido el ritmo de la inflación. Hay muchas afirmaciones sobre los trabajadores peor pagados. Creo que es un gran error. No es que los salarios sean más altos, sino que se han ajustado. Si querían trabajadores de bajos salarios en ocupaciones peligrosas que antes eran seguras y ahora son peligrosas, han tenido que pagar salarios más altos por eso. 

No creo que haya sido una tendencia general, por así decirlo, a favor de los trabajadores. En el 21, en realidad perdieron terreno en la sindicalización. Una vez que entraron los demócratas, la tasa de sindicalización retrocedió, no avanzó. Eso es de un comunicado de la BLS [Oficina de Estadísticas Laborales]. 

De todos modos, el meollo del asunto es… Hay que entender que, sin importar lo que te digan los demás, en Estados Unidos se acerca lo que podríamos llamar el momento Sunak, eso es después del nuevo presupuesto, que presentará en unos días el primer ministro y el ministro de Hacienda de Gran Bretaña. Dicho sin rodeos, van a hacer grandes recortes presupuestarios. Ahora bien, la conclusión es que tienen que hacerlo para mantener sus costes bajos dado el aumento de las tasas de interés. ¿Qué les está pasando a todos los países del mundo ahora que las tasas de interés aumentan? El costo de esa deuda que todos han acumulado sube mucho, no poco. Estados Unidos también está en ese barco. 

Se podía ver… Los republicanos en realidad lo han dicho. Curiosamente, como señalaron varias personas, aunque los medios no lo han mencionado en esas últimas dos semanas, las diversas propuestas republicanas para eliminar la Seguridad Social, reducir la tasa que Medicare reembolsa a los médicos y cosas por el estilo. 

Ahora… Esto es información muy secreta, algo que en realidad desprecio, pero es perfectamente obvio que los demócratas en la Casa Blanca también están pensando en esto. Biden suele tener un doble discurso por decirlo educadamente, sobre la Seguridad Social. La presión presupuestaria va a ser muy intensa. 

Creo que está claro que, en general, los demócratas nacionales no quisieron defender su historial económico de ayudar a la gente porque no creen que puedan seguir haciéndolo. Han retirado demasiado rápidamente muchos gastos, incluso solo para medir la propagación de la pandemia. Hoy se están publicando artículos de que están desapareciendo miles de puestos de trabajo en la sanidad pública que estaban temporalmente financiados por la Fundación CDC como parte del Gobierno. Notarán… Es bastante sorprendente la forma en que la gente de Biden, y el propio Biden, dijo… Ya pasó la pandemia, pero ayer extendieron las reglas de emergencia al respecto, lo que les permitirá seguir gastando. Estas personas han estado recortando durante bastante tiempo. 

Paul, siento tirarte carne cruda, pero tengo que decirte que estoy totalmente de acuerdo contigo. Estas personas no estaban defendiendo su historial económico en el lado del gasto porque la mayoría de ellos no lo cree. No lo creen porque son demócratas corporativos. 

Ahora bien, no puedo dejar de observar una de esas deliciosas ironías que es demasiado buena para inventarla. Aunque mucho sobre lo que vas a leer en algunos de estos casos, el caso de la bancarrota de la casa de cambio… Samuel Bankman-Fried. Se trata de un gran demócrata centrista que, a través de… Aunque pretendía ser un demócrata liberal de izquierda… mira dónde gastaron el dinero. Estoy haciendo esto con mi colega Paul Jorgenson. Y no, no es dinero… Estaban financiando principalmente al tipo de demócratas de centro y centro-derecha, y es mucho dinero. En ese sentido, uno de los grandes puntales económicos del centro no aguantó. A los pocos días… 

Paul Jay 

Tom, detengámonos en lo económico un segundo. Tú y yo hablamos de esto un poco fuera de cámara, pero me parece que no querían contradecir el argumento de que el gasto público estaba causando inflación, y la única alternativa a eso es políticas de austeridad, recortes en el gasto público, y luego, supuestamente, las tasas de interés más altas van a paliar la inflación. 

Estas dos cosas no son las que están causando la inflación. Si lo entiendo bien, las bajas tasas de interés no fueron significativas en este 8-9 % de inflación. El gasto público no fue significativo. Las dos cosas que están haciendo son recortar el gasto público y seguir elevando las tasas de interés. Aquí hay algún otro plan oculto. 

Thomas Ferguson 

No estoy en desacuerdo con que vamos a ver un esfuerzo, con mucho cuidado ahora, porque están en una posición mucho más fuerte de lo que estaban. 

Entiendo que la Casa Blanca pensó que podrían culpar a los republicanos. Ahora no podrán hacer eso. Será mucho más difícil venderlo de lo que fue para todos los republicanos, que los republicanos claramente estaban ansiosos por asumir ese papel. 

Tengo que decir con toda franqueza que la otra razón por la que podrían tener alguna dificultad para defender esto, aunque no es lo de controlar, es que, dado el culto mediático a Summers y compañía, la gente, los halcones de la inflación, que advertían… afirmaciones completamente falsas en mi opinión sobre el papel del programa de estímulo. Si todos los periódicos y todos los bustos parlantes que estás viendo están diciendo lo contrario, es difícil para un candidato acercarse a la gente y decir lo contrario. 

En ese sentido, esto es algo en lo que me gustaría culpar… No estoy hablando del sistema como un todo, es más específico que eso. Las principales cadenas, el New York Times, simplemente dedican demasiado tiempo a Summers. No consideran contraargumentos serios. Casi nunca los imprimen, y es ridículo. También es el caso, si hablas o escuchas a personas que tienen acceso a la Casa Blanca, y ocasionalmente hablo con estas personas, dirán que la influencia de los halcones de la inflación conservadores en el Partido Demócrata es bastante fuerte y están hablando activamente con los niveles superiores de la Casa Blanca de Biden. 

Paul Jay 

Salió un artículo interesante en The Economist, y no solo ha aparecido allí, pero lo expuso claramente. Esto es lo que creo que es el plan. Dice que “nosotros, hasta la pandemia…”, siendo “nosotros” las élites, “hemos sido capaces de controlar…” entre comillas, “la inflación subyacente”. Si lees el artículo completo, está claro que se refieren a los salarios. “Pudimos controlar esto porque teníamos una fuente de mano de obra fiable y barata en China”. 

Pero dos cosas han sucedido con la cadena de suministro global. Una, la pandemia nos ha mostrado que ya no podemos confiar en esto como hasta ahora. Dos, las intenciones de rivalidad con China amenazan esas cadenas de suministro. 

Ahora los trabajadores estadounidenses, y debo decir, los canadienses, están ganando algo de poder. ¿Es eso lo que realmente…? Cuando dije que hay otro plan aquí, es que el verdadero problema que están tratando de resolver es que no quieren que la clase obrera de América del Norte gane influencia aquí. Necesitan aplastar a la gente con tasas de interés más altas y recortar el gasto social, lo que también da más confianza a los trabajadores en términos de cómo luchan. 

Thomas Ferguson 

Bueno, lo que yo diría es esto. Tienes que tratar incluso a la Casa Blanca como un lugar donde un conjunto de personas pelean para conseguir cosas. Los argumentos dentro de eso, si quieres… No es el Partido Republicano, donde por lo que puedo decir es que hay muy poco desacuerdo con esa estrategia salvo, curiosamente, del lado de Trump, a quien le gusta predicar la retórica MAGA, sobre hacer que Estados Unidos vuelva a ser grande para los trabajadores, a pesar de que esencialmente no hacen nada para hacer que eso suceda y, de hecho, hacen muchas cosas para que funcione. Existe esa tensión en el Partido Republicano. Esa tensión es un tipo diferente de tensión que en el Partido Demócrata, donde claramente hay un ala que está realmente en pro de la fuerza laboral. 

Lo sorprendente es que, cuando miras las tasas de sindicalización después de casi dos años de Gobierno demócrata, apenas se han movido. De hecho, retrocedieron el año pasado. Hubo muchas huelgas. Escuchas la retórica familiar de que “este es el presidente más favorable a los trabajadores en años”. Lo que eso significa es que pueden ir a la Casa Blanca o algo así. 

La Junta Nacional de Relaciones Laborales sí la han reestructurado, creo, de una manera que sea favorable a los trabajadores. Pero la NLRB [Junta Nacional de Relaciones Obreras] y las elecciones son cada vez más irrelevantes para lo que le está sucediendo a la mayor parte de la fuerza laboral, que nunca llega a la etapa de organizar una elección sindical. Sí ves una gran cantidad de huelgas no autorizadas, pequeñas huelgas de todo tipo. 

Te das cuenta de lo que hizo la Casa Blanca. Aplazó la cuestión de la liquidación del contrato ferroviario hasta después de las elecciones. Esto va a ser muy interesante. Acabo de ver que el ministro de Trabajo estaba diciendo que le dijo a Biden que dijera que no puede haber una huelga. Hay que decirles a los empresarios que las bajas por enfermedad y algún control de los horarios, especialmente los fines de semana, para las personas, es un tema importante, y no basta con sentarse ahí tratando de, cito, “mediar eso”. 

Es obvio. Cualquiera que estudie los ferrocarriles o el transporte, en general, puede ver lo loco que ha sido un lado de estas situaciones, particularmente porque intentan hacer funcionar trenes muy muy largos con una o dos personas. Creo que los canadienses saben algo sobre eso especialmente. 

Paul Jay 

Trabajé en el ferrocarril durante cinco años, trabajé como mecánico de locomotoras en el ferrocarril durante cinco años, y eso estaba comenzando cuando yo estaba allí. Estábamos empezando… Fue una gran pelea sobre si se necesitaba un trabajador ferroviario en el vagón de cola al final del tren. Empezaron a deshacerse de ellos y empezaron a tener más accidentes. 

Thomas Ferguson 

Los trabajadores han estado en el vagón de cola desde hace una generación o más, eso está claro.

Entonces, sí, creo que estamos en la misma longitud de onda. Sí, creo que tenemos este grave problema incluso en la Casa Blanca demócrata, y estoy deseando ver cómo negocian esto. Quiero decir, solo mira el asunto de la huelga ferroviaria, ya que creo que por lo menos cuatro de esos sindicatos ya rechazaron el contrato y probablemente vendrán algunos más. 

Más en general, este problema de los salarios no se ha resuelto. De hecho, no hay duda de que, en general, los salarios se han quedado muy por detrás de la inflación, y eso no va a cambiar como resultado de esta elección. Diría que probablemente continuará con las mismas políticas. 

Yo no creo que eso pueda durar para siempre. La inflación comienza a galvanizar los cambios institucionales porque los resultados son desastrosos si te quedas ahí. No sé hacia dónde nos dirigimos en el futuro. Creo que va a ser muy interesante. 

Ahora, sobre la cuestión general de la inflación en el mundo, solo comentaría esto. No estoy en desacuerdo con el artículo de The Economist, que no he leído, el que acabas de citar. Puedes ver que la dependencia de las empresas estadounidenses de China está disminuyendo. La estimación habitual es que aproximadamente la mitad del superávit comercial chino con los Estados Unidos lo constituyen empresas estadounidenses que vuelven a vender aquí. Para mí está claro que la combinación de los subsidios de alta tecnología de Taiwán en China y especialmente, las reglas del confinamiento, que incluían empresas extranjeras… Quiero decir, un CEO se traslada allí para ver cómo le está yendo a su empresa y se ve obligado a pasar diez días en un hotel. Bueno, eso lo enfrió. Creo que eso ha alterado muy claramente la actitud de los peldaños más altos de las empresas estadounidenses hacia China. Todavía algunos dicen: “Vamos a invertir”, pero es mucho más bajo de lo que era. 

La otra cara es la reestructuración de Europa. También, básicamente, las cuestiones comerciales estratégicas y el desacoplamiento se están volviendo mucho más importantes ahora. Estas van a crear… ya están creando, conmociones de la oferta de todo tipo, y eso no va a parar. Va a continuar. 

Paul Jay 

Incluso si trasladan la producción a la India, por ejemplo, uno, llevará algún tiempo acercarse a lo que era en China, y dos, ese no era el mayor problema. El mayor problema es que durante la pandemia no podían exportar. Los puertos estaban obstruidos. Ahora estamos en la era de las pandemias. Esto no va a desaparecer. Cada mes llega una nueva.

Thomas Ferguson 

Sí, ese fue uno de los fracasos significativos de la administración Biden. Deberían haber generalizado las vacunas rápidamente. Deberían haberle dicho a Pfizer y Moderna: “Está bien, van a tener que…”. Dada la cantidad de apoyo federal para lo relacionado con estos virus… No necesariamente a esas empresas en el momento en que lo tenían, sino todo el desarrollo de las vacunas. Sin duda, todo el desarrollo de la vacuna quedó en un segundo plano. Grandes programas de apoyo federal de DARPA [Agencia de Proyectos de Investigación Avanzados de Defensa], del NIH [Instituto Nacional de la Salud] y de otros lugares. Deberían haber dicho: “Está bien, han ganado un par de miles de millones, ahora proporcionen la vacuna a todo el mundo.” No han hecho eso. La mayoría de las vacunas de todos los demás, aunque aún existen, no se han difundido a gran escala. Algunas de ellas, como las chinas o rusas, no creo que funcionen muy bien. 

Paul Jay 

Sí, quizá estén en un 60 % en el mejor de los casos, mientras que las estadounidenses han subido alrededor del 90 %. Si nos creemos los informes. 

Thomas Ferguson 

Sí. El resultado es que tienes un problema mundial. La aplicación de la última ronda de vacunas no es tan alta incluso en los EE. UU. Pero es, por supuesto, cero en países sin acceso a ellas. Hemos dejado a este virus pululando por ahí y seguirá mutando. Estoy totalmente de acuerdo. Esta es ahora la operación de apuestas más grande del mundo. Eclipsa a Macao y Las Vegas y todo lo demás. Es como si apostaras todo el planeta a esta política. Es estúpido. 

Agregaría que la Fundación Gates no ha ayudado aquí. Bill Gates se ha opuesto a esta vacuna. Nadie entiende qué está haciendo. Mi opinión es que lo que realmente vemos aquí es un esfuerzo por hacer que la propiedad intelectual estadounidense sea esencialmente no negociable. Es decir, que la historia fundamental aquí es que el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos y sus principales empresas piensan que el tema de la propiedad intelectual es altamente importante, no están dispuestos a ceder en eso. Eso es un gran error. En temas como este, deberían simplemente regalarlas. No es que… 

Paul Jay 

Para que quede claro, porque acabo de caer en lo que estás diciendo. Te refieres a regalarlas a nivel mundial porque mientras la mayor parte del mundo no esté vacunada el virus seguirá mutando. Es imposible que no regrese a los Estados Unidos o a Norteamérica. 

Thomas Ferguson 

Sí. 

Paul Jay 

Una y otra vez vemos la disrupción de las cadenas de suministro globales, que fue toda la base de la globalización, lo que significa que hay que volver a traer la producción a Norteamérica, lo que nuevamente les dará a los trabajadores aquí más poder. Así que tienes que aplastarlos ahora. 

Thomas Ferguson 

Bueno, me sorprendí cuando estaba mirando algunas cifras de la Reserva Federal de St. Louis sobre el crecimiento en la manufactura en los Estados Unidos. Hay bastante… hay más de lo que hubiera pensado. Pero no espero ver mucha reubicación de la producción, excepto dentro de nuestras fronteras, creo. Excepto en el caso de productos con un componente de defensa y cosas básicas que la gente necesita. Sospecho que veremos, confío en que veremos, algún esfuerzo continuado por mantener disponibles las mascarillas y cosas así. 

Paul Jay 

Vi un artículo… Gran parte de la producción en China, no toda, pero sí una parte significativa… FOXCOM es el mejor ejemplo, en realidad es propiedad de Taiwán. Es una corporación taiwanesa. Vi que Taiwán está planeando más inversiones en los Estados Unidos, incluyendo tratar de desarrollar semiconductores. 

Thomas Ferguson 

Estamos subsidiando a nuestras empresas de semiconductores, especialmente Intel, para tratar de hacer más aquí. En el ámbito de alta tecnología, en la defensa… o piezas de importancia vital, veremos mucho de eso, pero creo que más y más empresas se irán a lugares como Vietnam. Lo que vas a hacer es… Esto será una especie de… Bueno, me recuerda a los viejos imperios de finales del siglo XIX, donde los franceses, los británicos y, finalmente, los estadounidenses, adhiriéndose tardíamente, crean allí sus esferas de influencia. Aunque la posición estadounidense en China fue, notablemente: “Todo el mundo debería tener derecho a entrar”. Y los estadounidenses también. 

No creo que eso pase, pero tienes razón, y esto va a generar problemas continuamente. Y no ayuda que la administración Biden y el CDC [Centro para el Control de Enfermedades], no cuentan con ningún sistema de monitoreo en tiempo real para averiguar qué variantes existen. Lo descubren ahora mirando datos de hospitales de hace dos semanas. Para cuando estés lo suficientemente enfermo como para ir al hospital… 

Paul Jay 

Tom, casi para terminar, en los principales medios de comunicación, al menos se ha hablado de los altos precios de la energía y lo que eso significa para la inflación. Al menos se ha hablado de la cadena de suministro. Pero lo que está recibiendo muy poca atención, algo que me mencionaste fuera de cámara, es que los márgenes y las ganancias son simplemente más altos de lo habitual estos días, y de eso no se habla mucho. 

Thomas Ferguson 

La administración de Biden ha llegado muy tarde en materia antimonopolio. Están haciendo algo ahora, pero han sido lentos y es probable que… Bueno, ya veremos. Les deseo lo mejor en eso. Hay gente al cargo que se lo toma en serio, pero no es lo suficientemente amplio como para tener un efecto. No va a contener a la mayoría de las empresas. Han sido lentos en eso. No han hecho nada sobre las regulaciones de los productos básicos. Lo que acaba de suceder con la criptomoneda. La mayoría del dinero fue a parar a los demócratas. Simplemente lo bloqueó. 

Bill Clinton y otros andaban diciendo que realmente teníamos que tener un enfoque ligero a la regulación. No era así. Mucha gente ha perdido grandes sumas de dinero. Se dice que relativamente más negros que blancos realmente invirtieron en criptomonedas. No sé si eso es cierto. No quiero decir que la mayoría de los negros… No estoy diciendo que todos, solo que la proporción es un poco más alta allí. Creo que para los jóvenes de todo tipo, todo el mundo lo encontró irresistible. Hice todo lo posible para persuadir a los miembros de mi familia de que no lo hicieran. 

Mira, este cambio de política… Los mercados bursátiles se prestan a eso, y particularmente a bajas tasas de interés. Las burbujas son la base de las políticas de tipos de interés bajos y la mala regulación. A esto se reduce todo. Y ahora es muy reducida. 

Bueno, creo que deberíamos volver a un punto en esto, que es lo raro de todo esto. Aceptaría el hecho de que a la gente de Trump que se presentan como candidatos, si no estaban ya ocupando el puesto, por lo general no les fue bien en la campaña a secretarios de Estado y cosas por el estilo. Sin embargo, a los que niegan las elecciones, en la Cámara les fue muy bien. 

La locura de todo el asunto es que, en general, no creo que fuera muy bueno para Trump. Dudo que incluso Trump intente afirmar eso. Pero si miras en el Partido Republicano, es bastante llamativo. Vemos un serio desafío a Mitch McConnell, quien sin duda fue el principal baluarte de ese partido contra Trump en el Senado. Incluso Kevin McCarthy, que está bajo una grave amenaza de personas que piensan que no fue lo suficientemente amable con Trump, aunque todos sabemos que hay mucha distancia entre lo que realmente pensaba y lo que hacía, ha hablado como una persona de Trump durante mucho tiempo. Es posible ver esta increíble… Realmente vale la pena ver esto. De hecho, dentro del Partido Republicano, la gente de Trump puede salir un poco más fuerte en las delegaciones del Congreso de lo que nadie hubiera imaginado la noche de las elecciones. 

Paul Jay 

Hay otro factor que creo… ciertamente, los principales medios de comunicación ni siquiera lo han tocado, pero creo que es significativo. Ha habido en los últimos ocho años, nueve o diez años, organizaciones progresistas… Conozco mejor la situación en Pensilvania. Han obviado los monopolios mediáticos y simplemente han ido de puerta en puerta. Han ido de puerta en puerta en Pensilvania durante casi una década. Hay tres organizaciones que lo han estado haciendo, y hay organizaciones similares, o algunas de las mismas, en todo el país. Hasta cierto punto, realmente pasa desapercibido. Creo que vimos algo de ese efecto, al menos en Pensilvania y quizá en Míchigan, donde recuperaron la legislatura estatal. Ir de puerta en puerta puede ser la nueva tecnología del futuro, lo cual es divertido. 

Thomas Ferguson 

Sí, me está costando mucho interpretar lo que está pasando ahí. Me llama bastante la atención, por ejemplo, la diferencia en los resultados en Pensilvania y Nueva York. He oído todo tipo de comentarios, pero es un hecho que [John] Fetterman, pero también el candidato a gobernador allí, [John] Shapiro… 

Paul Jay 

Sí, Shapiro. 

Thomas Ferguson

Ambos se ubicaron a la izquierda de la mayoría de la delegación del Congreso en Nueva York. No todos, obviamente, vemos a AOC [Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez] y otra gente. Eso fue bastante extraño. 

La otra cosa que creo que habría que hacer es mirar el resultado. Compara Ohio y Míchigan, donde se decía que Ryan era una gran esperanza para el Senado. Ni siquiera ganó su propio condado, que creo que es Mahoning, cerca de Youngstown, y cosas así. En los estados que presentaban candidatos para el Senado, para comparar manzanas con manzanas, no estados que no presentaban candidatos para el Senado. Compara las campañas por el Senado en Pensilvania, y la participación en Orion, Ohio, es bastante diferente. También lo es en Míchigan. La participación en Míchigan es ocho o nueve puntos porcentuales más alta que la participación en Ohio. Las variaciones de participación aquí son bastante marcadas. ¿Qué pasa? Podría ser… 

Paul Jay 

Bueno, tengo que profundizar más en esto, pero tengo el presentimiento de que estas organizaciones, que no son parte del Partido Demócrata, son progresistas, surgieron para apoyar a los candidatos locales progresistas, y no siempre tuvieron éxito desde el principio. Sé que existen en Míchigan. Sé que existen en Pensilvania. Están financiadas y funcionan sin casi ningún apoyo del propio Partido Demócrata. Quizá no existían en el estado de Nueva York. Quizá se asumió que a los demócratas les iría bien. 

Thomas Ferguson 

Sé que lo hicieron hasta cierto punto en algunos lugares porque hablé con algunos. Uno de ellos dijo algo muy interesante para mí. Podría ser apropiado cerrar con esto. En ese momento, esta persona en realidad había ido a Georgia en la segunda vuelta en 2020. Supongo que eso fue en 2021, justo en el año nuevo. Eso dio a los demócratas un empate de un 50/50 allí. Dijo que, en ese momento, todos estaban haciendo campaña. Le decían a la gente: “Mire, si vota por Biden, obtendrá un aumento en el salario mínimo”. Por supuesto, la Casa Blanca nunca lo hizo. Pero está bien decir que sí, tenían una situación del 50/50, que en realidad fue 48/52, con dos senadores, quizá reacios… Mi sensación fue que no se esforzaron mucho, y podrían haberlo hecho mucho mejor desde el principio. Biden tiene suficiente autoridad para hacer eso dentro de los contratos del Gobierno federal, y no lo hizo. 

Esto es un problema. Ahora el salario mínimo, el significado de eso, está cambiando con la inflación. Va a hacer que el problema sea aún más urgente en los próximos años. 

Paul Jay 

Lo siento, adelante. 

Thomas Ferguson 

Yo interpreto que el desempleo va a volver a subir, y también hay un gran número de personas fuera del mercado laboral que podrían incluirse con políticas inteligentes, especialmente en salud pública. 

Paul Jay 

Espera, ¿no es ese el objetivo de las altas tasas de interés, crear más desempleo? 

Thomas Ferguson 

Bueno, tenemos la autoridad de Jerome Powell para eso, ¿verdad? Él fue bastante claro al respecto. Sí, quiero decir, es la peor forma de racionamiento. 

Paul Jay 

Sí, solo creo que si quieres entender la economía tanto del Partido Demócrata corporativo como la del Partido Republicano, me parece que todo se reduce a una proposición muy simple. Todos ellos dependen del dinero de las empresas, no solo la campaña, sino todo el sistema, en términos de dónde vas a trabajar cuando dejes el cargo y todo eso. Si tienes un negocio, no importa si es una pequeña, mediana o gran empresa, te despiertas por la mañana con tres cosas en mente: ¿Cómo puedo aumentar mi cuota de mercado? ¿Cómo produzco con menos trabajadores? ¿Cómo produzco con trabajadores más baratos? Entonces puedes preocuparte por todo lo demás. 

Toda la élite está preocupada por el hecho de que quizá tengan que pagar más dinero a los trabajadores, y eso es a lo que apuntan las políticas. ¿Me equivoco en eso? 

Thomas Ferguson 

No, estoy, por supuesto, sorprendido, sorprendido, sorprendido, de que puedas pensar esto, especialmente… 

Paul Jay 

Sí, yo también. 

Thomas Ferguson

[diafonía 00:41:01] …a ambos lados. Ahora, mi lectura es fundamentalmente que lo que estás leyendo en el New York Times ahora está bastante en consonancia con lo que piensa la Casa Blanca. Creen que la combinación del aborto y la democracia es suficiente para atraer suficientes votos para vencer a los republicanos en esta situación de Hechizo del tiempo. Ya están empezando a montar sus campañas corporativas para las próximas elecciones generales. Ya se habla de traer a un demócrata empresarial de alto nivel. La Casa Blanca está llena de demócratas empresariales de alto nivel, y a eso se reduce todo. No, esto es solo… 

Paul Jay 

Si, como mucha gente, economistas y expertos en negocios, etc., están prediciendo, si estas políticas de tasas de interés altas nos están empujando a una recesión profunda, y ocurre eso en 2024, suerte con los temas culturales. 

Thomas Ferguson 

No, esta es una discusión más larga, pero sí, es un problema serio. Creo que la Fed cederá un poco, pero no rápidamente. 

Paul Jay 

Muy bien, podemos hablar de eso la próxima vez que hablemos. También cuando tengas más datos, porque eres un triturador de datos. Muchas gracias por acompañarme, Tom. 

Thomas Ferguson 

Muy bien, gracias. 

Paul Jay 

Y gracias por acompañarnos en theAnalysis.news. Por favor, no olvide que hay un botón de donar en la parte superior del sitio web. Registre su correo electrónico. Si está en YouTube, suscríbase, aunque estamos bastante seguros de que YouTube no alerta a nuestros suscriptores, aun si han hecho clic en la campanita, para que reciban una notificación. Recibimos muchos correos electrónicos de que no se notifica a la gente. En cualquier caso, visite el sitio web, esa es la forma más segura de ver theAnalysis. Gracias por acompañarnos.


Select one or choose any amount to donate whatever you like
$

Never miss another story

Subscribe to theAnalysis.news - Newsletter
Name(Required)

Thomas Ferguson is an American political scientist and author who writes on politics and economics, often within a historical perspective.”

theAnalysis.news theme music

written by Slim Williams for Paul Jay’s documentary film “Never-Endum-Referendum“.  

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *