Latin America

Does Nicaragua Under President Ortega Deserve Progressives’ Support?

Does Nicaragua Under President Ortega Deserve Progressives’ Support?

UC Santa Barbara Sociology professor William I. Robinson and the Nicaragua-based writer John Perry debate whether Nicaragua under President Ortega con be considered a leftist government, whether US intervention is a factor in that country, and whether the recent presidential election was legitimate.

Burying Neoliberalism in Chile

Burying Neoliberalism in Chile

Gabriel Boric was elected president of Chile on December 20th – probably the most leftist president Chile has elected since Salvador Allende in 1970. Boric promised that while Chile was neoliberalism’s birthplace under Dictator Pinochet, it will now be neoliberalism’s burial place as well. Patricio Zamorano, a Chilean political analyst and director of the Council on Hemispheric Affairs (COHA.org) talks about what we can expect from a Boric presidency.

Honduras: The End of the Nightmare?

Honduras: The End of the Nightmare?

The election of the leftist Xiomara Castro as Honduras’s first female president means a significant rupture with the country’s recent right-wing – even fascist – past, says Center for the Americas director Laura Carlsen. However, whether Castro will be allowed to actually govern is another question, given that the state is deeply embedded in corruption and drug trafficking.

Will Cuban Reforms Create More Inequality  –  James Early on Reality Asserts Itself Pt 3/3
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Will Cuban Reforms Create More Inequality – James Early on Reality Asserts Itself Pt 3/3

On Reality Asserts Itself with Paul Jay, James Early who has visited Cuba more than thirty times says what’s needed is more citizen participation and less centralization but Cuba is not headed towards the Chinese capitalist model. This is an episode of Reality Asserts Itself, produced November 18, 2013.

Haitian Ruling Families Create and Kill Monsters
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Haitian Ruling Families Create and Kill Monsters

The Haitian oligarchy collude with the U.S., Canada, foreign corporations and organized crime to exploit the labor and resources of the country. These families pick “black faces” to front dictatorships that do their bidding, and kill them when they are no longer useful. Jafrikayiti joins Paul Jay on theAnalysis.news

A Second Pink Tide in Latin America? – Pt 2/2

A Second Pink Tide in Latin America? – Pt 2/2

With the left’s recent electoral successes in Peru and Bolivia, and previously in Mexico and Argentina, does this mean that there is a second so-called “Pink Tide” in Latin America? If so, how do we make sense of the first Pink Tide, its successes and failures, and what might Latin America’s left have learned from the first tide, as it gets ready to take power in several countries? René Rojas, professor at SUNY Binghamton, and Hilary Goodfriend, of Jacobin Magazine Latin America, argue that while the left needs a clearer economic plan, it is at an advantage at the moment because of the right’s disarray across the region.

US Institutions Encourage Coup Impunity in Bolivia
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US Institutions Encourage Coup Impunity in Bolivia

As Bolivia’s new government under Luis Arce prepares to prosecute the people behind the 2019 coup against Evo Morales, prominent US institutions such as Human Rights Watch, Washington Post, and the State Department urge Arce not to move against them. Ollie Vargas, a journalist and analyst based in Bolivia, says the prosecution is essential at a time when coups are back in vogue in Latin America.

A Second Pink Tide in Latin America? – Pt 1/2
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A Second Pink Tide in Latin America? – Pt 1/2

With the left’s recent electoral successes in Peru and Bolivia, and previously in Mexico and Argentina, does this mean that there is a second so-called “Pink Tide” in Latin America? If so, how do we make sense of the first Pink Tide, its successes and failures, and what might Latin America’s left have learned from the first tide, as it gets ready to take power in several countries? René Rojas, professor at SUNY Binghamton, and Hilary Goodfriend, of Jacobin Magazine Latin America, argue that while the left needs a clearer economic plan, it is at an advantage at the moment because of the right’s disarray across the region.

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