Author: Gregory Wilpert

Burying Neoliberalism in Chile

Burying Neoliberalism in Chile

Gabriel Boric was elected president of Chile on December 20th – probably the most leftist president Chile has elected since Salvador Allende in 1970. Boric promised that while Chile was neoliberalism’s birthplace under Dictator Pinochet, it will now be neoliberalism’s burial place as well. Patricio Zamorano, a Chilean political analyst and director of the Council on Hemispheric Affairs (COHA.org) talks about what we can expect from a Boric presidency.

Honduras: The End of the Nightmare?

Honduras: The End of the Nightmare?

The election of the leftist Xiomara Castro as Honduras’s first female president means a significant rupture with the country’s recent right-wing – even fascist – past, says Center for the Americas director Laura Carlsen. However, whether Castro will be allowed to actually govern is another question, given that the state is deeply embedded in corruption and drug trafficking.

A World Without Police
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A World Without Police

Geo Maher, the author of the just-released book, A World Without Police, talks about why the police are actually designed not to do what we think they are supposed to do, to “serve and protect” the general public, but actually serve and protect property owners and more generally those who benefit from racism and inequality. He goes on to outline what a world without police could look like.

A Second Pink Tide in Latin America? – Pt 2/2

A Second Pink Tide in Latin America? – Pt 2/2

With the left’s recent electoral successes in Peru and Bolivia, and previously in Mexico and Argentina, does this mean that there is a second so-called “Pink Tide” in Latin America? If so, how do we make sense of the first Pink Tide, its successes and failures, and what might Latin America’s left have learned from the first tide, as it gets ready to take power in several countries? RenĂ© Rojas, professor at SUNY Binghamton, and Hilary Goodfriend, of Jacobin Magazine Latin America, argue that while the left needs a clearer economic plan, it is at an advantage at the moment because of the right’s disarray across the region.

US Institutions Encourage Coup Impunity in Bolivia
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US Institutions Encourage Coup Impunity in Bolivia

As Bolivia’s new government under Luis Arce prepares to prosecute the people behind the 2019 coup against Evo Morales, prominent US institutions such as Human Rights Watch, Washington Post, and the State Department urge Arce not to move against them. Ollie Vargas, a journalist and analyst based in Bolivia, says the prosecution is essential at a time when coups are back in vogue in Latin America.

A Second Pink Tide in Latin America? – Pt 1/2
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A Second Pink Tide in Latin America? – Pt 1/2

With the left’s recent electoral successes in Peru and Bolivia, and previously in Mexico and Argentina, does this mean that there is a second so-called “Pink Tide” in Latin America? If so, how do we make sense of the first Pink Tide, its successes and failures, and what might Latin America’s left have learned from the first tide, as it gets ready to take power in several countries? RenĂ© Rojas, professor at SUNY Binghamton, and Hilary Goodfriend, of Jacobin Magazine Latin America, argue that while the left needs a clearer economic plan, it is at an advantage at the moment because of the right’s disarray across the region.

Peru: Left vs. Far-Right – Dramatic Choice in Presidential Election

Peru: Left vs. Far-Right – Dramatic Choice in Presidential Election

Pedro Castillo, a leftist, unexpectedly won first place in Peru’s first-round presidential election last Sunday. However, he now faces far-right second-place finisher, Keiko Fujimori. The outcome was largely due to a completely delegitimized political class in Peru, says Peru analyst Francesca Emanuele.

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