Monopoly Power vs Democracy - Matt Stoller


Are antitrust laws effective as a mechanism to break up monopolies and Big Tech? How monopolies enable price-gouging and drive inflation. Talia Baroncelli speaks to Matt Stoller, Research Director at the American Economic Liberties Project.


Talia Baroncelli

Hi. I’m Talia Batonshelli, and this is theAnalysis.news. I’ll shortly be joined by Matt Stoller to speak about monopoly power and its impact on the political sphere. Please don’t forget to go to our website, theAnalysis.news, to donate and subscribe to our newsletter. I’ll be back in a second.

I’m joined now by Matt Stoller. He’s the research director at the American Economic Liberties Project and the author of the book Goliath: The 100-Year War Between Monopoly Power and Democracy. He’s also the author of the SubStack Big. Matt, thanks so much for joining me.

Matt Stoller

Hey, thanks for having me.

Talia Baroncelli

So I wanted to start off with a bigger-picture question. Why is it so important to focus on monopoly power? Why does the concentration of economic power in the hands of the few actually lead to the economy not functioning properly and also a concentration of political power?

Matt Stoller

Yeah, so I think there are a lot of ways to answer that question. I think the important one to understand is that what we face right now in our society is a lot of conservatives and liberals who disagree about the right way to run a society. I think everybody is feeling the downstream effects of tremendous corporate consolidation. So over the last 20 years, 75% of industries have gotten more concentrated, largely through mergers. But this isn’t everything from search engines, which we know with Google. There’s Google, and that’s it. But it’s also small markets, airlines, pharmaceuticals, and so on and so forth. It’s also small markets like mail sorting software or ultimate fighting championships. You could probably point at something and be like, that thing is probably monopoly, some insulation material, or something.

The problem with consolidation writ large, the problem with this monopolization across the economy, is that in every market where you have one or two firms in control of that market, you got one or two entities setting the terms, the prices, and the wages for that market. Effectively you have a private government and an authoritarian government in mail sorting software. That may not be a big deal to have mail sorting software, but the prices in terms of if you’re an engineer or you use the mail; it’s not that big a deal. Maybe it’s not that big a deal if the flight from your city to another city is you have to go through a third city to get there, and it could be a big deal if that’s cut entirely.

When you add all of this up, when you add up the monopolization in every market that people are now dealing with, you start to see that maybe we’re not living in a democratic society. Maybe, yeah, sure, we are voting. Sure, there’s political liberty to sort of say what you want, but all of the institutions, the private institutions that mediate how we live our lives, are increasingly controlled by one or two entities and are increasingly authoritarian. So that’s the political threat. Then the consequences of that are all the things that liberals and conservatives don’t like. There’s income inequality, asset inequality, and regional inequality as capital pools into a few cities and is drawn out everywhere else.

Censorship, as you have a small number of entities controlling the flow of information, addiction, and corruption– most of the things that people don’t like about the way society is being run now, this feeling that there are these distant masters that control stuff, that’s a function of monopolization, which is a function of public policy choices that we’ve made over the last 20 to 40 years to facilitate that kind of consolidation.

Talia Baroncelli

What would an alternative actually be? Could we potentially have publicly run companies that could then compete with private companies, or is that just something that’s unattainable?

Matt Stoller

Yeah, of course. There are lots of ways of structuring markets. So there’s this sort of sense on the Left that, well, we’re for markets or against markets, but that’s not a coherent way to think about the problem. No one has a problem with a farmer’s market. You go to a farmer’s market, it’s fine. People have problems with derivatives markets where you’re exchanging very fancy securities. There is a political difference between a slave market and a farmer’s market. Even though they both use the word market, they’re very different institutions. That’s because markets are public institutions that we set up through the rules that we write through politics.

So to answer your question, the monopolization that we have in our economy is unusual today. We didn’t have this in the 1970s, and we didn’t have it in the 1770s. There are hundreds of years of public utility regulation and anti-monopoly rules that we kind of threw out the window in the early ’80s and allowed this kind of consolidation to emerge, and there are lots of ways.

What’s exciting is that for the last five years or so, there’s been a lot of pushback, and we’re starting to change public policy to actually address consolidation. There are a lot of ways to do that. You can do it by just facilitating more competition. It doesn’t necessarily matter if the owner of the competitive firm is the government or not. There are well-run government firms, and there are badly-run government firms. It’s the same thing for the private sector or not. It’s just the question of is there consolidated power so you can allow for new entry. There are ways to make sure that that happens.

If an institution is an infrastructure, if it’s a core part of some sort of social input, like if it’s electricity, a water system, or maybe a search engine, or a social network, or an operating system, you can regulate it and put in certain pricing rules about what you can charge, who you can discriminate against. These rules have been in everything from railroads to telegraph systems to stage coaches going back hundreds of years. So we’ve done this before. The way to govern our society is through these rules, and we forgot about them for 30-40 years, and the massive monopolization, the distant masters controlling us, is the result. As we rediscover this language, yeah, we’re going to put controls on essentially like distant masters, and those controls are going to be anti-monopoly rules, regulatory choices, and so on and so forth.

Talia Baroncelli

Well, what actually happened in the past few decades? In the ’30s, ’40s, and ’50s, we had very effective antitrust laws, and they were widely enforced. Then I guess in the ’70s, with Chicago School economics being so popular, there was this push for deregulating markets and for not enforcing antitrust law. Maybe you can explain what happened in the ’70s. Why was that such a bad decade for regulation?

Matt Stoller

Yeah, if you’ve ever thought, if any of your audience members have ever thought, “oh, that’s economics, or that’s finance, that’s too difficult. I don’t know anything about that. I have strong views about this thing over here, but that stuff I don’t know about that. I’m a little bit reluctant to weigh in on that.” That’s sentiment. The idea that a citizen shouldn’t be able to weigh in on our commerce– how we trade with one another. That is what happened. This sense that a very fundamental aspect of the human experience, which is how we relate to one another through commerce, what we buy and sell from each other, ideas we trade with each other, and how we grow food and sell it to one another and process it. These are very political questions that have embedded power systems in them.

In the 1970s, collectively, we as a society decided that these were not political, that these were technical questions best left to experts, aka economists, the scientists of the economy, economists. That was a tremendous change in political power. This was not a right-wing thing. The Chicago School was conservative, but the left wing, at the time, there were a lot of socialists who agreed. They thought, “well, of course, we need the scientists to be running things. The scientists should run things, and then we should make things equal. The scientists should run things but make them equal.” But of course, we shouldn’t, we the rabble shouldn’t have any role in the economy.

Those two movements– it was sort of the Left saying, “let the scientists run things,” and the Right saying, “let the business people run things.” They’re both essentially elitist views. It crushed this anti-monopoly populist sentiment that normal people know what’s best for them. The transition in the ’70s was from the citizen to the consumer. So we stopped thinking of ourselves as citizens who make things, who trade with one another, who are participants in communities, and we started to think about ourselves as consumers. We said the whole point of this corporate stuff that’s going on is to serve consumers better with lower prices, and that’s all we’re going to think about. Not power, not rivalry, not citizens, and not society, but are we getting low prices in the short term? Low consumer prices in the short term.

Guess what that delivers? It delivers Walmart, whose slogan is ‘Everyday Low Prices’. The philosophy that I talked about where they just said all of these areas of law, we’re not going to enforce them to prevent concentrations of power. This kind of like Madisonian checks and balances that we did with the government the way we did that in the private sector through competition. We’re no longer going to do it that way. Instead, we’re going to go to the scientists, and we’re going to say make it efficient. Not just but efficient through price theory, and that’s for consumers.

Talia Baroncelli

But that’s also the consumer welfare standard. Right?

Matt Stoller

Yeah, you roll it forward 40 years, and that’s what you got. You got Google which is free. You got Amazon which is low prices. You got Facebook which is free. For economists, they look at this, and they see a beautiful world where everything is cheap and made in China, and all of these web institutions are– the most powerful ones in the world, are free, and this, to them, is nirvana.

Talia Baroncelli

Yeah, and right now, we’re living in this sort of existential crisis where climate change is a huge deal, and a lot of companies are hiding behind ESG [Environmental, Social, and Governance] policies to pretend they’re actually doing something for the climate. So I was wondering how antitrust law can actually be useful there. If we’re breaking up monopolies, how can we, at the same time, make these companies more receptive to adhering to the demands of a climate change movement?

Matt Stoller

Well, I’m not a specialist in energy, but I think one of the things that antitrust and anti-monopoly rules can do is they can prevent the status quo. The goal is basically to prevent the status quo from restraining new entrants into markets. Basically, if you have a new way of doing things, the person who runs the old way of doing things is going to try to stop them. They’re going to try to stop them through lots of different techniques. They might try to buy them out. They might try to go to the person’s potential customers and say, “you’re also a customer of mine, and I’ll screw you over.” They might try to sue them by using sham lawsuits. There are lots of techniques and tactics, but the basic idea is the king doesn’t want a rival.

I think we have a society where oil and gas are the dominant way that we run our energy systems. The utilities are– and coal as well– the utilities are very comfortable with that. If you try to bring in new ways of generating energy, then that can be pretty threatening to the entrenched incumbents.

Part of what we’re trying to do is to attack the ability of those entrenched incumbents to prevent new entrants into the market and to prevent new ways of doing things that are more efficient, that emit less carbon or no carbon. That’s kind of part of it. I don’t think that you can rely on antitrust or anti-monopoly rules to address all of it. You also just have to have the government say we’re going to get rid of carbon emissions if that’s what you want to do. But certainly, the way that we have set up our political economy, the incumbents are going to be really resistant to having new ways of doing things. Just like how Google is going to be really resistant to new ways of searching for things that they don’t control, the coal industry or whoever is going to be really resistant to ways of generating energy that is not the things that they sell. 

Talia Baroncelli

Yeah, and I guess another issue is how do you actually regulate certain industries when these regulatory bodies are captured by the industries they’re trying to regulate?

Matt Stoller

This is a good point because the idea of capture is actually a Chicago School idea. George Stigler [American Economist] came up with the idea to discredit the idea of regulation. He said regulators work for the industries that they regulate, therefore, don’t regulate because it’s just a way of facilitating more barriers to entry. He actually originally used electric utilities and showed that in regulated systems, the prices are higher than in systems that were not as regulated. Now, as it turns out, it was not true. It was wrong. It really was an attack on the idea of regulation itself. I think the notion of capture is like it’s not– I don’t think it makes sense.

I do think what happened is that the Left and the people who believe in the public interest lost their moral imagination. They didn’t for– the ’60s, ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s if you were like, “I want to help the public interest. I care about justice,” you would do things like civil rights law or environmental law or various other sorts of social questions. The idea that you might want to go into regulating electric utilities as a focal point of justice would be crazy. Why would you want to do that? The same thing is true for telecom. If you meet someone and they say, “yeah, I’m a telecommunications lawyer,” you wouldn’t necessarily think, “oh, this person really cares about social justice.” But, in fact, all the money and power in the world is in corporate America.

One of the things that are exciting is to see that people are starting to learn the language of business, the language of commerce, the language of regulation, the language of business law, and see that it’s this fundamental way of doing democracy. And that’s what I think is exciting. So it’s like the regulators in all of these areas, they’re outgunned, but also they haven’t seen young people coming in and learning this area and wanting to do that stuff for a long time. I think that’s changing. I think what you’re finding is there’s more interest in the moral choices that we’re making in all of these regulatory bodies.

Talia Baroncelli

Right, and there’s also a lot of, I guess, enthusiasm right now to actually do something, given the landscape, especially after Donald Trump and Big Tech being able to pry on people’s data on Google or Facebook and using their data. Basically, treating people as products, using their data, using it for marketing and for surveillance capitalism. I think we’re living in a context right now where in the U.S., we actually have trust in certain regulators. So perhaps there’s not complete regulatory capture, and we have trust in regulators such as Lina Khan [Chairperson of the Federal Trade Commission] at the FTC or Jonathan Kanter as the attorney at the antitrust division. So maybe you could talk about the division of labor between what Lina Khan is trying to actually do and what Jonathan Kanter is trying to do with his cases.

Matt Stoller

Yeah, I think there’s a basic narrative here that we have to overcome, which is a narrative of nihilism that our governing systems are fundamentally broken, which is a common thing, and we can’t regulate, we can’t do anything. That is not the way– when we had a more egalitarian society, that’s not the way that we thought about the world. We live in a democracy, and we have the honor of living in a democracy, and we have the honor of making these systems deliver for the public. If they’re not delivering for the public, then it is our responsibility to make them deliver for the public through our governing institutions, not through activism or holding signs, but through learning the law and learning the mechanisms to actually govern and working through institutions to do that. That’s when stuff worked. That’s what we did. It was messy, and there were lots of problems, but that’s welcome to self-government. Welcome to being a human being.

So what we have with the Federal Trade Commission and the antitrust division is a good example of how you actually get in there and start to turn things around. Basically, there are two agencies in government that handle antitrust. There are lots of agencies in government at the state, local level, and federal levels that handle regulation and deal with markets. Antitrust law is a specific sort of tip of the spear for certain corporations. It’s kind of like economy-wide. They don’t set prices, and they don’t regulate airlines, but they bring antitrust laws and make sure that markets are competitive in general.

There are two agencies that deal with that. One of them is the Federal Trade Commission, and the other is the Antitrust Division which is a part of the Department of Justice. We have two really good populist enforcers, one of which is Lina Khan, who’s the Chair of the Federal Trade Commission, and the other one is Jonathan Kanter, who’s the head of the Antitrust Division. Both of them are starting to challenge more mergers. They’re starting to bring conduct cases against standard tactics that would have been anti-competitive in the ’70s, but today people are shrugging and saying whatever, and now they’re trying to bring that kind of law back. They are trying to address problems like private equity, which is this kind of financial force. All of the money in the world is controlled by these big funds, and then they buy companies and lay people off and merge them together into monopolies. It’s this whole sort of scam at the center of the economy, and antitrust law can touch that. So Kanter and Kahn are both trying to get at it. They’re bringing cases, and they’re being heard by the courts, and they’re making changes in the policy decision really in the guts of the government. The kind of places that you or I wouldn’t necessarily notice. I noticed it, but that’s because it’s what I do.

Everybody thinks there are conspiracies about how things work, and it’s kind of true. They’re more open and boring than people assume, but they’re kind of like working the levers on behalf of the public. It’s kind of like a slow turnaround, but now there are a bunch of antitrust suits against Google, there are antitrust suits against pesticide makers, against people who are firms that make locks for doors. There are investigations of Amazon, Apple’s App Store, and lots of sort of different areas.

Look, these things are going to take a while because the courts– you don’t turn around a giant ship instantly, but they’re starting to do the turnaround, and we’re starting to see impacts.

Talia Baroncelli

Right, and do you think that with the midterms, with any of those political changes in the makeup of Congress, if we’ll actually see more antitrust laws being implemented or will Congress actually act and pass any new laws in this [inaudible 00:21:59]?

Matt Stoller

I don’t know. The answer is yes. I just don’t know when. So it could be this week, it could be in a year. I think in five years, we will have different antitrust laws. I just don’t know when. I mean, the House Republican leadership is very hostile to new antitrust legislation, most of it. In the next two years, it looks kind of not that promising, but their own caucus, so Republican voters and then Republican members of Congress, some of them want antitrust legislation. So you have this weird dynamic. Then the Senate is controlled by Democrats. The Democrats are pretty good on strengthening antitrust. However, Chuck Schumer [Majority Leader of the United States Senate] doesn’t want to. He hates antitrust, so he won’t bring them to a vote.

Then there are lots of states which are adhering to antitrust bills. We’re in the early stages, and I think we’re going to have wholesale reorganization of antitrust law. It takes time. This is a big country, and you have to generate some level of consensus that the way we’ve been running business is causing significant problems, and we should run our business systems in a different way. I think we’ve done a pretty good job of convincing people that the way that we run our business systems is a problem, that there’s been too much consolidation, and now we’re in this process of explaining and debating how to deal with that. We haven’t quite settled on some sort of consensus on what to do, but I think we’re getting there.

Talia Baroncelli

Okay, can you also talk about the effect of monopolies on inflation? Because I think after the CARES Act [Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act], we saw this massive upward transfer of wealth, and there are different narratives as to what actually led to inflation. So some people would say that people were just flush with money, and they had all this extra money to spend that drove inflation, and so the fault is on government spending as opposed to potentially looking at how firms collude and drive prices up or even price stakes.

Matt Stoller

Yeah, so this is a good question. The CARES Act, for people that don’t know, was the bill that Congress passed right when the pandemic hit to try to deal with the fact that we were experiencing an economic collapse. So this was the checks that people got, increased unemployment loans to small businesses, and then a bailout for Wall Street. Those were paid in some [inaudible 00:24:34]. That was basically the package.

So one of the things that a consolidated economy does is it reduces the amount of spare capacity that we have. When you have five companies in a market, and each of them has a bunch of factories, you have a certain amount of capacity in the market. If they consolidate into, say, two companies, those companies, what they want to do is lower output and raise prices. That’s generally what monopolies often do. They’ll take factories, and they’ll shut them down, or they’ll take factories, and they’ll offshore them to China. That’s been the other sort of strategy.

Now, you can see this with railroads, for example. We only have, I think, seven class-one railroads. We used to have dozens of class-one railroads. They have been shutting down routes. They’ve been laying off workers for a long time. We saw this with the strike. But this has been a problem, or this has been a dynamic where the railroads are like, “we want to be more profitable, so we’re going to take capacity offline.” It’s true for the shipping industry. It’s true for a lot of different industries, semiconductors.

Now, what happens when you get rid of slack? Well, you’re not ready for a shock to the system. All of a sudden, if you have an economy full of bottlenecks, which is what a monopoly is, it’s basically a bottleneck; then when you have a shock to the system, the shock is going to be accelerated by the bottlenecks that people have. The monopolist, when they see, “oh, my gosh, everyone needs what I have,” all of a sudden, “I’m going to raise my prices a lot; that’s what I get to do.” Versus if there’s a competitive market where you have a number of firms that are selling something, they’ll raise their prices because there’s a lot of demand, but not as much. Then they’ll also invest in more capacity so that they can meet the demand. That’s what you didn’t really see when COVID hit, all of a sudden, there was all this pricing power that consolidated firms had, and so they exploited it. You also had a lot less slack in the economy, so you couldn’t just produce more because those factories had been shuttered.

Then the CARES Act, because it had a bailout for Wall Street, it did facilitate a lot more mergers, and so there was more consolidation as a result of the policy of the CARES Act to address COVID. I think what it did is it didn’t just, I think, accelerated inflation. Inflation happened because of COVID. You shut the economy down, and you turn it back on, you’re just going to have problems. When we demobilized from World War I or from World War II, you had significant inflation, and that’s just because everything was out of whack and transitioning back to a peacetime economy. You’re going to have– pricing signals are going to go kerflooey, and that’s a little bit of what happened with COVID. The reason it got much worse than it had to be is because we had that consolidated economy. I think that answers the question.

Talia Baroncelli

Yeah, it does. Also, looking at the Fed, are you supportive of such large increases in interest rates, or do you think that they’ve been vastly ineffective?

Matt Stoller

I’m kind of unusual for a progressive. In that, I do think that the Fed should be tightening monetary conditions. There’s this view that goes back– you can see it– like we’ve had zero. So the Federal Reserve, I look at it, there’s something called the Cantillon effect. The Cantillon effect comes from this 18th-century economist who basically said that the closer you are– the king controls monetary policy. Essentially, the king controls the gold in an economy. If there’s a gold mine that’s discovered, the people that are closer to the gold mine or that are friends with the king are going to get access to the gold first. They’re going to be able to use that money to buy up assets before that gold gets to everyone else. Then eventually, when it gets to everyone else, there’ll be inflation and whatnot. But essentially, it was an argument about monetary policy, and it was saying the closer you are to the institutional creators of money, the more power you have. That can be changed. You can build institutions that move money to everyone equally, but the idea is money is not neutral. We had that. We had a lot of facilities to allow more small business lending and lending to ordinary people. Those are kind of atrophied.

So today, the Federal Reserve, which would be, I guess, the gold mine right in the center of the economy, when it prints money, the people that get it first are on Wall Street. So a lot of liberals or lefties think, well, the Fed should kind of keep interest rates low because this will help ordinary people. But in fact, when the Fed keeps interest rates low, they’re not keeping interest rates low for you or me. I mean, I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but it’s not like my credit card interest rates have gone down since the Fed lowered rates in 2010.

Talia Baroncelli

I’m in Germany, so it’s a totally different regulatory space.

Matt Stoller

Right, well, I can just say that they haven’t. The credit card interest rates, interest rates on Wall Street were 0%, and the credit card interest rates were 20%. Credit cards were a result of market power, not the Fed lowering or raising it. The point is that Wall Street gets a certain number of interest rates. Wall Street has an interest rate, and then ordinary people have an interest rate. I think we shouldn’t confuse the two of them.

Now, the problem with low-interest rates for Wall Street when the Fed keeps interest rates low is that Wall Street takes that money and then uses it to engage in mergers and shut down factories and stuff like that. It doesn’t reach the real economy. It doesn’t reach ordinary people. What’s happened since the Fed started raising interest rates is you’ve seen a lot of the scams that Wall Street has been pursuing have fallen apart.

Crypto is a good example. Crypto is just a bunch of crime and bullshit. Since the Fed started to tighten financial conditions, it’s all fallen apart. And that’s a good thing. Private equity firms are having trouble raising money. There are all sorts of Ponzi schemes in the economy that are falling apart. I actually think it’s a good thing that the Fed is tightening financial conditions because I think there was too much easy money. It wasn’t flowing to normal people to borrow things and build factories, not that normal people build factories, but it wasn’t flowing to normal people to take out loans for what they wanted to do. It was flowing to powerful people that were using it for stock buybacks, mergers, acquisitions, executive compensation, and stuff like that. That’s all just a bunch of– that’s not a useful investment.

Talia Baroncelli

There’s also another thing that the Fed has been doing, and I don’t quite understand it, but I guess it’s called normalization. So when you sort of shrink your balance sheet and roll off the assets that you own. How does that affect the housing market? Does that in any way address some of the barriers that people have in trying to buy a house in the U.S., or what is independent of that?

Matt Stoller

The Fed was basically directly lending money to people to buy houses. That is one way to put it. There are complicated ways of talking about it. They were saying, “we’re going to give money to the banks that are lending money to people to buy houses.” They gave trillions of dollars to do that. So what happened? People bought a lot of houses, and housing prices skyrocketed. They went up by 40% during the pandemic, which is crazy. It’s just way too much and makes it unaffordable to buy a house.

What the Fed has done since then is they’ve started saying, “okay, we’re not going to lend money to people to buy houses. In fact, we’re going to start to take some of that money back.” The result is that it’s much more expensive to buy a house if you’re a buyer. Housing prices have started to come down a little bit. There’s still a giant affordability crisis, but the bubble itself in housing has declined a little bit.

Talia Baroncelli

Okay, and maybe we can quickly talk about crypto because I feel like this is the sort of Emperor’s New Clothes moment where the whole thing is being exposed as something that’s not as innovative as people thought it would be. Yeah, maybe just lay out what SBF [Sam Bankman-Fried] and FTX are. It’s a crypto exchange, but why is this scam and all the frauds that SBF was engaging in with his other company Alameda, why is this such a big deal, and what will this lead to?

Matt Stoller

Well, let’s just start with crypto because I think people like to look at Sam Bankman-Fried and FTX and think that it’s some sort of isolated incident. A lot of people in crypto are like, “oh, that’s not us. That’s just the bad guy of crypto.” We got to start with the premise. Crypto is bullshit. It’s just a series of get-rich-quick schemes, fraud, and money laundering. It’s not a technologically innovative thing.

People hear about this thing called the blockchain. The blockchain is just a different way to have a spreadsheet. That’s all it is. It’s like an Excel spreadsheet, except done in a slightly different way. All cryptocurrency is, is one of these spreadsheets. You put markings in it, and you call it whatever you want to call it– Ethereum or Solana. You just say, “alright, you have five Solana, according to the spreadsheet.” The spreadsheet is called Solana. “I have three Solana, and I’m going to trade with you.” It’s got some attributes of private money, but that’s all it is. It’s just markings in a spreadsheet. It’s valuable insofar as people are willing to buy it. If you and I both think Solana has value, then I guess it has some value temporarily.

It’s very much like in the 1920s, there was a Florida real estate bubble, and people in New York were trading lots of land in Florida. As it turns out, some of these lots of land didn’t exist. They were in cities that didn’t exist. So does that mean that those lots of land have no value? Well, in a sense, yes. But also, as people are trading them, they’re worth what people are paying, even though it’s bullshit. This is a term called the ‘bezzle’ that John Kenneth Galbraith coined, which is fraudulent stuff has value as long as the bubble keeps going, but once the bubble pops, it no longer has value. That’s what crypto is.

Crypto has no use cases except gambling, money laundering, and fraud. You can frame money laundering in a nice way if you want. You can say this lets us move money outside the purview of the authoritarian regimes, or this gives us financial privacy, but it’s just money laundering. So, of course, it attracts criminals. FTX and Sam Bankman-Fried are just criminals that were stealing their customers’ money and using sham transactions to disguise the fact that they were stealing from people who were mostly engaged in an attempt to take advantage of get-rich-quick schemes. It’s kind of hard to be super sympathetic to the people whose money they stole. But that’s what was going on.

There are a whole series of interlinked institutions that are just as fraudulent as FTX, some of which collapsed. Some Ponzi schemes collapsed six months ago, three months ago, or a month ago. More of them are going to collapse in a month or two or three, but it’s all going to collapse because there’s no point. It’s high finance without purpose. Of course, it’s just full of criminals and money launderers, and Sam Bankman-Fried is just one more.

Talia Baroncelli

Right. But some people would say that we could potentially regulate it as security by the SEC, the Security Exchange Committee, or as a commodity by the CFTC [Commodity Futures Trading Commission]. In Europe, for example, one of the board members at the ECB [European Central Bank], Fabio Panetta, yesterday, was just saying that we need to regulate crypto internationally but also get rid of energy-intensive crypto. The Europeans seem to be very focused on regulating. I think your opinion is that we should just let it crash and burn, right?

Matt Stoller

Yeah. Look, there’s this annoying coded language where people say, “oh, we need to regulate crypto.” You can regulate crypto by allowing people to gamble and do stupid things, or you can regulate crypto by saying you have to have disclosure regimes and consumer protections and effectively make it not economical to have. So that’s what the Securities and Exchange Commission wants to do, is regulate crypto. If you regulated crypto and make them basically what a coin is, essentially, it’s like a stock, only there’s no point. Imagine if you owned a share of IBM [International Business Machines Corporation], but there was no business there. There’s no business behind it. That’s what it is. If you have to disclose things and have some consumer protection rules in place, then it’s not worth it to have that gambling instrument. It’s costly, and there’s no point behind it. So I think that’s the way to regulate it and get rid of it.

I’ll say that European regulators are generally weak, and it’s more like they’re weak and they’re losers. My experience with the U.S. is that the regulatory scheme, sometimes you have people that are doing really useful things. Gary Gensler [Chairperson, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission] was doing really useful things at the SEC, but it’s pretty corrupt. We’re sort of upfront about how corrupt it is. In Europe, it’s just a bunch of loser technocrats that are always pretending they’re trying to do something, but they aren’t because Europe is fundamentally, the EU is fundamentally a dysfunctional structure that can’t actually do anything well.

Talia Baroncelli

It lacks democratic channels. One of the issues is that because it’s a supernational entity, it represents so many nation-states, and it’s difficult to harmonize in certain areas.

Matt Stoller

You need consensus among 27 states, and then the bureaucrats who live in Brussels all kind of secretly have contempt for democracy and are all really passive-aggressive and don’t actually like to do anything. This is why they’ve had press releases for ten years about how they’re cracking down on Google. Google seems pretty powerful to me. In the U.S., we’re just like, “yeah, everyone’s paid off by Google,” and in Europe, they’re like, “we’ve been cracking down.” Do you want the passive-aggressive version or not? Personally, I don’t like the passive-aggressive version.

Talia Baroncelli

Yeah, it’s this weird thing of trying to get a consensus without actually really doing anything and having different regulatory frameworks. I do agree that there’s this tendency to just valorize technocratic thinking and to just trust the elites without actually questioning what they’re doing and to have some sort of democratic accountability. We saw this with the Greek bailouts. 

Matt Stoller

Yeah, that was a fucking disaster. The other thing is they love to whine about the U.S. The U.S.–

Talia Baroncelli

Well, I love to whine about the U.S. too, but for different reasons.

Matt Stoller

Yeah, but they hate the U.S. for the wrong reasons. There are a lot of criticisms of America that make a lot of sense. But the European bureaucrats dislike the U.S. They whine about the U.S. for the wrong reasons. They are basically mad at the U.S. for giving them free defense and access to American markets. They’re just upset because they don’t want to do anything, and they want someone to blame. It’s very much like they have this childlike frustration with their parents. They look at the U.S. as their parents and they don’t want to admit that they don’t actually spend any money on defense or have the ability to do anything geopolitically.

Talia Baroncelli

They’re barely meeting their 2% commitments to NATO, and yet they want the U.S. to bankroll them and basically give them all the weapons that they need.

Matt Stoller

That’s right. The U.S. just passed a bill to manufacture electric vehicles here. Then Europe is like, “this is discriminating against European companies, and it’s really protectionist, and how dare you. And we’re the bulwark of free trade.” And it’s like, that’s just total bullshit. Europe is super protectionist. To export a car from the U.S. to Europe, it’s a 10% tariff. To export a car from Europe to the U.S., it’s a 2.5% tariff. I’m not a free trader. I don’t care. I’m just sort of like, build your own shit.

Talia Baroncelli

Yeah, exactly. Wasn’t that also a remnant of the whole Washington consensus, this push for deregulation and for privatization? And it’s like, okay, we’re going to ensure that in other countries that maybe are less powerful in the global south, that they won’t be able to implement their own protectionist frameworks or to enforce subsidies because the EU doesn’t want that and the U.S. doesn’t want that. If you look at the EU, they have some of the largest subsidies when it comes to agriculture and other areas. So it is hugely hypocritical that certain countries are expected to not have protectionist measures, and then other countries can go ahead and do this.

Matt Stoller

I agree with that. You also look at the U.S. with the vaccines. The U.S., actually, for the first time, said, “oh, we should share the IP with the rest of the world.” And it was like, where were the bad guys being like, “no, we got to do what Pharma wants.” It was Germany. Germany was the lead in trying to block that and successfully blocked the ability. 

Talia Baroncelli

Bill Gates also didn’t want some of–

Matt Stoller

Yeah, but Bill Gates doesn’t get a vote, formally. 

Talia Baroncelli

But he was supporting COVAX, and COVAX had a very specific mandate and intention to basically give money to other countries but to not share the technology with them for them to develop their own vaccine.

Matt Stoller

That’s right. I think that’s correct that the general European approach and I think the U.S. approach– the neoliberal approach in the U.S. In the 1990s was really destructive and was basically saying to smaller countries and weaker countries, “do what we want, and we’re going to do what we want and fuck you.” That was sort of the attitude, and it was really destructive. The U.S. is moving away from that framework. It’s still in transition, but Europe is kind of the last holdout.

Talia Baroncelli

The last neoliberals.

Matt Stoller

I think you can see that. What?

Talia Baroncelli

The last neoliberals. They don’t want to give up. It is ironic being here sometimes because they do have this contempt for the U.S. They really support these transatlantic relationships, but they seem to focus on the wrong thing. So, for example, when Joe Biden came to power, they’re like, “oh, now we have this amazing transatlantic relationship again.” They didn’t seem to identify how Trump wasn’t really an anomaly. Just because he was not super supportive of those relationships, he wasn’t this anomaly, the only bad guy. I mean, there are certain trends in American hegemony that was taking place prior to that, and they seem to fixate on the wrong things and amplify it.

Matt Stoller

Yeah, they’re obsessed with manners. That’s what it was.

Talia Baroncelli

Right. Who cares that we have a better transatlantic relationship now? What does that even mean? You can go back to other U.S. administrations and look at the–

Matt Stoller

Well, I mean, I think you can see, like, it’s most obvious when it comes to China. The Germans are basically cool with fascism. They’re cool with fascism again, which happens in Germany. Chinese fascism is totally fine to the German auto industry. They’re a-okay with that. Basically, German politics is don’t disrupt an older German man’s pleasant vacation. If you do that, they will murder an endless number of people to make sure that their vacation is pleasant. That was Angela Merkel’s policy framework. It’s sociopathic. The Germans have been engaged– they got cheap stuff from China, cheap gas from Russia, and free defense from the U.S. They’re just a giant free rider, and they just crushed Greece.

Talia Baroncelli

They basically crushed Greece so that Greece could pay back German and French banks for all the easy money that they received. Then they framed it as this crisis of a sovereign debt crisis.

Matt Stoller

The lazy Greeks.

Talia Baroncelli

Yeah, those lazy Greeks. 

Matt Stoller

There was a weird racist component, too, that was hilarious.

Talia Baroncelli

Yeah, Wolfgang Schäuble, who was the Finance Minister at the time, he was just such a freak. He really got off on demonizing the Greeks. It was the weirdest thing to witness at the time.

Matt Stoller

Yeah, I went over to Germany at a certain point, and I think I got into a shouting match with the mayor of some town over it. I was like, “you’re fucking over the Greeks.” He was like, “the German foreign policy is to be seen as the nice country.” And I’m like, “you’re not nice. You’re fucking over the Greeks.” He’s like, “oh, that’s more complicated.” I always get into shouting matches with Germany and always get to the point where I’m like, “you were the Nazis. You’re not the Nazis anymore, but you don’t get credit. You don’t get credit for not being Nazis anymore.” They want credit for, like, “well, we know how to deal with Nazis.” It’s like, no, you don’t.

Talia Baroncelli

No. It’s a huge problem in Germany now because a lot of times, they tend to conflate critique of the Israeli government, like antizionism, as being antisemitic, which is obviously not the case. They don’t seem to realize that they’re funding certain military companies that are involved–

Matt Stoller

The whole Israel thing is– the politics there are kind of hilarious. I don’t want to get into Israel too much, but one of the most successful anti-monopoly movements in the world was in Israel in 2011, which is its own kind of interesting thing.

Talia Baroncelli

Yeah, well, thanks for joining us. It would be great to have you on again, and thanks a lot, Matt.

Matt Stoller

Alright, thanks so much. Talk to you later.

Talia Baroncelli

Take care. Bye.



Talia Baroncelli 

Hola. Soy Talia Baroncelli y esto es theAnalysis.news. 

En breve me acompañará Matt Stoller para hablar sobre el poder de los monopolios y su impacto en la esfera política. 

Por favor, no olvide visitar nuestro sitio web, theAnalysis.news, para donar y registrar su correo electrónico. 

Vuelvo en un segundo. 

Ahora me acompaña Matt Stoller. Es el director de investigación en el American Economic Liberties Project y autor del libro Goliath: The 100-Year War Between Monopoly Power and Democracy. También es el autor de SubStack BIG

Matt, muchas gracias por acompañarme. 

Matt Stoller

Hola, gracias por recibirme. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Bien, quería comenzar con una pregunta más amplia. ¿Por qué es tan importante centrarse en el poder de los monopolios? ¿Por qué la concentración del poder económico en manos de unos pocos en realidad conduce a que la economía no funcione correctamente y también a una concentración del poder político? 

Matt Stoller

Sí, creo que hay muchas maneras de responder a esa pregunta. 

Creo que lo importante es entender que ahora mismo en nuestra sociedad tenemos una gran cantidad de conservadores y liberales que no se ponen de acuerdo sobre la forma correcta de dirigir una sociedad.

Creo que todo el mundo está sintiendo los efectos posteriores de la tremenda consolidación corporativa. En los últimos 20 años, el 75 % de las industrias se han vuelto más concentradas, en gran parte a través de fusiones. Como los motores de búsqueda, con Google. Está Google, y eso es todo. También son mercados pequeños, aerolíneas, productos farmacéuticos, etc., etc. También son mercados pequeños como el software de clasificación de correo o los campeonatos de lucha. Podrías señalar algo y decir: “Eso es probablemente un monopolio”, algún material de aislamiento o algo así. 

El problema de la consolidación a gran escala, el problema con esta monopolización en toda la economía, es que en cada mercado donde una o dos empresas tienen el control de ese mercado, una o dos entidades establecen los términos, los precios y los salarios para ese mercado. En términos reales, tienes un Gobierno privado, y un Gobierno autoritario. En el software de clasificación de correo, puede que no sea grave tener un software de clasificación de correo. Los precios, si eres ingeniero o usas el correo, no es tan grave. Quizá no es tan grave si para volar de tu ciudad a otra ciudad tienes que pasar por una tercera ciudad para llegar allí, y podría ser un problema si eso se elimina por completo. 

Cuando sumas todo esto, cuando sumas la monopolización en todos los mercados que tenemos ahora, empiezas a ver que quizá no estamos viviendo en una sociedad democrática. Sí, claro, votamos. Claro, hay libertad política para decir lo que quieras. Pero todas las instituciones, las instituciones privadas que regulan cómo vivimos nuestras vidas, están cada vez más controladas por una o dos entidades y son cada vez más autoritarias. 

Así que esa es la amenaza política. Las consecuencias de esto son todas las cosas que a los liberales y conservadores no les gustan. Hay desigualdad de ingresos, desigualdad de activos y desigualdad regional cuando el capital se acumula en unas pocas ciudades y se extrae del resto. Censura, cuando tienes un pequeño número de entidades que controlan el flujo de información. Adicción… corrupción… La mayoría de las cosas que a la gente no le gustan sobre la forma en que se gestiona la sociedad ahora, esta percepción de que existen estos maestros distantes que controlan todo, eso es una función de la monopolización, es una función de las decisiones en política pública que hemos tomado en los últimos 20 a 40 años para facilitar ese tipo de consolidación. 

Talia Baroncelli 

¿Cuál sería realmente una alternativa? ¿Podríamos tener empresas públicas que luego podrían competir con las empresas privadas, o es algo inalcanzable? 

Matt Stoller

Sí, por supuesto. Hay muchas maneras de estructurar los mercados. 

Existe esta idea en la izquierda de que, bueno, estamos a favor de los mercados o en contra de los mercados, pero esa no es una forma coherente de encarar el problema. Nadie se opone a los mercados de agricultores. Vas a un mercado de agricultores, está bien. La gente se opone a los mercados de derivados, donde se negocian valores muy complicados. Hay una diferencia política entre un mercado de esclavos y un mercado de agricultores. Aunque ambos usan la palabra mercado, son instituciones muy diferentes. Eso es porque los mercados son instituciones públicas que establecemos mediante reglas que escribimos mediante la política. 

Entonces, para responder a tu pregunta, la monopolización que tenemos en nuestra economía es inusual. No teníamos esto en la década de 1970, y no lo teníamos en la década de 1770. Hay cientos de años de regulación de servicios públicos y reglas antimonopolio que tiramos por la ventana a principios de los 80 y esto permitió que surgiera este tipo de consolidación, y hay muchas formas… Lo emocionante es que, durante los últimos cinco años más o menos, ha habido una reacción a esto, y estamos empezando a cambiar la política pública para enfrentarnos realmente a la consolidación. 

Hay muchas maneras de hacer eso. Puedes hacerlo simplemente facilitando más competencia. No necesariamente importa si el dueño de la empresa competitiva es el Gobierno o no. Hay empresas gubernamentales bien administradas y empresas gubernamentales mal administradas. Es lo mismo para el sector privado, es solo cuestión de si hay un poder consolidado que no permite la entrada de nuevos jugadores. Hay maneras de asegurarse de que eso suceda. Si una institución es, por ejemplo, infraestructura, si es una parte central de algún tipo de aporte social, como electricidad, un sistema de agua, o quizá un motor de búsqueda, o una red social, o un sistema operativo, puedes regularla y establecer ciertas reglas de precios sobre cuánto puedes cobrar, a quién puedes discriminar. 

Estas reglas se han aplicado a todo, desde ferrocarriles hasta sistemas de telégrafo o las diligencias, que se remontan cientos de años. Así que hemos hecho esto antes. La forma de manejar nuestra sociedad es a través de estas reglas, y nos olvidamos de ellas en los últimos 30-40 años y el resultado es la monopolización generalizada, los maestros distantes que nos controlan. A medida que redescubrimos este idioma, sí, vamos a poner controles sobre estos maestros distantes, y esos controles van a ser normativas antimonopolio, políticas regulatorias, etc. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Bien, ¿qué ha sucedido realmente en las últimas décadas? En los años 30, 40 y 50 teníamos leyes antimonopolio muy efectivas y se aplicaban ampliamente. Luego, supongo que en los años 70, con la popularidad de la Escuela de Chicago, se intentó desregular los mercados y no hacer cumplir la ley antimonopolio. Quizá puedas explicar lo que pasó en los años 70. ¿Por qué fue una década tan mala para la regulación? 

Matt Stoller

Sí, si alguna vez has pensado, si alguna persona en tu audiencia alguna vez ha pensado: “Eso es economía, o finanzas, es demasiado difícil. No sé nada de eso. Tengo firmes opiniones sobre esto, pero no sé nada sobre eso. Soy un poco reacio a opinar sobre eso”. Ese sentimiento, la idea de que un ciudadano no debería poder opinar sobre nuestro comercio, cómo comerciamos unos con otros, eso es lo que pasó. Esta noción de que un aspecto muy fundamental de la experiencia humana, que es cómo nos relacionamos entre nosotros a través del comercio, lo que compramos y vendemos, las ideas que intercambiamos, y cómo cultivamos alimentos y los vendemos unos a otros y los procesamos, estas son cuestiones muy políticas que tienen sistemas de poder integradas en ellas. 

En la década de 1970, colectivamente, nosotros como sociedad decidimos que no eran políticas, que estas eran cuestiones técnicas que era mejor dejar en manos de los expertos, también conocidos como economistas, los científicos de la economía, los economistas. Ese fue un cambio tremendo en el poder político. No era algo de la derecha. Los de la Escuela de Chicago eran conservadores, pero en la izquierda, en ese momento, había muchos socialistas que estaban de acuerdo. Pensaron: “Bueno, por supuesto, necesitamos que los científicos dirijan todo esto, los científicos deberían dirigir las cosas, y luego deberíamos hacerlas igualitarias. Los científicos deberían hacer las cosas igualitarias”. Pero, por supuesto, nosotros, el populacho, no deberíamos tener ningún papel en la economía. 

Esos dos movimientos, la izquierda, que decía: “Dejemos que los científicos dirijan las cosas”, y la derecha, que decía: “Dejen que los empresarios dirijan las cosas”, porque ambos son puntos de vista esencialmente elitistas, aplastaron este sentimiento populista y antimonopolio que la gente normal sabe que es lo mejor para ellos. 

La transición en los años 70 fue de ciudadano a consumidor. Dejamos de pensar en nosotros mismos como ciudadanos que hacen cosas, que comercian entre sí, que son participantes en comunidades, y empezamos a pensar en nosotros mismos como consumidores. La razón de toda esta actividad corporativa que está teniendo lugar es servir mejor a los consumidores con precios más bajos, y vamos a concentrarnos en eso. Ni el poder, ni la rivalidad, ni los ciudadanos, ni la sociedad, sino: ¿estamos consiguiendo precios bajos a corto plazo, bajos precios para el consumidor a corto plazo? Adivina a qué lleva eso. Lleva a Walmart, cuyo eslogan es ‘Precios bajos todos los días’. La filosofía de la que he hablado, donde simplemente dijeron: “Todas estas áreas de la ley no las vamos a hacer cumplir para evitar concentraciones de poder, este tipo de controles y equilibrios de Madison que hicimos con el Gobierno como hicimos en el sector privado a través de la competencia… Ya no lo vamos a hacer así, sino que vamos a ir a los científicos y les vamos a decir: “Háganlo eficiente”. No justo, sino eficiente, mediante la teoría de precios, para los consumidores. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Pero ese es también el estándar de bienestar del consumidor. ¿No?

Matt Stoller

Sí, avanzas 40 años y eso es lo que tienes. Tienes Google, que es gratis. Tienes Amazon, que tiene precios bajos. Tienes Facebook, que es gratis. Los economistas miran esto y ven un mundo hermoso donde todo es barato y hecho en China, y todas estas instituciones web son… Las más poderosas del mundo son gratuitas, y esto para ellos es el nirvana. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Sí, y en este momento estamos viviendo esta especie de crisis existencial donde el cambio climático es un gran problema y muchas empresas se esconden detrás de las políticas ASG [Ambiental, Social y de Gobernanza] fingiendo que en realidad están haciendo algo por el clima. Así que me preguntaba cómo la ley antimonopolio puede ser realmente útil ahí. Si estamos acabando con los monopolios, ¿cómo podemos al mismo tiempo hacer que estas empresas sean más receptivas a acceder a las demandas de un movimiento de cambio climático? 

Matt Stoller

Bueno, yo no soy especialista en energía, pero creo que una de las cosas que las normas antitrust y antimonopolio pueden hacer es evitar que el statu quo… El objetivo es básicamente evitar que el statu quo bloquee la entrada de nuevos participantes en los mercados. Básicamente, si tienes una nueva forma de hacer las cosas, la persona al cargo de la vieja forma de hacer las cosas va a tratar de detenerlos. Y lo hará mediante muchas técnicas diferentes. Podría tratar de comprarlos. Podría tratar de dirigirse a los clientes potenciales de la persona y decirles: “Tú también eres cliente mío y te voy a joder”. Podría tratar de demandarlos mediante juicios falsos. 

Hay muchas técnicas y tácticas, pero la idea básica es que el rey no quiere un rival. Creo que tenemos una sociedad donde el petróleo y el gas son la forma dominante en que operamos nuestros sistemas energéticos. Para los servicios públicos -junto con el carbón- es muy ventajosa. Intentar introducir nuevas formas de generar energía puede suponer una amenaza para los elementos ya asentados en el mercado. Parte de lo que estamos tratando de hacer es que los elementos asentados no puedan evitar la entrada de nuevos participantes en el mercado ni bloquear nuevas formas de hacer las cosas que sean más eficientes, que emitan menos carbono o nada. 

Eso es parte de eso. No creo que podamos depender de normas antimonopolio o antitrust para resolverlo todo. También tienes que hacer que el Gobierno diga: “Vamos a eliminar las emisiones de carbono si eso es lo que quieren”. Pero, ciertamente, por la forma en que hemos creado nuestra economía política, los elementos asentados van a oponerse a nuevas formas de hacer las cosas. Al igual que Google va a oponerse a nuevas formas de buscar información que ellos no controlen, la industria del carbón o quien sea va a oponerse a formas de generar energía que no sean lo que ellos venden. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Sí, y supongo que otro problema es cómo regulas realmente ciertas industrias cuando estos organismos reguladores son capturados por las industrias que están tratando de regular. 

Matt Stoller

Es una buena observación porque la idea de captura es en realidad una idea de la Escuela de Chicago. George Stigler [economista estadounidense] tuvo la idea de desacreditar la idea de regulación. Dijo: “Los reguladores trabajan para las industrias que regulan, por lo tanto, no regulen, porque es solo una forma de levantar más barreras que impiden la permeabilidad”. De hecho, originariamente usó servicios eléctricos y demostró que en sistemas regulados, los precios son más altos que en sistemas que no estaban tan regulados. Resulta que no era cierto. Se equivocó. Realmente fue un ataque a la idea misma de la regulación. 

Creo que la noción de captura es como si no fuera… No creo que tenga sentido. Creo que lo que pasó es que la izquierda, y la gente que cree en el interés público, perdió su imaginación moral. No lo hicieron por… En los años 60, 70, 80 y 90, si pensabas: “Quiero trabajar por el interés público. Me importa la justicia”, hacías cosas como la ley de derechos civiles o la ley ambiental o varios otros tipos de cuestiones sociales. La idea de que podrías querer entrar en la regulación de los servicios públicos de electricidad como punto focal de la justicia habría sido una locura. ¿Por qué querrías hacer eso? Lo mismo es cierto para las telecomunicaciones. Si te encuentras con alguien y te dice: “Sí, soy abogado de telecomunicaciones”, no pensarías necesariamente: “Oh, esta persona realmente se preocupa por la justicia social”. Pero, de hecho, todo el dinero y el poder del mundo están en las empresas estadounidenses. 

Una de las cosas que es emocionante es ver que la gente está empezando a aprender el lenguaje de los negocios, el lenguaje del comercio, el lenguaje de la regulación y el lenguaje de la ley empresarial, y a ver que es una forma fundamental de hacer democracia. Y eso es lo que creo que es emocionante. Así que los reguladores en todas estas áreas están en inferioridad de condiciones, pero no han visto a los jóvenes entrar y aprender esta área y querer hacer esas cosas desde hace mucho tiempo. Creo que eso está cambiando. Creo que lo que vemos ahora es que hay más interés en las opciones morales que estamos tomando en todos estos organismos reguladores. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Sí, y también hay mucho… entusiasmo en este momento por hacer algo, dado el panorama, especialmente después de Donald Trump y que Big Tech puede acceder a los datos de las personas en Google o Facebook y utilizar sus datos, básicamente, tratando a las personas como productos, usar sus datos para marketing y para el capitalismo de vigilancia. Creo que estamos viviendo en un contexto en este momento en los EE. UU. en el que de verdad confiamos en ciertos reguladores. Entonces, quizá no haya una captura regulatoria completa y confiamos en reguladores como Lina Khan [presidenta de la Comisión Federal de Comercio] en la CFC o Jonathan Kanter, abogado de la División Antimonopolio. Así que quizá podrías hablar sobre la división de trabajo entre lo que Lina Khan está tratando de hacer realmente y lo que Jonathan Kanter está tratando de hacer con sus casos. 

Matt Stoller

Sí, creo que hay una narrativa básica aquí que tenemos que superar, y es la narrativa del nihilismo, que nuestros sistemas de Gobierno están rotos, que es algo común, y no podemos regular, no podemos hacer nada. Ese no es el camino… Cuando teníamos una sociedad más igualitaria, esa no era la forma en que veíamos el mundo. Vivimos en una democracia, y tenemos el honor de vivir en una democracia, y tenemos el honor de hacer que estos sistemas hagan algo bueno para el público. Si no lo hacen, es nuestra responsabilidad obligarlos a través de nuestras instituciones gubernamentales, no a través del activismo o sosteniendo carteles, sino aprendiendo la ley y los mecanismos para gobernar realmente y trabajar a través de las instituciones para conseguirlo. Cuando las cosas funcionaban, eso es lo que hicimos. Era un lío y había muchos problemas, pero eso es: bienvenido al autogobierno, bienvenido a ser un ser humano. 

Entonces, lo que tenemos con la Comisión Federal de Comercio y la División Antimonopolio es un buen ejemplo de cómo realmente entras y comienzas a cambiar las cosas. Así que, básicamente, hay dos agencias en el Gobierno que se encargan del antimonopolio. Hay muchas agencias en el Gobierno a nivel estatal, local, y niveles federales que se encargan de la regulación y los mercados. La ley antimonopolio es una especie de punta de lanza específica para ciertas corporaciones. Es como para toda la economía. No fijan precios, no regulan las aerolíneas, pero introducen leyes antimonopolio y se aseguran de que los mercados sean competitivos en general. 

Hay dos agencias que se ocupan de eso. Una es la Comisión Federal de Comercio y la otra es la División Antimonopolio, que forma parte del Departamento de Justicia. Tenemos dos ejecutores populistas realmente buenos: Lina Khan, presidenta de la Comisión Federal de Comercio, y Jonathan Kanter, jefe de la División Antimonopolio. Ambos están comenzando a luchar contra las fusiones. Están comenzando a presentar casos de conducta contra las tácticas estándar que habrían sido anticompetitivas en los años 70, pero hoy en día la gente se encoge de hombros y dice: “Da igual”, y ahora están tratando de volver a implementar ese tipo de ley. Están tratando de resolver problemas como los grupos de inversión, que son como una fuerza financiera… Todo el dinero del mundo está controlado por estos grandes fondos que compran empresas, despiden gente y las fusionan para formar monopolios. Es como una estafa en el centro de la economía, y la ley antimonopolio puede tocar eso. 

Entonces, Kanter y Kahn están tratando de resolverlo. Están abriendo casos, y están siendo escuchados por los tribunales, y están haciendo cambios en la decisión política, realmente en las entrañas del Gobierno. El tipo de lugares que tú o yo no notaríamos necesariamente. Yo sí, pero es mi trabajo. 

Todo el mundo piensa que hay conspiraciones sobre cómo funcionan las cosas y, aunque tiene algo de cierto, son más abiertos y aburridos de lo que la gente supone. Pero están moviendo las palancas en nombre del público. Es un cambio lento, pero ahora hay un montón de demandas antimonopolio contra Google, hay demandas antimonopolio contra los fabricantes de pesticidas, contra las personas que son… empresas que fabrican cerraduras para puertas. Se está investigando a Amazon, App Store, de Apple, y muchas áreas diferentes. Todo esto va a tardar porque los tribunales… No puedes hacer virar un barco gigante en un momento, pero están empezando a dar un giro y estamos empezando a ver resultados. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Bien, ¿y crees que con las elecciones de medio mandato, con cualquiera de esos cambios políticos en la composición del Congreso, realmente veremos que se implementan más leyes antimonopolio, o que el Congreso realmente actuará y aprobará nuevas leyes en esta área? 

Matt Stoller

No lo sé. La respuesta es sí, pero no sé cuándo. Podría ser esta semana, podría ser en un año. Creo que en cinco años tendremos diferentes leyes antimonopolio. Simplemente no sé cuándo. Quiero decir, el liderazgo republicano de la Cámara es muy hostil hacia la nueva legislación antimonopolio, en su mayor parte. En los próximos dos años, el panorama no parece muy prometedor. Pero su propio caucus, los votantes republicanos y los miembros republicanos del Congreso, algunos de ellos quieren legislación antimonopolio. Así que vemos esta extraña dinámica. 

El Senado está controlado por los demócratas. Los demócratas son bastante favorables al fortalecimiento de las leyes antimonopolio. Aunque Chuck Schumer [líder de la mayoría del Senado de los Estados Unidos] no quiere… odia las leyes antimonopolio, por lo que no las llevará a votación. 

Luego, hay muchos estados que cumplen los proyectos de ley antimonopolio. Estamos en las primeras etapas, y creo que veremos una reorganización total de la ley antimonopolio. Lleva tiempo. Este es un país grande y hay que generar cierto nivel de consenso acerca de que la forma en que hemos estado haciendo negocios está causando problemas significativos y deberíamos manejar nuestros sistemas empresariales de una manera diferente. 

Creo que hemos logrado convencer a la gente de que nuestros sistemas empresariales son un problema, que ha habido demasiada consolidación, y ahora estamos en este proceso de explicar y debatir cómo solucionar eso. Y aún no hemos llegado a algún tipo de consenso sobre qué hacer, pero creo que estamos cerca. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Bien, ¿puedes hablar del efecto de los monopolios en la inflación? Porque creo que después de la Ley CARES [Ley de Ayuda, Alivio y Seguridad Económica del Coronavirus], vimos esta ingente transferencia de riqueza hacia arriba, y hay diferentes narrativas sobre qué fue lo que realmente causó la inflación. Algunas personas dirían que la gente tenía mucho dinero, que tenían todo este dinero extra para gastar y eso impulsó la inflación, por lo que la culpa es del gasto del Gobierno, en lugar de buscar potencialmente cómo las empresas se compinchan para subir los precios o incluso los fijan. 

Matt Stoller

Sí, es una buena pregunta. La Ley CARES, solo para aquellos que no lo sepan, fue el proyecto de ley que aprobó el Congreso durante la pandemia para tratar de hacer frente al colapso económico que estábamos experimentando. Por ejemplo, los cheques que recibió la gente, aumento del desempleo, préstamos a pequeñas empresas y luego un rescate para Wall Street. Esos eran [inaudible 00:24:34]. Ese era básicamente el paquete. 

Así que una de las cosas que hace una economía consolidada es que reduce la capacidad disponible en la economía. Cuando tienes cinco empresas en un mercado y cada una de ellas tiene un montón de fábricas, tienes una cierta cantidad de capacidad en el mercado. Si se consolidan en, digamos, dos empresas, lo que quieren hacer esas empresas es bajar la producción y subir los precios. Eso es generalmente lo que suelen hacer los monopolios. Tomarán fábricas y las cerrarán, o tomarán fábricas y las pondrán en China. Ese ha sido el otro tipo de estrategia. 

Podemos ver esto con los ferrocarriles, por ejemplo. Solo tenemos, creo, siete ferrocarriles de clase uno. Solíamos tener docenas de ferrocarriles de clase uno. Han ido cerrando rutas. Llevan mucho tiempo despidiendo trabajadores. Lo vimos con la huelga. Pero esto ha sido un problema, o una dinámica, donde los ferrocarriles dicen: “Queremos ser más rentables, por lo que vamos a reducir la capacidad”. 

Es cierto para la industria del transporte marítimo. Es cierto para muchas industrias diferentes, semiconductores… Ahora bien, ¿qué sucede cuando te deshaces del excedente en la economía? Ocurre que no estás preparado para un shock en el sistema. Si tienes una economía llena de cuellos de botella, que es lo que es un monopolio, básicamente es un cuello de botella, entonces, cuando tienes un shock en el sistema, ese shock se va a acelerar debido a los cuellos de botella. Los monopolistas, cuando ven: “Oh, Dios mío, todos necesitan lo que yo tengo”, de repente: “Voy a subir mucho mis precios, porque puedo hacerlo”. En cambio, si hay un mercado competitivo, donde hay varias empresas que venden algo, subirán los precios porque hay mucha demanda, pero no tanto. También invertirán en más capacidad para poder satisfacer la demanda. 

Eso es lo que realmente no vimos durante el COVID. De repente, había todo este poder de fijación de precios que tenían las firmas consolidadas, y lo explotaron. También el excedente de capacidad en la economía era mucho menor, así que no podías producir más simplemente porque esas fábricas habían sido cerradas. 

Luego, la Ley CARES, porque contenía un rescate para Wall Street, facilitó que hubiera muchas más fusiones, por lo que hubo más consolidación como resultado de la política de la Ley CARES para paliar la situación del COVID. Creo que lo que hizo es que no solo… Creo que aceleró la inflación. La inflación ocurrió debido al COVID. Apagas la economía, la vuelves a encender, y solo vas a tener problemas. Con la desmovilización en la Primera Guerra Mundial o la Segunda Guerra Mundial, hubo una inflación significativa, y eso es solo porque todo estaba fuera de control y por el regreso a una economía en tiempos de paz. Vas a tener… Las señales de precios eran disparatadas, y eso es un poco de lo que pasó con el COVID. La razón por la que fue mucho peor de lo que tenía que ser es que teníamos esa economía consolidada. Entonces, creo que eso responde a la pregunta. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Sí, lo hace. En cuanto a la Reserva Federal, ¿estás a favor de subidas tan grandes en las tasas de interés o crees que han sido totalmente ineficaces? 

Matt Stoller

Soy un poco inusual para ser progresista porque creo que la Fed debería endurecer la política monetaria. Hay una opinión que se remonta… Puedes verla… Como si tuviéramos cero… La Reserva Federal, para mí… Hay algo llamado efecto Cantillon. El efecto Cantillon proviene de este economista del siglo XVIII que básicamente dijo que cuanto más cerca estás de… El rey controla la política monetaria. Esencialmente, el rey controla el oro en una economía. Si se descubre una mina de oro, las personas que están más cerca de la mina de oro o que son más amigos del rey van a tener acceso al oro primero. Van a poder usar ese dinero para comprar activos antes de que los demás tengan acceso a ese oro. Cuando llegue a todos los demás, habrá inflación y todo eso. Pero, esencialmente, era una discusión sobre política monetaria, y decía: “Cuanto más cerca estés de los creadores institucionales de dinero, más poder tienes”. 

Eso se puede cambiar. Puedes construir instituciones que muevan el dinero hacia todos por igual. Pero la idea es que el dinero no es neutral. Tuvimos eso. Tuvimos muchas facilidades para permitir más préstamos a pequeñas empresas y préstamos a la gente común. Estas están algo atrofiadas. Así que hoy, cuando imprime dinero la Reserva Federal, que sería, supongo, la mina de oro en el centro de la economía, las personas que lo reciben primero están en Wall Street. 

Muchos liberales, o de izquierdas, piensan: “Bueno, la Reserva Federal debería mantener bajas las tasas de interés porque esto ayudará a la gente común”. Pero, de hecho, cuando la Reserva Federal mantiene bajas las tasas de interés, esto no nos beneficia a ti o a mí. Quiero decir, no sé si te has dado cuenta, pero las tasas de interés de mi tarjeta de crédito no han bajado desde que la Reserva Federal redujo las tasas en 2010. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Estoy en Alemania, que es un espacio regulatorio totalmente diferente. 

Matt Stoller

Correcto, bueno, solo puedo decir que no lo han hecho. Las tasas de interés de las tarjetas de crédito… Las tasas de interés en Wall Street eran del 0 % y las tasas de interés de las tarjetas de crédito eran del 20 %. Las tarjetas de crédito fueron el resultado del poder de mercado, no de que la Fed las redujera o aumentara. Wall Street obtiene una cierta tasa de interés… Wall Street tiene una tasa de interés y la gente común tiene otra tasa de interés. Creo que no deberíamos confundirlas. 

Ahora bien, el problema con las tasas de interés bajas para Wall Street cuando la Fed mantiene las tasas de interés bajas es que Wall Street toma ese dinero y lo usa para realizar fusiones y cerrar fábricas y cosas por el estilo. No llega a la economía real, no llega a la gente corriente. 

Lo que ha sucedido desde que la Reserva Federal comenzó a subir las tasas de interés es que muchas de las estafas de Wall Street se han derrumbado. La criptomoneda es un buen ejemplo. La criptomoneda no es más que una estafa y una mentira. Cuando la Fed comenzó a endurecer las condiciones financieras, todo se vino abajo. Y eso es algo bueno. Las firmas de capital riesgo están teniendo problemas para conseguir crédito. Hay todo tipo de estafas piramidales en la economía que se están desmoronando. Creo que es algo bueno que la Fed esté endureciendo las condiciones financieras porque creo que había demasiado dinero fácil y no fluía hacia la gente normal para conseguir préstamos y construir fábricas o… No es que la gente normal construya fábricas, pero no iba a la gente normal que pedía préstamos para lo que querían hacer, iba hacia personas poderosas que lo usaban para la recompra de acciones y fusiones y adquisiciones y compensación ejecutiva y cosas por el estilo. Eso es todo un montón de… Esa no es una inversión útil. 

Talia Baroncelli 

También hay otra cosa que la Fed ha estado haciendo, y no lo entiendo muy bien, pero se llama normalización. Cuando reduces tu hoja de balance y liquidas los activos que posees. ¿Cómo afecta eso al mercado inmobiliario? ¿Remedia eso de alguna manera algunas de las barreras que la gente tiene para comprar una casa en los EE. UU., o qué es…? 

Matt Stoller

La Fed básicamente estaba prestando dinero directamente a la gente para comprar casas. Esa es una forma de decirlo. Hay formas complicadas de hablar de ello. Decían: “Vamos a dar dinero a los bancos que están prestando dinero a la gente para comprar casas”. Dieron billones de dólares para hacer eso. ¿Y qué pasó? La gente compró muchas casas y los precios de las viviendas se dispararon. Subieron un 40 % durante la pandemia, lo cual es una locura. Es demasiado y hace que sea muy caro comprar una casa. 

Lo que ha hecho la Fed desde entonces es que han comenzado a decir: “Está bien, no vamos a prestar dinero a la gente para comprar casas. Vamos a empezar a recuperar parte de ese dinero”. El resultado es que es mucho más caro comprar una casa si eres un comprador. Los precios de la vivienda han comenzado a bajar un poco. Todavía hay una crisis de asequibilidad enorme, pero la burbuja de la vivienda ha disminuido un poco. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Está bien, y quizá podamos hablar rápidamente sobre criptomonedas porque creo que esto es como el Traje Nuevo del Emperador, donde está empezando a revelarse que no es tan innovador como la gente pensaba. Y quizá puedas explicar qué son SBF [Sam Bankman-Fried] y FTX. Es una casa de cambio de criptomoneda, pero esta estafa, y todos los fraudes que SBF estaba haciendo con su otra empresa, Alameda, ¿por qué es tan importante y a qué conducirá? 

Matt Stoller

Bueno, comencemos con la criptomoneda porque creo que a la gente le gusta pensar que Sam Bankman-Fried y FTX son una especie de incidente aislado. Mucha gente en criptomoneda dice: “Nosotros somos diferentes. Ellos son el malo de la criptomoneda”. Tenemos que empezar con la premisa: las criptomonedas son una estafa. Es solo una serie de chanchullos para hacerse rico rápidamente, fraude y lavado de dinero. No es algo tecnológicamente innovador. 

La gente oye hablar de esta cosa llamada blockchain. La cadena de bloques es solo una forma diferente de tener una hoja de cálculo. Eso es todo. Es como una hoja de cálculo de Excel, excepto que se hace de una manera ligeramente diferente. Una criptomoneda es simplemente una de estas hojas de cálculo, le pones marcas, y la llamas como quieras llamarla… ethereum o solana. Simplemente dices: “Tienes cinco solanas según la hoja de cálculo. La hoja de cálculo se llama Solana. Tengo tres solanas y voy a comerciar contigo”. Tiene algunos atributos de dinero privado, pero eso es todo. Son solo marcas en una hoja de cálculo. 

Es valioso en la medida en que la gente esté dispuesta a comprarlo. Si tú y yo pensamos que Solana tiene valor, supongo que tiene algún valor temporalmente. Es muy parecido a la década de 1920. Hubo una burbuja inmobiliaria en Florida, y la gente en Nueva York intercambiaba parcelas de tierra… en Florida, muchos terrenos. Resulta que algunas de estas parcelas no existían. Estaban en ciudades que no existían. Entonces, ¿eso significa que esas parcelas no tienen valor? Bueno, en cierto sentido, sí. Pero también, como la gente las intercambia, valen lo que la gente paga, aunque sea mentira. Este es un término llamado bezzle que acuñó John Kenneth Galbraith, y significa que las cosas fraudulentas tienen valor mientras la burbuja siga funcionando, pero una vez que la burbuja revienta, ya no tienen valor. 

Eso es la criptomoneda. La criptomoneda no tiene casos de uso excepto juegos de azar, lavado de dinero y fraude. Puedes presentar el lavado de dinero de una manera positiva si quieres. Puedes decir: “Esto nos permite mover dinero fuera del alcance de los regímenes autoritarios, o esto nos da privacidad financiera”, pero es solo lavado de dinero. 

Entonces, por supuesto, atrae a los delincuentes. FTX y Sam Bankman-Fried son solo delincuentes que estaban robando el dinero de sus clientes y usando transacciones falsas para disfrazar el hecho de que estaban robando a la gente, que en su mayoría intentaban aprovecharse de los chanchullos para hacerse ricos rápidamente. Es un poco difícil sentir lástima por las personas a las que les robaron el dinero. Pero eso es lo que estaba pasando. 

Hay toda una serie de instituciones interrelacionadas que son tan fraudulentas como FTX, algunas de las cuales colapsaron. Algunas estafas piramidales colapsaron hace seis meses, hace tres meses o hace un mes. Otras van a colapsar dentro de un mes o dos o tres, pero todo se va a derrumbar porque no tiene sentido. Son altas finanzas sin propósito. Por supuesto, está plagado de estafas y lavado de dinero, y Sam Bankman-Fried es solo uno más. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Bien. Pero algunas personas dirían que potencialmente podríamos regularlo. La SEC, la Comisión de Bolsa y Valores, podría regularlo como valores, o bien la CFTC [Comisión de Negociación de Futuros de Productos Básicos] como productos. En Europa, por ejemplo, uno de los miembros de la junta del BCE [Banco Central Europeo], Fabio Panetta, dijo ayer que debemos regular las criptomonedas a nivel internacional, pero también deshacernos de las criptomonedas que consumen mucha energía. 

Los europeos parecen estar muy centrados en regular. Creo que tu opinión es que deberíamos dejar que se autodestruyan, ¿verdad? 

Matt Stoller

Sí. Mira, existe este molesto lenguaje en código de alguna gente que dice: “Debemos regular las criptomonedas”. Puedes regular las criptomonedas permitiendo que las personas arriesguen su dinero y hagan cosas estúpidas, o puedes regular las criptomonedas implementando regímenes de transparencia y protecciones al consumidor, y esto hará que no sea económico tenerlas. Eso es lo que quiere hacer la Comisión de Bolsa y Valores, regular las criptomonedas. Si regularas las criptomonedas y las hicieras básicamente… Un coin es esencialmente como una acción, solo que no tiene sentido. Imagínate que tienes una acción de IBM [International Business Machines Corporation], pero esta no produjera nada como empresa. No hay un negocio detrás. Eso es lo que es. Si tienes que hacer pública esta información y tienes algunas reglas de protección al consumidor, no vale la pena tener ese instrumento de azar. Es costoso y no tiene sentido. 

Así que creo que esa es la manera de regularlas y deshacerse de ellas. Diré que los reguladores europeos son generalmente débiles, son débiles y unos perdedores. Mi experiencia con los EE. UU. es que, en el sistema regulatorio, a veces tienes personas que están haciendo cosas realmente útiles. Gary Gensler [presidente, Comisión de Bolsa y Valores de EE. UU.] estaba haciendo cosas realmente útiles, y la SEC… Es bastante corrupto, pero somos bastante sinceros sobre lo corrupto que es. En Europa, es solo un puñado de tecnócratas perdedores que siempre fingen que están tratando de hacer algo, pero no lo hacen, porque Europa es fundamentalmente, la UE es fundamentalmente una estructura disfuncional que en realidad no puede hacer nada bien. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Carece de canales democráticos. Uno de los problemas es que, debido a que es una entidad supranacional, representa diferentes estados-nación y es difícil armonizar ciertas áreas. 

Matt Stoller

Necesitas consenso entre 27 estados y luego los burócratas que viven en Bruselas desprecian secretamente la democracia y todos son realmente pasivo-agresivos y en realidad no les gusta hacer nada. Es por eso que llevan diez años emitiendo comunicados de prensa sobre cómo están tomando medidas enérgicas contra Google. A mí Google me parece bastante poderoso. 

En los EE. UU., decimos: “Sí, todo el mundo está pagado por Google”, y en Europa, dicen: “Hemos estado implementando medidas”. ¿Quieres la versión pasivo-agresiva o la otra? Personalmente, no me gusta la versión pasivo-agresiva. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Sí, es esta cosa extraña de tratar de obtener un consenso sin realmente hacer nada y con diferentes marcos regulatorios. Estoy de acuerdo en que existe esta tendencia a valorizar el pensamiento tecnocrático y simplemente confiar en las élites sin cuestionar realmente lo que están haciendo y tener algún tipo de responsabilidad democrática. Vimos esto con los rescates griegos. 

Matt Stoller

Sí, eso fue un maldito desastre. La otra cosa es que les encanta quejarse de los EE. UU. Los EE. UU… 

Talia Baroncelli 

Bueno, a mí también me encanta quejarme de los EE. UU., pero por diferentes razones. 

Matt Stoller

Sí, pero odian a los Estados Unidos por las razones equivocadas. Hay muchas críticas a Estados Unidos que tienen mucho sentido. Pero a los burócratas europeos no les gustan los EE. UU., se quejan de los Estados Unidos por las razones equivocadas. 

Básicamente están enojados con los EE. UU. por darles armamento gratis y acceso a los mercados estadounidenses. Solo están molestos porque no quieren hacer nada y quieren alguien a quien culpar. Es muy parecido a tener esta frustración infantil con tus padres. Miran a los Estados Unidos como sus padres y no quieren admitir que en realidad no gastan dinero en defensa ni tienen la capacidad de hacer nada geopolíticamente. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Apenas están cumpliendo con sus compromisos del 2 % con la OTAN y, sin embargo, quieren que Estados Unidos los financie y básicamente les dé todas las armas que necesitan. 

Matt Stoller

Así es. Estados Unidos acaba de aprobar un proyecto de ley para fabricar vehículos eléctricos aquí. Y los europeos dicen: “Esto es discriminar contra las empresas europeas y es realmente proteccionista y cómo te atreves. Y somos el baluarte del libre comercio.” Y eso son tonterías. Europa es superproteccionista. Para exportar un automóvil de EE. UU. a Europa, hay una tarifa del 10 %. Para exportar un automóvil de Europa a los EE. UU., hay una tarifa del 2,5 %. No soy un librecambista. No me importa. Lo que pienso es: construye tus propias cosas. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Sí, exacto. ¿No era eso también un remanente de todo el consenso de Washington, esta tendencia hacia la desregulación y la privatización? Y dicen: “Está bien, vamos a asegurarnos de que otros países que quizá sean menos poderosos en el sur global no puedan implementar sus propios marcos proteccionistas o introducir subsidios”, porque la UE no quiere eso y los EE. UU. no quieren eso. Si nos fijamos en la UE, sus subsidios están entre los más altos cuando se trata de agricultura y otras áreas. Por lo tanto, es muy hipócrita que se espere que ciertos países no tengan medidas proteccionistas cuando otros países lo están haciendo. 

Matt Stoller

Estoy de acuerdo con eso. También mira lo que pasó con las vacunas. 

Estados Unidos, en realidad, por primera vez, dijo: “Oh, deberíamos compartir la PI [propiedad intelectual] con el resto del mundo”. ¿Y quiénes fueron los malos? “No, tenemos que hacer lo que Pharma quiere”. Fue Alemania. Alemania fue la líder en tratar de bloquear eso y bloqueó con éxito la capacidad. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Bill Gates tampoco quería algo de… 

Matt Stoller

Sí, pero Bill Gates no tiene voto, formalmente. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Pero estaba apoyando a COVAX, y COVAX tenía un mandato e intención muy específicos para básicamente dar dinero a otros países, pero no compartir la tecnología con ellos para que desarrollasen su propia vacuna. 

Matt Stoller

Así es. Creo que es correcto que el enfoque general europeo, y creo que el enfoque de EE.UU., el enfoque neoliberal en los Estados Unidos en la década de 1990, fue realmente destructivo y básicamente les decía a los países más pequeños y a los países más débiles: “Hagan lo que queramos, que nosotros haremos lo que queramos y los joderemos”. Esa era la actitud, y fue realmente destructiva. 

Estados Unidos se está alejando de ese marco. Todavía está en transición, pero Europa es una especie de último obstáculo. Creo que puedes ver eso. 

¿Cómo dices? 

Talia Baroncelli 

Los últimos neoliberales no quieren darse por vencidos. Es irónico estar aquí a veces porque vemos este desprecio por los EE. UU. Realmente apoyan estas relaciones transatlánticas, pero parecen enfocarse en lo que no deben. Por ejemplo, cuando Joe Biden llegó al poder, dijeron: “Oh, ahora volvemos a tener esta increíble relación transatlántica”. No parecieron identificar que Trump no era realmente una anomalía. Solo porque no estaba muy a favor de esas relaciones, él no era esta anomalía, el único malo. 

Quiero decir, hay ciertas tendencias en la hegemonía estadounidense que estaban ocurriendo antes de eso, y parecen fijarse en las cosas equivocadas y amplificarlas. 

Matt Stoller

Sí, están obsesionados con los modales. Eso es lo que era. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Así es. ¿A quién le importa que ahora tengamos una mejor relación transatlántica? ¿Y, de todas formas, eso qué significa? Puedes remontarte a otras administraciones de EE. UU. y ver el… 

Matt Stoller

Bueno, creo que puedes ver… Es más obvio cuando se trata de China. A los alemanes básicamente no les importa el fascismo. Están de acuerdo con el fascismo otra vez, lo que sucede en Alemania. El fascismo chino es perfectamente aceptable para la industria automotriz alemana. Es aceptable. Básicamente, la política alemana es: no interrumpas las agradables vacaciones de un hombre alemán mayor. Si haces eso, asesinarán a un sinfín de personas para asegurarse de que sus vacaciones sean agradables. 

Ese fue el marco político de Angela Merkel. Es algo sociópata. Los alemanes han… Tenían cosas baratas de China, gas barato de Rusia y armamento gratis de los EE. UU. Son solo unos grandes oportunistas, y destruyeron a Grecia. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Básicamente destruyeron a Grecia para que Grecia pudiera pagar a los bancos alemanes y franceses todo el dinero fácil que recibieron. Luego lo presentaron como una crisis de deuda soberana. 

Matt Stoller

Los perezosos griegos. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Sí, esos griegos perezosos. 

Matt Stoller

También hubo un extraño componente racista, que fue hilarante. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Sí, Wolfgang Schäuble, el ministro de Finanzas en ese momento, era un bicho raro. Realmente le gustaba demonizar a los griegos. Fue realmente extraño en ese momento. 

Matt Stoller

Sí, fui a Alemania en un momento determinado, y creo que me peleé a gritos con el alcalde de algún pueblo por eso. Le decía: “Están jodiendo a los griegos”. Él dijo: “Alemania debe dar una buena imagen en política exterior”. Y yo: “No son tan buenos. Están jodiendo a los griegos”. Él dice: “Oh, eso es más complicado”. 

Siempre me meto en peleas a gritos con Alemania y siempre llego al punto en que digo: “Ustedes eran los nazis. Ya no son nazis, pero no esperen alabanzas por ello, por no ser nazis ahora”. Quieren que les reconozcamos… “Bueno, sabemos cómo tratar con los nazis”. “No, no saben”. 

Talia Baroncelli 

No. Es un gran problema en Alemania ahora porque muchas veces tienden a equiparar las críticas al Gobierno israelí, como el antisionismo, con ser antisemita, que obviamente no es el caso. No parecen darse cuenta de que están financiando ciertas compañías militares que están involucradas… 

Matt Stoller

Todo el asunto de Israel es… La política allí es algo rara. No quiero entrar demasiado en el tema de Israel, pero uno de los movimientos antimonopolio más exitosos del mundo fue en Israel en 2011, lo cual es interesante. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Sí, bueno, gracias por acompañarnos. Sería genial tenerte de nuevo, y muchas gracias, Matt. 

Matt Stoller

Muy bien, muchas gracias. Nos vemos. 

Talia Baroncelli 

Cuídate. Adiós.


Select one or choose any amount to donate whatever you like
$

Never miss another story

Subscribe to theAnalysis.news - Newsletter
Name(Required)

Matt Stoller is the Director of Research at the American Economic Liberties Project. He is the author of the Simon and Schuster book Goliath: The Hundred Year War Between Monopoly Power and Democracy, which Business Insider called “one of the year’s best books on how to rethink capitalism and improve the economy.” Stoller is a former policy advisor to the Senate Budget Committee.

He also worked for a member of the Financial Services Committee in the U.S. House of Representatives during the financial crisis. While a staffer, he wrote a provision of law mandating a third-party audit of the Federal Reserve’s emergency lending activities. He also helped cut part of a $20 billion subsidy to large financial institutions. His 2012 law review article on the foreclosure crisis, The Housing Crash and the End of American Citizenship, predicted the rise of autocratic political forces, and his 2016 Atlantic article, How the Democrats Killed their Populist Soul, helped inspire the new anti-monopoly movement. His writing has appeared in the Washington Post, the New York Times, Fast Company, Foreign Policy, the Guardian, Vice, The American Conservative, and the Baffler. Stoller writes the monopoly-focused newsletter Big, with tens of thousands of subscribers on SubStack.”

theAnalysis.news theme music

written by Slim Williams for Paul Jay’s documentary film “Never-Endum-Referendum“.  

Similar Posts

One Comment

  1. Hmm, what seems to be missing in this discussion of “Monopoly Power v Democracy” is a discussion of the biggest monopoly of them all – the political one, with 2 parties, in essence a cartel, controlling Gov’t functions and agencies from which follows the regulatory handling of all these other monopolies – there has been a political consolidation over the decades and the lack of competition is not simply a passive result, but the result of these 2 parties actively squelching any competition – keeping 3rd parties off ballots, out of debates, and starved of funds, out of the media – not to mention the ubiquitous spread of BS like “3rd parties can’t win” etc.
    So we are told our only choices at the polls are D/Rs – because the D/Rs are making sure that is true, by actively limiting our choices to them – meanwhile, all these other monopolies can consolidate their power by – “influencing” those D/Rs to pass laws and regs that favor them … as he pointed out the trend that took shape at least by the 80’s and has accelerated ever since ….
    In all the discussions of monopolies, I don’t recall ever hearing our “major” political parties described as such, or as a cartel – but if you listen to the description of the set up and activities in all these commercial spheres, you realize it is a perfect description our political system as well – indeed, when we go to the polls we are free to choose – between 2 parties – and depending on your outlook, it’s like having to choose between Pepsi and Coke or Arsenic and Strychnine ….
    So I would posit if you want to clean up the situation Stoller is talking about – the first place you have to start is cleaning up the Gov’t – at the polls …
    And the media, if they do care about this, could have 3rd party candidates on – not to “hawk their wares” but to explain precisely who is preventing “we the people” from being able to make other choices as to who we want to represent us …
    To me, this is the biggest monopoly threat to our democracy – and nobody seems to care …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *