How to Fight Inflation Without Attacking Workers - Pollin


Economist Bob Pollin says government stimulus and higher wages are not the primary drivers of today’s inflation. Higher interest rates are not the solution. Bob joins Paul Jay on theAnalysis.news.


Paul Jay

Hi, I’m Paul Jay. Welcome to theAnalysis.news. In a few seconds, I’ll be back with Bob Pollin. We’re going to talk about what real solutions to inflation look like.

Please don’t forget there’s a donate button at the top of our webpage. We’re getting near the end of the year, and I know people are thinking about donating, and we are a 501(c)(3) in the U.S. We’re not in Canada and other places, but certainly, we would appreciate your donations if you go to the website and click donate. If you’re on YouTube, hit subscribe. Most importantly, get on our email list. Be back in just a few seconds.

So in previous conversations with Bob Pollin, we’ve discussed inflation. The real forces driving inflation are primarily, not exclusively, but primarily high energy costs and global supply chain issues, partly caused by the pandemic and, to some extent, caused by rivalry with China. There are ongoing issues with semiconductor production. But raising interest rates has nothing to do with any of that. Raising interest rates does not lower energy prices, and it doesn’t deal with the global supply chain.

All it does is two things. It helps create more unemployment, which pressures workers to lower wage demands and perhaps be a little more reluctant to organize into unions or be more militant when they’re in unions. It’s really an attack on workers.

So in this session, we’re going to talk– okay, let’s put all that aside for a moment. Then, what should be done if the objective is actually lowering inflation and not undermining the leverage of the working class? So now joining us is Bob Pollin. Bob is the co-director of the PERI Institute in Amherst, Massachusetts. Thanks for joining us, Bob.

Robert Pollin

Thanks very much for having me on, Paul.

Paul Jay

Alright, so here’s the question I’ve asked before, but here we go. President Biden, in a strange delusional moment, because that’s what it would take, picks up the phone and calls Bob Pollin. He says, “Okay, I heard you. I actually do want to do something about inflation because otherwise, the Democrats have no chance of getting elected in ’24. Everybody’s predicting a deep recession, so what are we supposed to do? Because even me, President Biden, gets if we keep these interest rates so high, we’re going to guarantee a deep recession, and that ain’t going to be good for us Democrats. So what do you say, Bob?”

Robert Pollin

First of all, just let me summarize again what you just said. The main drivers of inflation now are the supply chain breakdowns that occurred during COVID, and those are getting repaired. I’ll come back to that. The high energy prices have actually come down a bit. The third factor is increased profits and markups of corporations who are taking advantage, especially of the supply chain shortages, by marking up their profits and marking up their prices, seeing their profits increase.

Workers’ wages have gone up over the past year by an average of about 5%. But if inflation is, let’s say, 8% or right now a little less than 8%, that means workers’ wages are falling behind inflation. So that means if inflation is 8% and workers’ wages go up 5%, that means workers are 3% worse off than they were. Workers’ wages are not the driver of inflation. The drivers of inflation are supply chain issues, energy prices, and increased markups.

So what do we do about it? Well, actually, I mean, the Biden administration, at least in its rhetoric, has gestured towards all three of those issues. They have proposed much stricter enforcement of anti-trust legislation that’s already on the books. In other words, preventing big corporations from marking up their prices. They haven’t done anything about it, but they have proposed that. Through the infrastructure bill and investments, they have proposed loosening up the supply chains and increasing the capacity of the U.S. infrastructure. That’s been slow-moving, but there. They have proposed an excess profit tax for oil companies. So put those three things together, that’s a reasonably good anti-inflation program.

Now, that’s not what the Fed is doing, as you said, Paul. The Fed is about raising interest rates to lower the level of overall activity. That is, to make it more difficult to borrow money, which is going to reduce expenditure by businesses, and then they’re going to lay off workers. Their plan is to lay off workers, reduce worker bargaining power, and get those wage demands down. But the other thing, if we were to say, “let’s go after monopoly pricing power, let’s go after the oil price markups, let’s weaken the weak links, let’s strengthen the weak links in the supply chain,” that would lower inflation. It may not do it to the same degree. You don’t get as much downward impact on inflation, but it does so without attacking the working class.

Paul Jay

So the reality is the Republicans control the House. I don’t know the real limits of executive orders, but if assuming he can create, call, declare a national emergency of some kind and do some of these things by executive order– let’s start with number one. What does that anti-trust, anti-monopoly pricing power look like? Two, that principle of excess oil profits, why not apply that across the board to all excess profits? For example, I know where I’m living, the groceries chains are making way more profit than pre-pandemic. It looks like all along, the food supply chain margins are up. Why not just tax away all that excess profit and make it pointless to do while combining that with anti-trust?

Robert Pollin

Well, yes. Anti-trust is already on the books, so it’s really a matter of enforcement. It doesn’t entail new legislation, whereas an excess profit tax would require new legislation, and of course, it would never pass the Republican-controlled House. There are other tools.

For example, one of the things that are worsening inflation is the speculation on the commodities futures market. So speculation on future prices of food and future prices of oil is pushing up the current present-day prices in the market. Again, already on the books; regulating the commodities futures market to dampen speculative pressure.

Let me make one other point before we move on. Inflation is already coming down, Paul. So if we just looked at the evidence for the last three months, inflation is– last month, it was 5% annualized. The previous two months before that, inflation was zero. That’s largely because of the energy prices. But also, the supply chain issues are taking care of themselves to some extent. I mean, one of the big things six months ago that was a big driver of inflation was, of all things, used car prices. Used car prices were way up because of the shortage of computer chips that go into new cars. So with a shortage of new cars, the demand for used cars increased, but used car prices are down to zero. So some of this stuff is transitory.

Paul Jay

Hold on. When you say used car prices are down to zero, you mean the inflation part.

Robert Pollin

The price increases maybe not be exactly zero, but they were very high, and now they’re, let’s say, negligible; the price increases.

Also, another thing that I want to mention is something that I’ve just been doing a little work on. If we look at the relationship between inflation rates and growth rates, the growth of the economy, there’s no evidence whatsoever that economies do better or rich economies do better, or any economies do better when you push inflation down in the range that the Fed wants to push it, that is the 2%. That’s the target of 2%. If you run an economy at, let’s say, 2% inflation, you are actually, on average, doing worse in terms of economic growth than if you run the economy at, say, 4% inflation. So the task of getting inflation down should not be to get it down necessarily to 2%, but rather, okay, we can shave off a couple of percentage points and get it down to 4%. That makes a big difference. And the tools that Biden has in terms of anti-trust, in terms of stopping speculation, in terms of loosening the supply chains, that can get us down, given the fact that inflation is already actually coming down.

Paul Jay

So why aren’t they? Basically, you’re saying that within the context of existing legislation, they could have over the last even two years, when in fact, they controlled both houses, but even now, they actually could have done far more. They don’t seem to be– they seem to talk a bit about it, but they don’t really do it.

Robert Pollin

Well, I think it’s a combination of things. Let’s say over the past 30 years, this idea has emerged and gotten enshrined that inflation in the U.S. and in all the high-income countries and, in fact, the middle-income countries, inflation needs to be at a minimal level, let’s say 2%. You organize economic activity and economic policy with the goal of hitting a 2% inflation target. In some countries, maybe it’s 2.5% or 3%, but that’s the range. Secondly, the way you do that is through the Federal Reserve or the equivalent central banks raising interest rates to slow down any inflationary pressures. That is a way through which, again, we attack the working class, we reduce the wage demands of workers. That’s been the policy framework, the hegemonic, the dominant policy framework that is central to neoliberalism, and it’s been there.

Now, to get out of there is a big pull. I mean, among other things, not just right-wing Republican economists, but some of the most prestigious Democratic Party economists, like Larry Summers, former Treasury Secretary and Harvard professor; they have been insistent that the only way to control inflation is effectively attacking the working class. So Biden has a big job to try to overcome all that. There are people within the administration that have been making these other arguments. They haven’t prevailed.

Paul Jay

Now, Summer’s argument was that government spending and stimulus packages were going to be a driver of inflation. I’ve played this clip a couple of times in some other interviews, but I’ll play it again because I think it’s so overtly stated. Chris Christie was on the Stephanopoulos show, and he said, “I’m going to rely on Larry Summers.” He said, “government spending is going to create massive inflation.”

Chris Christie

Larry Summers, Clinton’s Treasury Secretary, told the Biden administration two years ago, you go ahead with the spending you’re talking about, and you are going to create enormous inflation.

Paul Jay

Now there’s a report from the San Francisco Federal Reserve that actually said quite specifically that the stimulus spending might have contributed 3%, a maximum of 3%, to inflation. This is inflation that reached eight. But if it hadn’t been for the stimulus spending, there would have been a deeper recession, which would have been, in their words, “far more difficult to manage.” I would guess the effects of the stimulus spending that directly put money into people’s pockets and increased demand to some extent that’s more or less over anyway because nobody is getting it. That money’s done. When you look at how the Democrats defended their economic policy in the last election campaign, they never defended that. They kind of conceded the argument that government spending causes inflation. So everybody’s kind of back into this austerity language again.

Robert Pollin

So let’s just say everything you said is accurate. Government spending did contribute to inflation. I agree with that. It’s not the sole cause. It did contribute, but it contributed positively because, in the absence of the massive government stimulus programs, we would have had deflation and depression, which would have been far, far worse. So if we had no government stimulus program– I mean, when COVID hit in March, with the lockdowns in March 2020, unemployment went from 3.5% to 14.5% within a month, and we would have stayed there, and that would have been a great depression. We would have seen the collapse of the financial system, we would have seen mass unemployment, and people’s livelihoods destroyed. So we should be applauding.

There were problems with the stimulus program. I would have designed it differently. But on balance, it was a savior. It was a great contribution to human well-being relative to what would have happened in its absence. So yes, it did contribute to inflation, but it created a floor, and then from that floor of economic activity, then you had businesses marking up prices, so monopolistic pricing, you had the oil companies marking up prices, and you did have the supply chain shortages. Yes, we wouldn’t have had any supply chain shortages if we would have had a great depression. So the supply chain change shortages we should also see as an outgrowth of basically an effective policy to overcome this global pandemic lockdown.

Paul Jay

Well, when listening to the pundits on Wall Street, most of them are saying we’re heading back into a deep recession and probably within two years, right in time for the 2024 elections. Yet the Fed is still raising interest rates.

Robert Pollin

So I read the chatter from the business press. A lot of people on Wall Street are now saying it’s time to slow down these interest rate increases to back off. There is a little bit of noise coming out of some of the Fed governors that, well, maybe we’ve gone far enough. That could become persuasive over the next month or two. Especially, given again, if we just said, “let’s look at inflation over the last three months or four months, not year to year. Let’s look at what’s happened most recently within the year, not a full twelve months.” Well, basically, inflation is way, way down. The problem is at least–

Paul Jay

Hang on, when you say inflation is way, way down, people are going to say, “what the hell is he talking about?” Because when I go to the grocery store, everything is way, way up.

Robert Pollin

Well, if we believe government statistics, and I think they’re pretty good on inflation, yes, some food prices are still rising. They rose last month. But energy prices haven’t come down. You go to a gas station and buy gasoline, and it’s $3.30 a gallon. Four months ago, it was $5 a gallon. So that is a huge decline in energy prices. We’re not all the way down to where we were pre-COVID, which was $2.20, but that’s the direction in which it’s heading.

Paul Jay

So the financial elite, which more or less dictate Biden’s economic policy and mostly Republican economic policy when they’re in power anyway, although sometimes there are wild cards. They’re playing a sort of a game, and maybe that’s not quite the right word. How far do they allow the high-interest rates to create more unemployment and diminish consumer demand? Because so much of American purchasing is done on credit cards. So the higher the interest rates, the less people can buy on their credit cards. Versus, how concerned are they that this is going to drive what’s already looking like a recessionary period deeper? And then there are the political considerations of the Democratic Party.

Robert Pollin

So first of all, on your point on interest rates, you’ve made a very good point that I haven’t emphasized yet. Raising the interest rate, in and of itself, contributes to inflation in the first instance. Why? Because you’re making it more expensive to borrow money. So first of all, if people are borrowing money, less businesses are borrowing money, and they’re going to want to pass on those costs just like they pass on their workers, their labor costs, and that, in turn, contributes to inflation.

Now the theory is, okay, that effect is going to be temporary, and sooner or later, businesses are just not going to borrow, which means they’re going to have less money, which means they’re going to reduce their activity and lay off workers. That’s the basic theory.

Now Wall Street, if I’m reading the Wall Street news coming out of there, I think they are conflicted because they don’t want a recession. They don’t want the value of their assets to collapse. On the other hand, yes, yes, they do. They would love to see workers stop getting wage increases, and even though the wage increases are below the inflation rate so that the average living standard is being cut, any wage increases, it has not happened basically for almost 50 years in the United States.

The average worker’s wage today is basically what it was 50 years ago in 1972, even though productivity, the amount a worker produces in a day, has gone up two and a half fold. So if the average worker is making $25 an hour today and was making $25 an hour in 1972, if the average worker had gotten raises commensurate with productivity, they’d be making over $60. The average worker would make over $60 an hour today. What that demonstrates is the massive rise in inequality that has occurred under neoliberalism, and keeping workers’ wage demands down has been central to that project. Wall Street wants that project to continue. They just don’t want there to be a recession.

Paul Jay

Well, it’s not all under their control, and there are many conflicting interests here, not the least of which is the fossil fuel companies who will fight to the death not to have an excess profit tax. All of them are going to fight to the death not to have stronger anti-trust legislation. The whole system is incredibly chaotic and conflicted. Let’s put this all in the context of the real crisis here, which is the climate crisis. You can’t look at anything in terms of economic policy, frankly, any policy, but you can’t look at economic policy without looking at it in the context that we are heading into essentially a catastrophic situation, probably sooner than later.

Every time you look at the IPCC reports, the window for avoiding 1.5 degrees narrows, and everybody that really follows this thing, that we’re not going to hit– we’re going to go past 1.5, we’re on our way to 2. So you put that into the context that there needs to be some kind of more assertive policy. Use the words if you want because it’s essentially a type of central planning in some form or another, which we already have. I mean, I think you’ve made the point before. The Pentagon is a form of central planning. So it’s not like these guys don’t use central planning. They just use central planning to make rich people richer.

I know it’s a little ‘pie in the sky’, but at any rate, if you had progressive or control of both Houses and you had a president, what do they got to be doing now? Both on this sort of side of the rights of workers, the issue of inflation in the context of a climate policy that’s actually going to be effective. So I just asked you to rule the world.

Robert Pollin

Well, thank you for that appointment. I don’t know if I’m up to the task. My candidate for ruling the world would be my co-author Noam Chomsky, and maybe I could be one of his minor assistants. But sure–

Paul Jay

Take a stab.

Robert Pollin

I’ll take a stab at it. By the way, I have suggested that to Noam. He hasn’t taken me up on it. I think he realizes that it’s not within my powers to appoint him. If we’re going to put the climate crisis on top of everything else, which is where it belongs, number one, the high oil prices for fossil fuel companies, we should see that as a positive, ironically. The bad news with respect to the high fossil fuel prices is it’s attacking people’s living standards.

So what’s the solution there? Well, we can start with the excess profit tax on fossil fuel companies, so they’re not making any extra money, and then we return the revenue from that tax to people so that they are not hurt by the high fossil fuel prices. Rather it creates an incentive for people to look to either raise energy efficiency or buy cheaper energy meaning renewable energy. So promoting the renewable energy sector and raising energy efficiency standards which, in turn, as you and I have talked about now for over a decade a good engine of job creation. So it expands job opportunities, and it gets us off of fossil fuels. So that would be my starter in terms of that.

By the way, if we’re thinking about saying, “well, with respect to the climate crisis, fossil fuel companies shouldn’t be making excess profits.” Well, actually, follow the logic, they shouldn’t be making any profits. They’re making profits off of destroying the world. So logically, we should nationalize the fossil fuel companies and take away the power they have, including the power that we just observed over the past two weeks to run [inaudible 00:26:10] and destroy any hope of something positive happening in these COP meetings. In the last COP 27 meeting, the fossil fuel companies actually were able to prevent any mention whatsoever of cutting back on fossil fuel consumption.

Paul Jay

Now there’s been some serious conversations, I think, and there are some jurisdictions, there’s even some legislation to phase out the combustion engine and just pick a date and say no more cars, no more vehicles. After such and such date, there will be no more combustion engines. Where are we at on that? And is that a good proposal?

Robert Pollin

I think it’s a great proposal. I think proposals that impose hard regulations are really the best way to make progress here. It’s clear we’re not going to make progress at the level of these international meetings because every country has veto power, so of course, the fossil fuel-dependent economies are going to veto anything. So what really has to happen is on the side of demand. What we can impose at the level of states, at the levels of some countries, at the level of municipalities, at the level of big institutions like my own university, as an example, is just saying, “we’re not going to consume. We’re going to go 100% electric with renewable energy.” Then it doesn’t matter what the fossil fuel companies do or say because we don’t want their product. So yeah, a state can set regulations and say, “the utility companies in our state have to be run 100% on renewable energy by 2035,” and then that’s it. Then there’s no more buying coal, no more buying natural gas, and all the vehicles are going to be electric vehicles. You can’t run a gas station with fossil fuels anymore, with gasoline.

That’s the way through which I think we can make progress. If that breaks through, it doesn’t have to break through in every state. It can break through in some states. It can break through in New York. It can break through in California. It can break through in Illinois. Once it does that, then the handwriting is on the wall. Then, you know, the producers of renewables see their market expanding. The fossil fuel companies, the shareholders say this is a losing proposition. So that’s the way I think that we need to focus in terms of getting out of the current total morass in terms of these global negotiations.

Paul Jay

I don’t think the auto manufacturers would even mind it all that much. They know it’s coming, and as long as it’s applied to all of them, not one has a competitive advantage over the other. If they all had to get off the combustion engine, they probably wouldn’t push back all that much. They’ll just compete and fight for market share based on–

Robert Pollin

 It’s happening anyway. I just did a study a few months ago for South Korea, and they are a major auto manufacturer, but they’re saying they are going to totally phase out combustion engine vehicles by 2035. They’re planning it.

Paul Jay

And hasn’t Europe, hasn’t the EU passed some law based on that?

Robert Pollin

Yes, they have, and so has California. Once you start to get momentum around that, then right, it doesn’t matter. You own stock in a fossil fuel company; that’s stupid because fossil fuels aren’t going to be used for powering cars and for powering utility companies. So, you know, move on. There are opportunities in building a green economy.

Paul Jay

So, people that are organizing on these issues or want to and are thinking about how they’re going to vote, certainly at least at the state level and in some of the big states where there’s a lot of progressive public opinion, there could be a real focus on this. Let me ask, is by 2035 soon enough?

Robert Pollin

Well, probably not. Given where we are, every year that we don’t make progress on cutting emissions, that means the next year, we have to come up with even bigger cuts. So 2035 might have been, I mean, just reading stuff from the IPCC, getting down to 50% emission reduction by 2030 and getting to zero by 2050; that was what they laid out. We may have to be more aggressive every year that we don’t make enough progress. Let’s say 2035 is the year in which we ban the use of internal combustion engine cars, and we ban the use of fossil fuel-powered utilities for electricity; that’s certainly a lot better than what’s on the table right now. Do I know if it’s adequate relative to the magnitude of the climate crisis? No, because I’m not a climate scientist.

Paul Jay

The Biden administration, can they do any of this through executive order, or does it all has to be done at the state level?

Robert Pollin

Well, they can do– the anti-trust stuff is on–

Paul Jay

Can they ban the combustion engine under any existing legislation and or executive order?

Robert Pollin

I don’t know, Paul. But I know that they can do it for government purchases. The government can, which is big, big government, including the military, can say that we’re going to go all-electric vehicles, all-electric heat pumps, no more fossil fuel utility purchases. They can do all of that, and so can state governments. UMass, Amherst, my institution, has said that we’re going 100% zero emissions by 2032. Let’s say every large university made the same commitment; that would be very impactful.

Paul Jay

Well, Biden is the commander-in-chief. He could simply order the military to get off fossil fuel. I mean, he could do lots of things, but that would mean he wasn’t the Biden we know.

Robert Pollin

It’s much safer to have their own supply chain for whatever nefarious imperialistic project. It’s much safer to have a supply chain based on renewable energy and solar panels, as opposed to having to cart in fossil fuels constantly to maintain their operations.

Paul Jay

Already the Navy has modeled how many of their naval ports around the world are going to be disappearing with the rise in sea levels. They talk about it, but I don’t know what they’re doing about it.

Alright, well, we’re going to do another segment on COP 27, and we’re going to dig into this. Ellsberg has this term he uses when he’s talking about nuclear war and nuclear weapons policy in the United States. He calls it “institutional madness.” Well, you can apply the same thing to climate. We’ve just seen it at COP 27. So look out for the next segment. This was Bob Pollin on theAnalysis. Thanks for joining me, Bob.

Robert Pollin

Thank you, Paul. Good to be on.

Paul Jay

Thanks again. Bye.

Paul Jay 

Hola, soy Paul Jay. Bienvenido a theAnalysis.news. 

En unos segundos estaré con Bob Pollin. Vamos a hablar sobre las soluciones reales a la inflación. 

No olvide que hay un botón de Donar en la parte superior de nuestro sitio web. Nos acercamos a fin de año y sé que la gente está pensando en donar. Somos un 501 C3 en Estados Unidos. No lo somos en Canadá ni en otros lugares, pero sin duda agradeceríamos su donación si va al sitio web y hace clic en Donar. Si está en YouTube, haga clic en Suscribirse. Lo más importante, registre su correo electrónico.

Volvemos en unos segundos. 

Entonces, en conversaciones anteriores con Bob Pollin hablamos de la inflación, que las fuerzas reales que impulsan la inflación son principalmente, no exclusivamente, pero principalmente, altos costos de la energía, problemas en la cadena de suministro global, causados ​​en parte por la pandemia y en cierta medida causados por la rivalidad con China, y problemas continuados sobre la producción de semiconductores. 

Pero subir las tasas de interés no tiene nada que ver con nada de eso. Subir los tipos de interés no baja los precios de la energía y no arregla la cadena de suministro global. Todo lo que hace son dos cosas: ayuda a crear más desempleo, lo que presiona a los trabajadores para que reduzcan las demandas salariales y quizá sean un poco más reacios a formar sindicatos o ser más participativos cuando están en sindicatos. Es realmente un ataque a los trabajadores. 

Así que en esta sesión vamos a hablar… Bien, dejemos todo eso a un lado por un momento. ¿Qué se debe hacer si el objetivo es realmente bajar la inflación y no socavar el poder de la clase trabajadora? 

Ahora nos acompaña Bob Pollin. Robert Pollin es codirector del Instituto Perry, en Amherst, Massachusetts. Gracias por acompañarnos, Bob. 

Robert Pollin 

Muchas gracias por invitarme, Paul. 

Paul Jay 

Muy bien, esta es la pregunta que hice antes, pero allá vamos. El presidente Biden, en un momento extraño y delirante, porque tendría que estarlo para hacer esto, coge el teléfono, llama a Robert Pollin y dice: “Está bien, lo he oído. Quiero hacer algo con respecto a la inflación, porque de lo contrario los demócratas no tienen posibilidades de ser elegidos en 2024. Todo el mundo predice una profunda recesión, entonces, ¿qué se supone que debemos hacer? Porque incluso yo, el presidente Biden, entiendo que si mantenemos estas tasas de interés tan altas, vamos a garantizar una profunda recesión y eso no va a ser bueno para nosotros los demócratas”. 

Entonces, ¿qué dices, Bob? 

Robert Pollin 

En primer lugar, déjame resumir de nuevo lo que acabas de decir. 

Los principales impulsores de la inflación ahora son: las fallas en la cadena de suministro que ocurrieron en la pandemia, y se están remediando, y volveré a eso; los altos precios de la energía, que han bajado un poco, y el tercer factor es el aumento de las ganancias, los márgenes comerciales, de las corporaciones, que se están aprovechando, especialmente de la escasez de productos en la cadena de suministro al aumentar sus precios, lo que hace aumentar sus ganancias. 

Entonces, los salarios de los trabajadores han aumentado durante el último año en un promedio de alrededor del 5 %. Pero si la inflación es, digamos, del 8 %, o ahora mismo un poco menos del 8 %, eso significa que los salarios de los trabajadores están cayendo por debajo de la inflación. Entonces, si la inflación es del 8 % y los salarios de los trabajadores suben un 5 %, eso significa que los trabajadores tienen poder adquisitivo un 3 % más bajo que antes. 

Entonces, los salarios de los trabajadores no son la causa de la inflación. Las causas de la inflación son los problemas de la cadena de suministro, los precios de la energía y el aumento de los márgenes. 

Entonces, ¿qué hacemos al respecto? Bueno, en realidad, la administración Biden, al menos en su retórica, ha dado pasos iniciales en estos tres temas. Han propuesto una aplicación mucho más estricta de la legislación antimonopolio, que ya es ley. En otras palabras, impedir que las grandes corporaciones suban sus precios. No han hecho nada al respecto, pero lo han propuesto. 

Mediante el proyecto de ley de infraestructura e inversiones, han propuesto liberar las cadenas de suministro, aumentar la capacidad de la infraestructura estadounidense. Ha sido un movimiento lento, pero ahí… Y han propuesto un impuesto a las ganancias excesivas para las empresas petroleras. 

Entonces, juntando esas tres cosas, es un programa antiinflacionario razonablemente bueno. Ahora, eso no es lo que está haciendo la Fed. Como has dicho, Paul. Lo que hace la Fed es aumentar las tasas de interés para reducir el nivel de actividad general. Es decir, para que sea más difícil obtener créditos, lo que va a reducir el gasto de las empresas y luego van a despedir trabajadores. Y ese es… Su plan es despedir trabajadores, reducir el poder de negociación de los trabajadores y bajar esas demandas salariales. 

Pero las otras cosas, si decidiéramos combatir la fijación de precios por parte de los monopolios, el aumento de los márgenes del precio del petróleo, y fortalecer los eslabones débiles de la cadena de suministro, eso bajará la inflación. Puede que no lo haga en el mismo grado. No conseguirás bajar tanto la inflación, pero sí bajará sin atacar a la clase obrera. 

Paul Jay 

La realidad es que los republicanos controlan la Cámara. No conozco los límites reales de las órdenes ejecutivas, pero suponiendo que pueda crear, invocar, declarar, una emergencia nacional de algún tipo y hacer algunas de estas cosas por orden ejecutiva… Comencemos con: número uno, cómo es ese poder de fijación de precios antimonopolio; y dos, ese principio de exceso de ganancias petroleras, ¿por qué no aplicar eso de forma generalizada a todos los excesos de beneficios? Por ejemplo, donde vivo, las cadenas de supermercados están obteniendo ganancias mucho más altas que antes de la pandemia. Parece que en toda la cadena de suministro de alimentos los márgenes han aumentado. Por qué no gravar todo ese exceso de ganancias y hacer que no tenga sentido hacerlo, combinándolo con antimonopolio. 

Robert Pollin 

Bueno, sí. Ya existen leyes antimonopolio, por lo que es realmente una cuestión de cumplimiento. No se requiere nueva legislación. Mientras que un impuesto sobre los beneficios excesivos requeriría una nueva legislación y, por supuesto, nunca pasaría la Cámara controlada por los republicanos. 

Hay otras herramientas. Por ejemplo, una de las cosas que está empeorando la inflación es la especulación en el mercado de futuros de materias primas. La especulación sobre los precios futuros de los alimentos y los precios futuros del petróleo están aumentando, los precios actuales en el mercado. De nuevo, ya existe legislación. Regular el mercado de futuros de materias primas para amortiguar la presión especulativa. 

Pero permíteme dar otro argumento antes de continuar. La inflación ya está bajando, Paul. Entonces, si solo miramos la evidencia de los últimos tres meses, la inflación es… El mes pasado fue del 5 % anualizado. Los dos meses anteriores a eso, la inflación era cero. Eso se debe en gran medida a los precios de la energía. Pero también los problemas de la cadena de suministro se están solucionando hasta cierto punto. Quiero decir, un factor importante hace seis meses que fue un gran impulsor de la inflación fue, extrañamente, el precio de los coches usados. Y los precios de los coches usados ​​estaban muy altos debido a la escasez de chips de ordenador que se usan en los coches nuevos. Entonces, con la escasez de coches nuevos, la demanda de coches usados ​​aumenta, pero los precios de estos han bajado a cero. Algunas de estas cosas son transitorias. 

Paul Jay 

Espera. Cuando dices que ​​han bajado a cero, te refieres a la parte de la inflación. 

Robert Pollin 

Los aumentos de precio quizá no sean exactamente cero, pero estaban muy altos, y ahora, digamos, el aumento de precios es negligible. 

También otra cosa que quiero mencionar, algo en lo que he estado trabajando un poco… Si observamos la relación entre las tasas de inflación y las tasas de crecimiento, el crecimiento de la economía, no hay evidencia alguna de que las economías funcionen mejor, o las economías ricas funcionen mejor o cualquier economía funcione mejor, cuando bajas la inflación al rango en el que la Fed quiere bajarla, el 2 %, ese es el objetivo, el 2 %. 

Si tienes una economía con, digamos, una inflación del 2 %, en realidad, en promedio, tendrás un crecimiento económico menor que si tienes la economía a, digamos, el 4-5 % de inflación. Así que la tarea de bajar la inflación no debería ser bajarla necesariamente al 2 %, sino más bien, podemos quitar un par de puntos porcentuales y reducirla al 4 %. Eso supone una gran diferencia. 

Y las herramientas que tiene Biden en términos antimonopolio, en términos de detener la especulación, en términos de liberar las cadenas de suministro, eso puede reducirla, puesto que la inflación ya está bajando. 

Paul Jay 

Entonces, ¿por qué no lo hacen? Básicamente, estás diciendo que en el contexto de la legislación existente, durante los últimos dos años, cuando controlaban ambas cámaras, pero incluso ahora, podrían haber hecho mucho más. Y no parecen estarlo haciendo, hablan un poco al respecto, pero en realidad no lo hacen. 

Robert Pollin 

Creo que es una combinación de cosas. Digamos… en los últimos 30 años ha surgido y se ha consagrado esta idea de que la inflación en EE. UU. y en todos los países de ingresos altos y, de hecho, en los países de ingresos medios, la inflación debe estar en un nivel mínimo, digamos el 2 %, y organizas la actividad económica, la política económica, con el objetivo de alcanzar una meta de inflación del 2 %. En algunos países quizá sea el 2,5 % o el 3 %, pero ese es el rango. Y en segundo lugar, la forma de hacerlo es que la Reserva Federal o los bancos centrales equivalentes suban las tasas de interés para frenar cualquier presión inflacionaria. 

Y ese es un camino por el cual, de nuevo, atacamos a la clase obrera, reducimos las demandas salariales de los trabajadores. Ese ha sido el marco político hegemónico, el marco político dominante fundamental para el neoliberalismo, y ha estado ahí. 

Ahora, salir de este gran agujero no es fácil. Quiero decir, entre otras cosas, no solo los economistas republicanos de derecha, algunos de los economistas más prestigiosos del Partido Demócrata, como Larry Summers, exsecretario del Tesoro, profesor de Harvard, han recalcado que la única forma de controlar la inflación es atacar efectivamente a la clase trabajadora. 

Entonces, Biden tendrá que trabajar mucho para tratar de superar todo eso. Hay gente dentro de su administración que ha presentado otros argumentos. No han tenido éxito. 

Paul Jay 

El argumento de Summers era que el gasto público, los paquetes de estímulo, iba a ser un impulsor de la inflación. Y he reproducido este clip un par de veces en otras entrevistas, pero lo haré de nuevo porque creo que lo dicen abiertamente. 

Chris Christie estuvo en el programa de Stephanopoulos y dice: “Voy a confiar en Larry Summers”. “El gasto del Gobierno va a generar una inflación masiva”. 

Larry Summers, secretario del Tesoro de Clinton, le dijo a la administración de Biden hace dos años: “Si implementan el gasto del que está hablando, van a crear una inflación enorme”. 

Paul Jay 

Ahora hay un informe de la Reserva Federal de San Francisco que en realidad decía muy específicamente que el gasto de estímulo podría haber contribuido 3 %, máximo 3 %, a la inflación. La inflación que llegó a ocho. Pero si no hubiera sido por el gasto de estímulo, habría habido una recesión más profunda, que habría sido, según sus palabras, mucho más difícil de manejar. Y supongo que los efectos del gasto de estímulo, que puso dinero directamente en los bolsillos de las personas y aumentó la demanda hasta cierto punto, eso más o menos ha terminado de todos modos porque ese dinero ha desaparecido. 

Pero cuando miras cómo los demócratas defendieron su política económica en la última campaña electoral, nunca defendieron eso. De alguna manera aceptaron el argumento de que el gasto público causa inflación. Así que todo el mundo ha vuelto a este lenguaje de austeridad de nuevo. 

Robert Pollin 

Entonces, digamos… Todo lo que has dicho es exacto. El gasto público contribuyó a la inflación. Estoy de acuerdo con eso. No es la única causa, sí contribuyó, pero contribuyó positivamente porque en ausencia de los programas gubernamentales de estímulo a gran escala, habríamos tenido deflación y depresión, lo que habría sido mucho mucho peor. 

Entonces, si no hubiéramos tenido un programa de estímulo del Gobierno… Quiero decir, cuando empezaron los confinamientos por el covid en marzo de 2020, el desempleo pasó del 3,5 % al 14,5 % en un mes, y nos hubiéramos quedado ahí y eso habría sido una gran depresión. Habríamos visto el colapso del sistema financiero, habríamos visto un desempleo generalizado, los medios de subsistencia de las personas destruidos… 

Así que deberíamos aplaudir que… Hubo problemas con el programa de estímulo. Yo lo hubiera diseñado de otra manera. Pero en términos absolutos fue una panacea. Fue un gran aporte al bienestar humano comparado con lo que habría sucedido en su ausencia. 

Así que sí, contribuyó a la inflación, pero creó una base y luego, de esa base de actividad económica, vimos que las empresas aumentaban los precios, lo cual constituye monopolio, las compañías petroleras aumentaron los precios y vimos la escasez de productos en la cadena de suministro. Sí, no habríamos tenido escasez si hubiéramos tenido una gran depresión. Entonces, la escasez de productos en la cadena de suministro también debería verse como una consecuencia de… básicamente una política efectiva para superar este bloqueo pandémico global. 

Paul Jay 

Bueno, he escuchado a los expertos en Wall Street y la mayoría dice que estamos regresando a una profunda recesión y probablemente dentro de dos años, justo antes de las elecciones de 2024. Sin embargo, la Fed sigue aumentando las tasas de interés. 

Robert Pollin 

Leo las conversaciones de la prensa de negocios y mucha gente en Wall Street dice que es hora de frenar estos aumentos de tasas de interés, de retroceder. Y algunos de los gobernadores de la Fed están hablando de esto, que, bueno, quizás ya hemos ido lo suficientemente lejos. 

Eso podría ser persuasivo durante el próximo mes o dos. Especialmente dado, de nuevo… Si dijéramos: “Veamos la inflación de los últimos tres o cuatro meses, no de año en año, veamos lo que sucedió más recientemente este año, no doce meses completos”. Bueno, básicamente, la inflación está muy muy abajo. Entonces, el problema es, al menos para algunos… 

Paul Jay 

Espera, cuando dices que la inflación está muy muy abajo, la gente va a decir, ¿de qué está hablando? Porque cuando voy al supermercado, todo está muy muy caro. 

Robert Pollin 

Bueno, si creemos en las estadísticas del Gobierno, y creo que son bastante buenas sobre la inflación, sí, estamos viendo que los precios de algunos alimentos siguen subiendo. Subieron el mes pasado. Pero los precios de la energía… No han bajado, pero vas a una gasolinera y la gasolina cuesta 3,3 dólares el galón. Hace cuatro meses costaba 5 dólares el galón. Así que eso es una gran caída en los precios de la energía. No hemos llegado hasta donde estábamos antes del covid, que era de 2,20 dólares, pero va en esa dirección. 

Paul Jay 

La élite financiera, que más o menos dicta la política económica de Biden y sobre todo la política económica republicana cuando están en el poder de todos modos, aunque a veces hay elementos inesperados… ¿Están jugando una especie de juego? Y quizá esa no sea la palabra correcta. ¿Hasta dónde permitirán que las altas tasas de interés creen más desempleo y disminuya la demanda de los consumidores? Porque muchos estadounidenses usan tarjetas de crédito y las tasas de interés harán que compren menos. ¿Y les preocupa que esto vaya a conducir a lo que ya parece un periodo de recesión más profundo? Y luego están las consideraciones políticas del Partido Demócrata. 

Robert Pollin 

En primer lugar, en cuanto a las tasas de interés, has mencionado algo que no he enfatizado todavía. Elevar la tasa de interés, en sí mismo, contribuye a la inflación en el primer caso. ¿Por qué? Porque estás haciendo que sea más caro pedir dinero prestado. En primer lugar, si la gente pide un crédito, menos empresas piden créditos, van a querer transferir esos costos, al igual que transfieren los costos de sus trabajadores, sus costos laborales. Y eso a su vez contribuye a la inflación. 

La teoría es que ese efecto va a ser temporal y, tarde o temprano, las empresas simplemente no van a pedir préstamos, van a tener menos dinero, y van a reducir su actividad y despedir trabajadores. Esa es la teoría básica. 

Ahora bien, en Wall Street, si estoy interpretando correctamente las noticias que salen de Wall Street, creo que están en conflicto, porque no quieren una recesión. No quieren que el valor de sus activos se derrumbe. Por otro lado, sí, les encantaría ver que los trabajadores dejen de recibir aumentos salariales aunque los aumentos salariales estén por debajo de la tasa de inflación, por lo que se está recortando el nivel de vida medio, los salarios no han aumentado básicamente durante casi 50 años en los Estados Unidos. El salario promedio de los trabajadores hoy en día es básicamente lo que era hace 50 años, en 1972, aunque la productividad, lo que produce un trabajador en un día, se ha multiplicado por dos y medio. Entonces, si el trabajador promedio gana 25 dólares por hora hoy y ganaba 25 dólares la hora en 1972, si hubiese subido el salario del trabajador promedio acorde con la productividad, estarían ganando más de 60 dólares… el trabajador promedio ganaría más de 60 dólares por hora hoy. Y lo que eso demuestra es el gran aumento de la desigualdad que se ha producido bajo el neoliberalismo, y mantener bajas las demandas salariales ha sido fundamental para ese proyecto. Y Wall Street quiere que ese proyecto continúe. Simplemente no quieren que haya una recesión. 

Paul Jay 

Bueno, no todo está bajo su control y hay muchos intereses en conflicto aquí, uno de los cuales es que las compañías de combustibles fósiles lucharán a muerte contra un impuesto a las ganancias excesivas. Todos ellos van a luchar hasta la muerte contra una legislación antimonopolio más fuerte. Todo el sistema es increíblemente caótico, conflictivo. 

Y pongamos todo esto en el contexto de la crisis real aquí, que es la crisis climática. No se puede analizar nada en términos de política económica, y, francamente, cualquier política, sin verlo en el contexto de que nos dirigimos, esencialmente, a una situación catastrófica probablemente más temprano que tarde. Cada vez que miras los informes del IPCC [Panel Intergubernamental contra el Cambio Climático], la ventana para evitar los 1,5 grados se estrecha y todos los que realmente siguen esto, que no vamos a llegar… que vamos a pasar 1.5, vamos a llegar a 2. 

Así que pones eso en el contexto… de que tiene que haber algún tipo de política más asertiva… Usa las palabras si quieres porque es esencialmente un tipo de planificación central de una forma u otra, que es algo que ya tenemos. Creo que ya lo has dicho antes. El Pentágono es una forma de planificación central. No es que no usen la planificación central. Simplemente la usan para hacer más rica a la gente rica. 

Sé que es un poco utópico, pero en todo caso si los progresistas controlaban ambas cámaras, un presidente, qué deben hacer ahora, tanto en los derechos de los trabajadores, el tema de la inflación, en el contexto de una política climática, que sea realmente efectivo. Tan solo te he pedido que gobiernes el mundo. 

Robert Pollin 

Bueno, gracias por el nombramiento. No sé si estoy a la altura. Mi candidato para gobernar el mundo sería mi coautor, Noam Chomsky, y quizá yo podría ser uno de sus asistentes menores. Pero en breve… 

Paul Jay 

Inténtalo. 

Robert Pollin 

Lo intentaré. Por cierto, se lo he sugerido a Noam. No me ha hecho caso. Creo que se da cuenta de que no tengo poder para nombrarlo. 

Debemos poner la crisis climática por encima de todo lo demás, que es lo correcto. Número uno, los altos precios del petróleo para las empresas de combustibles fósiles deben verse como algo positivo, irónicamente. La mala noticia con respecto a los altos precios de los combustibles fósiles es que está atacando el nivel de vida de las personas.

Entonces, ¿cuál es la solución? Bueno, podemos comenzar con el impuesto a las ganancias excesivas de las empresas de combustibles fósiles para que no ganen dinero extra, y luego devolvemos los ingresos de ese impuesto a las personas para que no se vean afectadas por los altos precios de los combustibles fósiles. Más bien, crea un incentivo para que las personas busquen aumentar la eficiencia energética o comprar energía más barata, es decir, energía renovable. 

Por lo tanto, promover el sector de las energías renovables y elevar los estándares de eficiencia energética, lo que a su vez, como tú y yo hemos hablado durante más de una década, es un buen motor de creación de empleo. Por lo tanto, amplía las oportunidades laborales y nos aleja de los combustibles fósiles. 

Así que ese sería mi primer paso a ese respecto. 

Y por cierto, si estamos pensando que, con respecto a la crisis climática, las empresas de combustibles fósiles no deberían tener ganancias excesivas, bueno, tan solo sigue la lógica. No deberían estar obteniendo ganancias. Están obteniendo ganancias por destruir el mundo. Así que lógicamente deberíamos nacionalizar las empresas de combustibles fósiles y quitarles el poder que tienen, incluyendo el poder que acabamos de observar en las últimas dos semanas de saltarse a la torera, destruir cualquier esperanza de que suceda algo positivo en estas reuniones del COP. En la última reunión, el COP 27, las compañías de combustibles fósiles han podido impedir cualquier mención de reducir el consumo de combustibles fósiles. 

Paul Jay 

Ahora ha habido algunas conversaciones serias, creo, y hay algunas jurisdicciones, incluso hay alguna legislación, para eliminar gradualmente el motor de combustión y simplemente elegir una fecha y decir: no más coches, no más vehículos, después de tal o cual fecha no habrá más motores de combustión. ¿Dónde estamos en eso? ¿Y es una buena propuesta? 

Robert Pollin 

Creo que es una gran propuesta. Creo que cualquier propuesta que imponga regulaciones duras es realmente la mejor manera de progresar aquí. Está claro que no vamos a avanzar al nivel de estos encuentros internacionales, porque todos los países tienen poder de veto y, por supuesto, las economías dependientes de los combustibles fósiles van a vetar cualquier cosa. 

Así que realmente tiene que venir del lado de la demanda. Lo que podemos imponer a nivel de los estados, a nivel de algunos países, a nivel de municipios, a nivel de grandes instituciones, como mi propia universidad, por ejemplo, es simplemente decir que no vamos a consumir. Vamos a optar por electricidad proveniente de energía renovable. Y no importa lo que las compañías de combustibles fósiles hagan o digan porque no queremos su producto. 

Entonces, sí, un estado puede establecer una regulación y decir que las empresas de servicios públicos en nuestro estado tienen que funcionar al 100 % con energía renovable para 2035, y eso es todo. Ya no hay que comprar carbón, no más comprar gas natural, y todos los vehículos van a ser vehículos eléctricos y ya no se puede tener una gasolinera con combustibles fósiles, con gasolina. Ese es el camino por el cual creo que podemos avanzar. 

Y si eso tiene éxito… No tiene que tener éxito en todos los estados. Solo algunos estados. En Nueva York, en California, en Illinois. Y una vez que lo haga, va a ser el fin. 

Entonces, los productores de energías renovables ven su mercado en expansión. Las empresas de combustibles fósiles. Los accionistas dicen que esta es una propuesta perdedora. Así que esa es la forma en que creo que debemos enfocarnos en términos de salir del atolladero actual, en términos de estas negociaciones globales. 

Paul Jay 

No creo que a los fabricantes de automóviles les importe demasiado. Saben que viene y, mientras se aplique a todos ellos, ninguno tiene una ventaja competitiva sobre el otro. Si todos tienen que dejar el motor de combustión, probablemente no se resistan mucho. Competirán y lucharán por la cuota de mercado basándose en… 

Robert Pollin 

Ya está pasando. Acabo de hacer un estudio hace unos meses para Corea del Sur, y son un importante fabricante de automóviles, pero dicen que van a eliminar por completo los vehículos con motor de combustión para 2035. Lo están planeando. 

Paul Jay 

Y Europa, ¿no ha aprobado la UE alguna ley? 

Robert Pollin 

Sí, lo han hecho. Y California. Entonces, una vez que comienzas a tomar impulso en este tema, entonces, bien, no importa. Tienes acciones en una empresa de combustibles fósiles. Eso es estúpido porque los vehículos no van a funcionar con combustibles fósiles ni las empresas de servicios públicos. 

Entonces, adelante. Hay oportunidades en la construcción de una economía verde. 

Paul Jay 

Entonces, las personas que se están organizando sobre estos temas, o quieren hacerlo, y pensando en cómo van a votar, ciertamente al menos a nivel estatal y en algunos de los grandes estados donde la opinión pública es progresista, podría haber un enfoque real en esto. Y preguntaré, ¿es para 2035 lo suficientemente pronto? 

Robert Pollin 

Bueno, probablemente no. Dada la situación, cada año que no avanzamos en la reducción de emisiones significa que el siguiente año tendremos que hacer recortes aún mayores. Así que 2035 podría ser… solo leyendo el IPCC, llegar al 50 % de reducción de emisiones para 2030 y llegar a cero para 2050. Eso fue lo que plantearon. Es posible que tengamos que ser más agresivos cada año que no progresemos lo suficiente. Pero digamos que 2035 es el año en que prohibimos el uso de automóviles con motor de combustión interna, que prohibimos el uso de servicios públicos que funcionan con combustibles fósiles para generar electricidad. Eso es ciertamente mucho mejor que lo que está sobre la mesa en este momento. ¿Es suficiente en relación con la magnitud de la crisis climática? No lo sé porque no soy climatólogo. 

Paul Jay 

¿Puede la administración Biden hacer algo de esto mediante una orden ejecutiva o todo tiene que hacerse a nivel estatal? 

Robert Pollin 

Bueno, pueden hacerlo… El tema antimonopolio está en marcha… 

Paul Jay 

¿Pueden prohibir el motor de combustión en virtud de cualquier legislación u orden ejecutiva existente? 

Robert Pollin 

No. No lo sé, Paul. Pero sé que lo pueden hacer para compras del Gobierno. El Gobierno… 

Paul Jay 

Que es grande. 

Robert Pollin 

El gran Gobierno, incluidos los militares, puede decir que van a pasarse a los vehículos eléctricos, bombas de calor eléctricas, no más compras de servicios públicos de combustibles fósiles. Pueden hacer todo eso, al igual que los Gobiernos estatales. UMass, Amherst, mi institución, ha dicho que pasaremos a 100 % cero emisiones para 2032. Si todas las grandes universidades hicieran el mismo compromiso, eso tendría un gran impacto. 

Paul Jay 

Bueno, Biden es el comandante en jefe. Simplemente podría ordenar a los militares que abandonaran los combustibles fósiles. Podría hacer muchas cosas, pero eso significaría que no es… el Biden que conocemos… 

Robert Pollin 

Es mucho más seguro tener su propia cadena de suministro para cada nefasto proyecto imperialista. Es mucho más seguro tener una cadena de suministro basada en energía renovable, paneles solares, en lugar de tener que transportar combustibles fósiles constantemente para mantener sus operaciones. 

Paul Jay 

Y la Marina ya ha calculado cuántos de sus puertos navales en todo el mundo van a desaparecer con la subida del nivel del mar. Hablan de ello, pero no sé qué están haciendo al respecto. 

Muy bien, bueno, vamos a hacer otro segmento sobre el COP 27 y vamos a profundizar en esto… Ellsberg tiene un término que usa cuando habla de guerra nuclear y política de armas nucleares en los Estados Unidos. Él lo llama locura institucional. Bueno, puedes aplicar lo mismo al clima. Lo acabamos de ver en la COP 27. Así que vean el siguiente segmento. Bob Pollin en theAnalysis. Gracias por acompañarme. 

Robert Pollin 

Gracias, Paul. Un placer. 

Paul Jay 

Gracias de nuevo. Adiós.


Select one or choose any amount to donate whatever you like
$

Never miss another story

Subscribe to theAnalysis.news - Newsletter
Name(Required)

Robert Pollin is an American economist and self-described socialist. He is a professor of economics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and founding co-director of its Political Economy Research Institute. He has been described as a leftist economist and is a supporter of egalitarianism.”

theAnalysis.news theme music

written by Slim Williams for Paul Jay’s documentary film “Never-Endum-Referendum“.  

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *